1. Welcome to Twitter, Ira.

    Welcome to Twitter, Ira.

  2. ira glass

    this american life

    twitter

    radio

  1. Check out Alexis Madrigal's latest article in The Atlantic, How Twitter Has Changed Over the Years in 12 Charts
He’s also the Fresh Air tech contributor. You can read/listen to his pieces here.

    Check out Alexis Madrigal's latest article in The Atlantic, How Twitter Has Changed Over the Years in 12 Charts

    He’s also the Fresh Air tech contributor. You can read/listen to his pieces here.

  2. alexis madrigal

    twitter

    tech

    the atlantic

  1. Could this be the ultimate list of "People to Follow on Twitter"?

  2. World Thinkers

    Twitter

  1. Posted on 6 February, 2013

    407 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from everfray

    Over at Esquire there’s a fun piece, "Twitter Memes That Live On: The Oral History," that has the stories behind some of the best Twitter memes. Like “Paul Ryan Gosling” and “Zooey Asks Siri.”

Curtis Dicker knew he was onto something when the Manic Pixie Dream Girl asked her phone if it was raining. “My friend and I saw that commercial one too many times, and he mentioned it would be a funny Twitter account,” he says. Dicker devoted a month to “searching and following users who made a joke about the commercial on Twitter,” and it “snowballed from there.”

My personal favorite Twitter account (although I’m not quite sure it qualifies as a meme) is the Wise_Kaplan account. if you didn’t catch Wise’s epic tribute to Ed Koch last week you should rectify that. Also, a 2010 explanation from Slate (“Trench Coat, Unlit Cigar”) about what makes Wise (and the Hyde to his Jekyll, Cranky_Kaplan) so great:

Wise and Cranky are the children of a lost New York. From breakfast until deep into the night, they travel back and forth between the city and the bedroom community of Larchmont, N.Y., charting a path among Manhattan’s decaying cultural landmarks and greasy-spoon diners. Their heroes are the ghosts of jazz greats, long-dead stylists, and midcentury entertainers.

    Over at Esquire there’s a fun piece, "Twitter Memes That Live On: The Oral History," that has the stories behind some of the best Twitter memes. Like “Paul Ryan Gosling” and “Zooey Asks Siri.”

    Curtis Dicker knew he was onto something when the Manic Pixie Dream Girl asked her phone if it was raining. “My friend and I saw that commercial one too many times, and he mentioned it would be a funny Twitter account,” he says. Dicker devoted a month to “searching and following users who made a joke about the commercial on Twitter,” and it “snowballed from there.”

    My personal favorite Twitter account (although I’m not quite sure it qualifies as a meme) is the Wise_Kaplan account. if you didn’t catch Wise’s epic tribute to Ed Koch last week you should rectify that. Also, a 2010 explanation from Slate (“Trench Coat, Unlit Cigar”) about what makes Wise (and the Hyde to his Jekyll, Cranky_Kaplan) so great:

    Wise and Cranky are the children of a lost New York. From breakfast until deep into the night, they travel back and forth between the city and the bedroom community of Larchmont, N.Y., charting a path among Manhattan’s decaying cultural landmarks and greasy-spoon diners. Their heroes are the ghosts of jazz greats, long-dead stylists, and midcentury entertainers.

  2. No this is not a cheap excuse to post a picture of Ryan Gosling we promise

    Twitter

    Esquire

    Wise and Cranky

  1. Between abortion and Scientology on the show this week, I wanted to offer you all something light for weekend reading. I tried. This New York Magazine profile of Bret Easton Ellis — "Bret Easton Ellis’s Real Art Form Is the Tweet" — by Vanessa Grigoriadis is mesmerizing. It maybe sort of light, but in a really dark way. Plus, Grigoriadis is so good — I would read her day planner if people under 60 still used day planners —  I couldn’t not recommend it. Plus, it includes the phrase “loose-leaf-tea blogger.”




