1. Did you catch the Colbert Report last night? There was a steamy appearance by our lady, Terry Gross. (It starts around 3 min into the episode) 
Stephen and Terry have talked many times, but here’s the latest one.  View in High-Res

    Did you catch the Colbert Report last night? There was a steamy appearance by our lady, Terry Gross. (It starts around 3 min into the episode) 

    Stephen and Terry have talked many times, but here’s the latest one

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  1. Stephan Eirik Clark's debut novel, Sweetness #9, is about a flavor chemist who develops an artificial sweetener that causes anxiety, rage, obesity and depression. Clark tells Terry Gross that the book Fast Food Nation inspired him to set his story in the food industry: 

"Flavorings were like gravity or electricity — something that was all around me, but that I had never paid any attention to, and as soon as I read that book and its chapter on food product design, I started to ask myself, ‘How important are these to the foods?’ I started to question if I was really eating food or just the idea of food. With these molecules, you can make something taste like grass or roasted chicken and what is it covering up? What is it supporting? What is it enhancing? All of these questions and philosophical ideas that sprang out of this simple industry just went off — and I found myself deep into a novel."


View in High-Res

    Stephan Eirik Clark's debut novel, Sweetness #9, is about a flavor chemist who develops an artificial sweetener that causes anxiety, rage, obesity and depression. Clark tells Terry Gross that the book Fast Food Nation inspired him to set his story in the food industry: 

    "Flavorings were like gravity or electricity — something that was all around me, but that I had never paid any attention to, and as soon as I read that book and its chapter on food product design, I started to ask myself, ‘How important are these to the foods?’ I started to question if I was really eating food or just the idea of food. With these molecules, you can make something taste like grass or roasted chicken and what is it covering up? What is it supporting? What is it enhancing? All of these questions and philosophical ideas that sprang out of this simple industry just went off — and I found myself deep into a novel."

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    chemistry

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    stephen colbert

  1. Big news: CBS just announced Stephen Colbert will replace David Letterman on The Late Show next year. Thoughts?

    You can hear the 2012 Fresh Air interview here

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    the late show

    the colbert report

    fresh air

    interview

    terry gross

  1. Fresh Air TV critic David Bianculli reviews last night’s premiere of the Tonight Show starring Jimmy Fallon: 

On last night’s opening show alone, the featured guests were Will Smith and U-2, but there were enough cameos to make it feel like an event called “Celebrities on Parade.” Seated at his desk after his opening monologue, Jimmy Fallon joked that one of his buddies, who bet that Jimmy would never host The Tonight Show, owed him a hundred dollars. To the delight of the crowd, Robert De Niro came out unannounced from behind the curtain, slammed a $100 bill down on Fallon’s desk, then exited without saying a word. After that, doing the same thing in rapid succession, so did Tina Fey. Joe Namath. And a string of others, from Mariah Carey, Joan Rivers and Seth Rogen to Sarah Jessica Parker, Mike Tyson and Lady Gaga. And then, as the capper, Stephen Colbert came out, with a bucketful of pennies which he poured all over Jimmy Fallon, while taking a Selfie and giving him an appropriate welcome for someone who’s a new competitor in his Colbert Report time slot. 
"Welcome to 11:30, bitch," Colbert said. 


image via CNN View in High-Res

    Fresh Air TV critic David Bianculli reviews last night’s premiere of the Tonight Show starring Jimmy Fallon

    On last night’s opening show alone, the featured guests were Will Smith and U-2, but there were enough cameos to make it feel like an event called “Celebrities on Parade.” Seated at his desk after his opening monologue, Jimmy Fallon joked that one of his buddies, who bet that Jimmy would never host The Tonight Show, owed him a hundred dollars. To the delight of the crowd, Robert De Niro came out unannounced from behind the curtain, slammed a $100 bill down on Fallon’s desk, then exited without saying a word. After that, doing the same thing in rapid succession, so did Tina Fey. Joe Namath. And a string of others, from Mariah Carey, Joan Rivers and Seth Rogen to Sarah Jessica Parker, Mike Tyson and Lady Gaga. And then, as the capper, Stephen Colbert came out, with a bucketful of pennies which he poured all over Jimmy Fallon, while taking a Selfie and giving him an appropriate welcome for someone who’s a new competitor in his Colbert Report time slot.

    "Welcome to 11:30, bitch," Colbert said.

    image via CNN

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  1. Pussy Riot members Maria Alyokhina (left) and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova were on the Colbert Report last night. Watch the interview here (in two parts). They share their views on Vladimir Putin’s anti-gay laws as well as their global campaign for better prison conditions.

Side note: Imagine the task of translating Stephen Colbert into Russian…

A little while back we spoke to Russian journalist Masha Gessen, author of the book Words Will Break Cement: The Passion of Pussy Riot, about these issues. Here Gessen tells us about the conditions Tolokonnikova was subjected to:

"What had happened at her penal colony was that the sewing factory that has served as the lifeblood of every women’s penitentiary institution in Russia, and many of the men’s ones, was taking on more and more orders, so the inmates were forced to work longer and longer hours. By the end of the summer, the workday was about 17 hours, so they were allowed to sleep about four hours a night, if that. They wouldn’t get days off except maybe every six weeks or so. So they were incredibly sleep deprived. The working conditions were very unsafe and they were also … fed very, very poorly in the prison colony.
So Nadezhda decided to protest first inside the prison by going to complain to the warden and saying that they needed to return the workday to the legal limit of eight hours. In response, he threatened her with murder.”


