1. Stephen King talks to Terry Gross about whether his writing changed after being hit by a car and getting addicted to Oxycontin, a habit which he has since kicked:

When I said that I wasn’t going to write or when I was going to retire, I was doing a lot of Oxycontin for pain and I was still having a lot of pain and it’s a depressive drug anyway and I was kind of a depressed human being because the therapy was painful. The recovery was slow and the whole thing just seemed like too much work, and I thought, ‘Well, I’ll concentrate on getting better and I probably won’t want to write anymore,’ but as health and vitality came back, the urge to write came back. But here’s the thing: I’m on the inside and I’m not the best person to ask if my writing changed after that accident. I don’t really know the answer to that. I do know that … was close, that was really being close to stepping out. The accident and, a couple years later I had double pneumonia and that was close to stepping out of this life as well, and I think you have a couple of close brushes with death like that, it probably has [effect]. Somebody said, ‘The prospect of imminent death has a wonderful clarifying effect on the mind,’ and I don’t know if that’s true, but I do think it cause some changes, some evolution in the way a person works, but on a day-by-day basis I just still enjoy doing what I’m doing.


Image of Stephen King by PILGRIM via Wired View in High-Res

    Stephen King talks to Terry Gross about whether his writing changed after being hit by a car and getting addicted to Oxycontin, a habit which he has since kicked:

    When I said that I wasn’t going to write or when I was going to retire, I was doing a lot of Oxycontin for pain and I was still having a lot of pain and it’s a depressive drug anyway and I was kind of a depressed human being because the therapy was painful. The recovery was slow and the whole thing just seemed like too much work, and I thought, ‘Well, I’ll concentrate on getting better and I probably won’t want to write anymore,’ but as health and vitality came back, the urge to write came back. But here’s the thing: I’m on the inside and I’m not the best person to ask if my writing changed after that accident. I don’t really know the answer to that. I do know that … was close, that was really being close to stepping out. The accident and, a couple years later I had double pneumonia and that was close to stepping out of this life as well, and I think you have a couple of close brushes with death like that, it probably has [effect]. Somebody said, ‘The prospect of imminent death has a wonderful clarifying effect on the mind,’ and I don’t know if that’s true, but I do think it cause some changes, some evolution in the way a person works, but on a day-by-day basis I just still enjoy doing what I’m doing.

    Image of Stephen King by PILGRIM via Wired

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Stephen King

    Joyland

    Wired

    Pilgrim

    Writing

    Books

  1. So it’s not that your dog is either smart or stupid. It’s that she’s both smart AND stupid.

    Wired:

    They’re incredibly vapid when it comes to understanding the physical world, things like understanding that if you’re connected to somebody with a leash you can’t go on the other side of the lamppost. There’s good evidence that that really is a cognitive constraint. They just don’t get it.

    Here’s a Fresh Air interview that demonstrates the dogs-are-smart half of this subject. It’s about training dogs for search-and-rescue missions

  2. non-gratuitous dog post

    Wired

    having it both ways

  1. Posted on 16 April, 2012

    113 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from radiomint

    radiomint:

HIV Virus

Tomorrow: Science writer Carl Zimmer talks about the hunt for a ‘penicillin-like’ anti-viral medication. View in High-Res

    radiomint:

    HIV Virus

    Tomorrow: Science writer Carl Zimmer talks about the hunt for a ‘penicillin-like’ anti-viral medication.

  2. virus

    hiv

    carl zimmer

    science

    wired