Twitter mixes literature (of an admittedly minimal sort) with performance, and it’s perfect for Ellis, who has always been, when you think about it, more of a conceptual artist than an author. The work isn’t beside the point, but it isn’t the whole point. In this new métier, each part of his persona is on view: satirist, nihilist, glamour guy, exhibitionist, knee-jerk contrarian, self-pitying cokehead, and a few other things, all of which make some laugh with glee and others avert their eyes in boredom, and even more glance back in spite of their revulsion, wondering, as one of his followers did the other day: “Is Bret Easton Ellis dead inside?” Indeed, on Twitter, just as it was with Less Than Zero almost 30 years ago, that’s still the question. It may or may not be a question he asks himself—that, too, is part of the show. Ellis has worked hard to make himself a pop-cultural monster—“monster” has been one of his nicknames—then denies that he’s anything but a middle-aged homebody.




Related and if you somehow missed it: "Here Is What Happens When You Cast Lindsay Lohan in Your Movie."

    Between abortion and Scientology on the show this week, I wanted to offer you all something light for weekend reading. I tried. This New York Magazine profile of Bret Easton Ellis — "Bret Easton Ellis’s Real Art Form Is the Tweet" — by Vanessa Grigoriadis is mesmerizing. It maybe sort of light, but in a really dark way. Plus, Grigoriadis is so good — I would read her day planner if people under 60 still used day planners — I couldn’t not recommend it. Plus, it includes the phrase “loose-leaf-tea blogger.”

    Twitter mixes literature (of an admittedly minimal sort) with performance, and it’s perfect for Ellis, who has always been, when you think about it, more of a conceptual artist than an author. The work isn’t beside the point, but it isn’t the whole point. In this new métier, each part of his persona is on view: satirist, nihilist, glamour guy, exhibitionist, knee-jerk contrarian, self-pitying cokehead, and a few other things, all of which make some laugh with glee and others avert their eyes in boredom, and even more glance back in spite of their revulsion, wondering, as one of his followers did the other day: “Is Bret Easton Ellis dead inside?” Indeed, on Twitter, just as it was with Less Than Zero almost 30 years ago, that’s still the question. It may or may not be a question he asks himself—that, too, is part of the show. Ellis has worked hard to make himself a pop-cultural monster—“monster” has been one of his nicknames—then denies that he’s anything but a middle-aged homebody.

    Related and if you somehow missed it: "Here Is What Happens When You Cast Lindsay Lohan in Your Movie."

  2. Weekend reading

    New York Magazine

    Bret Easton Ellis

    Vanessa Grigoriadis

    Twitter

  1. (Steve Martin’s Twitter profile photo.)
On tap for today: Steve Martin. While we won’t hear about it on the show, the actor, comic, writer, and banjo-player joined Twitter in 2010 and now has over 3 million followers. He’s collected his funniest Tweets and some of the best responses from followers in a book, which you can learn more about in this NPR interview.
Below is a sampling of recent Martin tweets:

Can you believe I was arrested for wanting to watch Oprah? And I found out later she wasn’t even home.
Drank 32 oz. soda and now moving on to heroin
It was night. Not the kind of night where the sun has set, but a night like a chicken hunkering down on a clutch of fresh quail eggs.
In legitimate armed robbery, females have a way of not losing their stuff.
Sometimes it is correct to use three semicolons: Jamie, my brother, and I got in the canoe ;;;.

    (Steve Martin’s Twitter profile photo.)

    On tap for today: Steve Martin. While we won’t hear about it on the show, the actor, comic, writer, and banjo-player joined Twitter in 2010 and now has over 3 million followers. He’s collected his funniest Tweets and some of the best responses from followers in a book, which you can learn more about in this NPR interview.

    Below is a sampling of recent Martin tweets:

    Can you believe I was arrested for wanting to watch Oprah? And I found out later she wasn’t even home.

    Drank 32 oz. soda and now moving on to heroin

    It was night. Not the kind of night where the sun has set, but a night like a chicken hunkering down on a clutch of fresh quail eggs.

