1. Critic at large John Powers reviews  The Trip to Italy, the follow-up to 2010’s The Trip, starring British comedians Steve Coogan (right) and Rob Brydon:

Now, The Trip to Italy isn’t exactly freighted with ambition. Featuring lots of shots of tasty food and nifty suites, it’s partly a huge ad for the hotels and restaurants that Coogan and Brydon visit. No matter. What I find appealing about these films is their sloping, improvisational air, their quality of catching a moment of life on the wing, as when Brydon startles Coogan with a joke so good he can’t stop himself from laughing.
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    Critic at large John Powers reviews  The Trip to Italy, the follow-up to 2010’s The Trip, starring British comedians Steve Coogan (right) and Rob Brydon:

    Now, The Trip to Italy isn’t exactly freighted with ambition. Featuring lots of shots of tasty food and nifty suites, it’s partly a huge ad for the hotels and restaurants that Coogan and Brydon visit. No matter. What I find appealing about these films is their sloping, improvisational air, their quality of catching a moment of life on the wing, as when Brydon startles Coogan with a joke so good he can’t stop himself from laughing.

  2. the trip to italy

    the trip

    BBC

    steve coogan

    rob brydon

  1. Which celebrity voices can you hear in your head?

    After seeing The Trip, our critic-at-large John Powers has this to say:

    The Trip got me thinking about which of today’s movie voices I can instantly hear in my mind’s ear — Woody Allen and Clint Eastwood and Morgan Freeman. Which is to say, old guys, like Connery and Caine. As for the young ones, can you “hear” Brad Pitt’s voice right now, or Angelina Jolie’s? This year’s Oscar winner Natalie Portman is a superb actress, but I can’t remember what she sounds like as I can with Bette Davis, Lucille Ball or Marilyn Monroe.

    Which celebrity voices can you instantly hear in your head?

  2. john powers

    the trip

    mimicry

    impersonation

    voices

  1. British comedian Steve Coogan on today’s Fresh Air: "Being creative means, some of the things that bother you stop bothering  you because you exploit them creatively. So it’s a kind of a strange  process but you need to have hang-ups and neuroses to be creative. If  you’re just in a state of nirvana, you’re not going to be very  interesting or funny." View in High-Res

    British comedian Steve Coogan on today’s Fresh Air: "Being creative means, some of the things that bother you stop bothering you because you exploit them creatively. So it’s a kind of a strange process but you need to have hang-ups and neuroses to be creative. If you’re just in a state of nirvana, you’re not going to be very interesting or funny."

  2. steve coogan

    british comedy

    the trip