1. The thing that I really thought about the most and will for the rest of my life is taking risks that affect other people — that have consequences for other people… [it’s] on my shoulders forever….

    And that’s what I can take out of that, as small as that is: to know when enough is enough, to know when to leave, to listen to the people around you — local people who know more about the place than you do. If they say it’s time to go, then go, because if you stay and something happens to them, that’s a horrible, horrible thing that’s not reversible.

    — 

    Photojournalist Tyler Hicks 

    He spoke to Terry Gross about what he learned from his experience being kidnapped in Libya with three other journalists. 

  2. tyler hicks

    photojournalism

    photography

    war

    terrorism

    new york times

  1. Posted on 24 April, 2014

    2,553 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from theweekmagazine

    New York Times photojournalist Tyler Hicks spoke to Fresh Air about his Pulitzer Prize-winning photographs of the terrorist siege at a Nairobi mall in September 2013. In today’s interview Hicks tells Terry Gross about taking this photo:

"It’s a very exposed vantage point so I didn’t spend a lot of time there. But I looked down and saw this incredible scene of a young woman with two children hiding on the floor of a café. You could see shell casings all around them from bullets and they were just petrified, they were completely still and … to me, that photograph really sums up what happened there. Outside of the frame, all around them and on the floor of this mall were bodies, a man next to an ATM machine, a woman still holding a shopping bag who had been killed, and they somehow managed to avoid that."

The webpage includes more of his prize-winning photos. Interview extras can be found on Soundcloud. 
Photo Tyler Hicks/New York Times  View in High-Res

    New York Times photojournalist Tyler Hicks spoke to Fresh Air about his Pulitzer Prize-winning photographs of the terrorist siege at a Nairobi mall in September 2013. In today’s interview Hicks tells Terry Gross about taking this photo:

    "It’s a very exposed vantage point so I didn’t spend a lot of time there. But I looked down and saw this incredible scene of a young woman with two children hiding on the floor of a café. You could see shell casings all around them from bullets and they were just petrified, they were completely still and … to me, that photograph really sums up what happened there. Outside of the frame, all around them and on the floor of this mall were bodies, a man next to an ATM machine, a woman still holding a shopping bag who had been killed, and they somehow managed to avoid that."

    The webpage includes more of his prize-winning photos. Interview extras can be found on Soundcloud

    Photo Tyler Hicks/New York Times 

  2. photography

    photojournalism

    tyler hicks

    pulitzer prize

    nairobi mall shooting

    terrorism

  1. I don’t think of it as graphic. Other people have used that word and we took a lot of criticism for that front page picture. That picture that Tyler took in the early days of the famine we put above the fold very prominently on the front page of The New York Times and a lot of people said, ‘It’s graphic, it’s too disturbing, it’s sensitive.’ And our point was, ‘It’s supposed to be disturbing. What’s happening is disturbing.’ Is it graphic? Graphic almost [means] a gratuitous sensationalist approach to depicting something. We didn’t feel that. We weren’t trying to exaggerate or be especially dramatic. Our approach was to be very nonjudgmental – not so much understatement, but just be very straightforward.

    — Jeffrey Gettleman on the photograph that Tyler Hicks took of the dying child in Somalia [complete interview here]

  2. jeffrey gettleman

    tyler hicks

    somalia

    new york times