1. thepoliticalnotebook:

This is Samar Hassan, now 12 years old. She was the screaming 5-year old girl in the striking photo taken by the late Chris Hondros, a photo that has become emblematic of the Iraq war.  She had never seen the famous photo of her, blood-spattered, the  night her parents were killed by American soldiers in Tal Afar in 2005.  She now lives in Mosul, with her older sister and her sister’s husband.  

The photograph of Samar is frozen in history, but her life moved on, across a trajectory that is emblematic of what so many Iraqis have endured. In a country whose health care system has almost no ability to treat the psychological aspects of trauma, thousands of Iraqis are left alone with their torment.

Read more at the New York Times. 
(Photo Credit: Ayman Oghanna for The New York Times)

On today’s Fresh Air, reporter Tim Arango talks about tracking down Samar Hassan View in High-Res

    thepoliticalnotebook:

    This is Samar Hassan, now 12 years old. She was the screaming 5-year old girl in the striking photo taken by the late Chris Hondros, a photo that has become emblematic of the Iraq war.  She had never seen the famous photo of her, blood-spattered, the  night her parents were killed by American soldiers in Tal Afar in 2005.  She now lives in Mosul, with her older sister and her sister’s husband.  

    The photograph of Samar is frozen in history, but her life moved on, across a trajectory that is emblematic of what so many Iraqis have endured. In a country whose health care system has almost no ability to treat the psychological aspects of trauma, thousands of Iraqis are left alone with their torment.

    Read more at the New York Times

    (Photo Credit: Ayman Oghanna for The New York Times)

    On today’s Fresh Air, reporter Tim Arango talks about tracking down Samar Hassan

  2. tim arango

    iraq

    samar hassan

  1. We have [the troops] leaving at a time when just about everybody involved in the discussion — from the American military leaders to the Iraqi military leaders — did not think it was a good idea that all the troops leave — that Iraq is not ready for that.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, we talk to New York Times Baghdad Bureau Chief Tim Arango about what happens to the country after U.S. troops leave at the end of next month. 

  2. tim arango

    iraq

    middle east

    military

  1. Tomorrow: We talk with Tim Arango, the Baghdad Bureau Chief for The New York Times, about the future of Iraq and what will happen when the troops are gone. View in High-Res

    Tomorrow: We talk with Tim Arango, the Baghdad Bureau Chief for The New York Times, about the future of Iraq and what will happen when the troops are gone.

  2. tim arango

    new york times

    iraq