1. Today’s interview is with Tim Arango, the Baghdad Bureau Chief for the New York Times.  Arango has been reporting from Iraq for nearly five years, and has served as bureau chief since 2011, the year the U.S. completed its troop withdrawal from Iraq.  He’s watched the rise of the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, and he’s covered the Iraqi government, which under the leadership of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, was seen as corrupt and sectarian, persecuting Sunnis. 
 

TERRY GROSS: Do you think that ISIS would’ve existited if not for the American invasion of Iraq?
TIM ARANGO: No, absolutely not. 
GROSS: How did the American invasion help create ISIS?
ARANGO: The Americans come to invade Iraq and I think it’s partly because the Sunnis are going to be out of power. The Americans come in and topple Saddam Hussein, who was Sunni, and there’s been a Sunni elite governing Iraq for centuries and they come in, the Sunnis realize they’re going to be left out of this, they’re not going to be running the country anymore, so resistance movements sprung up. The other thing the Americans did was disbanding the Iraqi army which created a whole group of would-be potential insurgents. So al-Qaida in Iraq is formed and many of the things that the Maliki government has done to alienate Sunnis they learned from the Americans. The Americans taught them how to exclude Sunnis from political life with de-Baathification and things like that. The other thing Maliki has done is these mass arrests of Sunni men and of suspected terrorists and that’s exactly what the Americans did. So as the Americans tried to fight these guys they would do these mass arrests and they could put them in places like [U.S. detention facility] Camp Bucca, most of the leaders of ISIS were in Camp Bucca and they got know each other, they got to plan, they got to hang out, and so every turn in the Iraq story now is the American legacy and the epic American failure in Iraq.



Photo:  Kurdish pesh merga fighters on Tuesday battled ISIS at a point east of Mosul secured with the help of United States airstrikes. Credit:  Jm Lopez/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images View in High-Res

    Today’s interview is with Tim Arango, the Baghdad Bureau Chief for the New York Times.  Arango has been reporting from Iraq for nearly five years, and has served as bureau chief since 2011, the year the U.S. completed its troop withdrawal from Iraq.  He’s watched the rise of the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, and he’s covered the Iraqi government, which under the leadership of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, was seen as corrupt and sectarian, persecuting Sunnis. 

     

    TERRY GROSS: Do you think that ISIS would’ve existited if not for the American invasion of Iraq?

    TIM ARANGO: No, absolutely not. 

    GROSS: How did the American invasion help create ISIS?

    ARANGO: The Americans come to invade Iraq and I think it’s partly because the Sunnis are going to be out of power. The Americans come in and topple Saddam Hussein, who was Sunni, and there’s been a Sunni elite governing Iraq for centuries and they come in, the Sunnis realize they’re going to be left out of this, they’re not going to be running the country anymore, so resistance movements sprung up. The other thing the Americans did was disbanding the Iraqi army which created a whole group of would-be potential insurgents. So al-Qaida in Iraq is formed and many of the things that the Maliki government has done to alienate Sunnis they learned from the Americans. The Americans taught them how to exclude Sunnis from political life with de-Baathification and things like that. The other thing Maliki has done is these mass arrests of Sunni men and of suspected terrorists and that’s exactly what the Americans did. So as the Americans tried to fight these guys they would do these mass arrests and they could put them in places like [U.S. detention facility] Camp Bucca, most of the leaders of ISIS were in Camp Bucca and they got know each other, they got to plan, they got to hang out, and so every turn in the Iraq story now is the American legacy and the epic American failure in Iraq.

    Photo:  Kurdish pesh merga fighters on Tuesday battled ISIS at a point east of Mosul secured with the help of United States airstrikes. 
    Credit:  Jm Lopez/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

  2. ISIS

    Iraq

    new york times

    tim arango

    fresh air

    interview

  1. thepoliticalnotebook:

This is Samar Hassan, now 12 years old. She was the screaming 5-year old girl in the striking photo taken by the late Chris Hondros, a photo that has become emblematic of the Iraq war.  She had never seen the famous photo of her, blood-spattered, the  night her parents were killed by American soldiers in Tal Afar in 2005.  She now lives in Mosul, with her older sister and her sister’s husband.  

The photograph of Samar is frozen in history, but her life moved on, across a trajectory that is emblematic of what so many Iraqis have endured. In a country whose health care system has almost no ability to treat the psychological aspects of trauma, thousands of Iraqis are left alone with their torment.

Read more at the New York Times. 
(Photo Credit: Ayman Oghanna for The New York Times)

On today’s Fresh Air, reporter Tim Arango talks about tracking down Samar Hassan View in High-Res

    thepoliticalnotebook:

    This is Samar Hassan, now 12 years old. She was the screaming 5-year old girl in the striking photo taken by the late Chris Hondros, a photo that has become emblematic of the Iraq war.  She had never seen the famous photo of her, blood-spattered, the  night her parents were killed by American soldiers in Tal Afar in 2005.  She now lives in Mosul, with her older sister and her sister’s husband.  

    The photograph of Samar is frozen in history, but her life moved on, across a trajectory that is emblematic of what so many Iraqis have endured. In a country whose health care system has almost no ability to treat the psychological aspects of trauma, thousands of Iraqis are left alone with their torment.

    Read more at the New York Times

    (Photo Credit: Ayman Oghanna for The New York Times)

    On today’s Fresh Air, reporter Tim Arango talks about tracking down Samar Hassan

  2. tim arango

    iraq

    samar hassan

  1. We have [the troops] leaving at a time when just about everybody involved in the discussion — from the American military leaders to the Iraqi military leaders — did not think it was a good idea that all the troops leave — that Iraq is not ready for that.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, we talk to New York Times Baghdad Bureau Chief Tim Arango about what happens to the country after U.S. troops leave at the end of next month. 

  2. tim arango

    iraq

    middle east

    military

  1. Tomorrow: We talk with Tim Arango, the Baghdad Bureau Chief for The New York Times, about the future of Iraq and what will happen when the troops are gone. View in High-Res

    Tomorrow: We talk with Tim Arango, the Baghdad Bureau Chief for The New York Times, about the future of Iraq and what will happen when the troops are gone.

  2. tim arango

    new york times

    iraq