    In legitimate armed robbery, females have a way of not losing their stuff.

    Sometimes it is correct to use three semicolons: Jamie, my brother, and I got in the canoe ;;;.

  2. Steve Martin

    Twitter

  1. Wikipedia, what is 80,000?

    80,000 (eighty thousand) is the natural number that comes after 79,999 and before 80,001.

    Thanks, Wikipedia.

    It’s also the number of Tumblr (and Twitter) followers we now have. Thank you all. Let’s celebrate with 22.2166666 days of non-stop partying.

  2. 80000

    tumblr

    twitter

  1. We used all the available tools in order to communicate with each other, collaborate and agree on a date, a time and a location for the start of the revolution. Yet, starting Jan. 28, the revolution was on the streets. It was not on Facebook, it was not on Twitter. Those were tools to relay information, to tell people the truth about what’s happening on the ground.

    — Internet activist Wael Ghonim says sites like Facebook are tools that can help connect people and disseminate information to the masses, but cannot create social changes on their own.

  2. wael ghonim

    jan25

    facebook

    twitter

    egypt

  1. I was writing with my heart, not my keyboard. I was writing what I felt should be written.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, Internet activist Wael Ghonim talks about how his Facebook page helped start Egypt’s revolution.

  2. wael ghonim

    egypt

    tahrir square

    twitter

    facebook

    jan25

  1. The protests that led to the Egyptian revolution, were organized in part by an anonymous Facebook user. When the police found out who he was, they arrested and interrogated him. Now, Wael Ghonim is internationally famous. On tomorrow’s Fresh Air, we talk to Wael Ghonim about revolutions, Egypt, and social media.
(Tweet from Ghonim last Jan. Complete Storify to acclimate yourself.) View in High-Res

    The protests that led to the Egyptian revolution, were organized in part by an anonymous Facebook user. When the police found out who he was, they arrested and interrogated him. Now, Wael Ghonim is internationally famous. On tomorrow’s Fresh Air, we talk to Wael Ghonim about revolutions, Egypt, and social media.

    (Tweet from Ghonim last Jan. Complete Storify to acclimate yourself.)

  2. ghonim

    egypt

    social media

    twitter

  1. a map of people in chicago going to work and then going home via their geotagged tweets (via gapersblock)
Is this the structure of Chicago? (by Eric Fischer)

    a map of people in chicago going to work and then going home via their geotagged tweets (via gapersblock)

    Is this the structure of Chicago? (by Eric Fischer)

  2. twitter

    geotagging

    maps

  1. I think for me Twitter is the equivalent of working in an office and having those casual conversations that make … you feel less isolated in the course of writing.

    — Susan Orlean on her constant Twittering. [This is what I use Tumblr for.]

  2. susan orlean

    twitter

    rin tin tin

    @susanorlean

  1. The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism looked at how mainstream media outlets use Twitter.

    The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism looked at how mainstream media outlets use Twitter.

  2. twitter

    media

    pew

  1. Posted on 6 September, 2011

    2,570 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from newyorker

    If you’re in college/grad school/high school, you might want to look through our archives if you’re writing a research paper this year. I never thought to go to NPR as a source when writing/researching in college, but all the transcripts are up and searchable. (primary sources FTW!) Plus, you can embed audio in a powerpoint presentation, which should go over nicely.           (cartoon via newyorker)

    If you’re in college/grad school/high school, you might want to look through our archives if you’re writing a research paper this year. I never thought to go to NPR as a source when writing/researching in college, but all the transcripts are up and searchable. (primary sources FTW!) Plus, you can embed audio in a powerpoint presentation, which should go over nicely.           (cartoon via newyorker)

  2. Cartoon

    Cartoons

    School

    Twitter

    education

    archive

  1. Posted on 24 August, 2011

    2,399 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from miguelrios

    miguelrios:

    Below is a visual of the Tweets from VA and Washington, DC one minute after the August 23 #earthquake.

  2. earthquake

    twitter

    infographic