Gessen’s interview also touches on the upcoming Sochi Olympics. Check it out. View in High-Res

    Pussy Riot members Maria Alyokhina (left) and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova were on the Colbert Report last night. Watch the interview here (in two parts). They share their views on Vladimir Putin’s anti-gay laws as well as their global campaign for better prison conditions.

    Side note: Imagine the task of translating Stephen Colbert into Russian…

    A little while back we spoke to Russian journalist Masha Gessen, author of the book Words Will Break Cement: The Passion of Pussy Riot, about these issues. Here Gessen tells us about the conditions Tolokonnikova was subjected to:

    "What had happened at her penal colony was that the sewing factory that has served as the lifeblood of every women’s penitentiary institution in Russia, and many of the men’s ones, was taking on more and more orders, so the inmates were forced to work longer and longer hours. By the end of the summer, the workday was about 17 hours, so they were allowed to sleep about four hours a night, if that. They wouldn’t get days off except maybe every six weeks or so. So they were incredibly sleep deprived. The working conditions were very unsafe and they were also … fed very, very poorly in the prison colony.

    So Nadezhda decided to protest first inside the prison by going to complain to the warden and saying that they needed to return the workday to the legal limit of eight hours. In response, he threatened her with murder.”

    Gessen’s interview also touches on the upcoming Sochi Olympics. Check it out.

  2. interview

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    colbert report

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    masha gessen

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  1. Stephen Colbert starred in Stephen Sondheim's “Company" (with Martha Plimpton and Neil Patrick-Harris). On Fresh Air today Colbert explains how Sondheim sent him a letter asking him if he would be in the production:  

[He said that] against his instincts, he had a good time on my show [The Colbert Report] and would I consider playing Harry in Company? And he ended the letter with the sentence ‘You have a perfect voice for musical theater.’ And I read it to my wife and she said, ‘Boy, you have to do this. No one, let alone Stephen Sondheim is going to ask you to do Sondheim.’ And I said, ‘You’re right, I have to do it.’ 

You can watch Colbert in Company tonight on PBS Great Performances View in High-Res

    Stephen Colbert starred in Stephen Sondheim's “Company" (with Martha Plimpton and Neil Patrick-Harris). On Fresh Air today Colbert explains how Sondheim sent him a letter asking him if he would be in the production: 

    [He said that] against his instincts, he had a good time on my show [The Colbert Report] and would I consider playing Harry in Company? And he ended the letter with the sentence ‘You have a perfect voice for musical theater.’ And I read it to my wife and she said, ‘Boy, you have to do this. No one, let alone Stephen Sondheim is going to ask you to do Sondheim.’ And I said, ‘You’re right, I have to do it.’

    You can watch Colbert in Company tonight on PBS Great Performances

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  1. Posted on 7 November, 2013

    230 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from gggfunny

    Tomorrow: Stephen Colbert talks about doing his show, The Colbert Report, in character:

And so I look at every guest as a guest — they’re a guest in my home, and I am grateful that they would come here. And I hope people have a good time, and if they don’t, it’s my fault, or rather, it’s my responsibility. Because if I actually get into an aggressive discussion with a guest about something … and I’m expressing my disagreement satirically, and if they don’t enjoy that, that’s OK, because I have a responsibility for what I’m saying.


Colbert also stars in the Stephen Sondheim musical Company, airing 11/8 on the PBS “Great Performances” series. View in High-Res

    Tomorrow: Stephen Colbert talks about doing his show, The Colbert Report, in character:

    And so I look at every guest as a guest — they’re a guest in my home, and I am grateful that they would come here. And I hope people have a good time, and if they don’t, it’s my fault, or rather, it’s my responsibility. Because if I actually get into an aggressive discussion with a guest about something … and I’m expressing my disagreement satirically, and if they don’t enjoy that, that’s OK, because I have a responsibility for what I’m saying.

    Colbert also stars in the Stephen Sondheim musical Company, airing 11/8 on the PBS “Great Performances” series.

  2. fresh air

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  1. High five! It’s the weekend.
Have a great one.
Love,
Fresh Air

Gif via giphy

    High five! It’s the weekend.

    Have a great one.

    Love,

    Fresh Air

    Gif via giphy

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  1. Stephen Colbert on the parallels between Elvis Costello’s relationship with Bruce Springsteen and Colbert’s relationship with Jon Stewart:





[Elvis Costello] was trying when he was younger to try to write Bruce Springsteen songs — and that he really liked Bruce Springsteen’s sound. And he said, but then he eventually stopped doing that because he would try to write these songs like Bruce Springsteen and he would end up writing things that were a little bit wry, sardonic or even character-based. And they didn’t have that sort of sincere, anthemic quality that Bruce’s songs sometimes have. And that kind of blew me away, because he’s describing his relation to Bruce Springsteen kind of like my relationship to Jon Stewart. And Jon’s favorite artist is Bruce Springsteen, and my favorite rock artist is probably Elvis Costello. So there’s an odd parallel between Elvis’ evolution from what he was trying to do like Bruce and my evolution from what I was trying to do when I worked with Jon.




View in High-Res

    Stephen Colbert on the parallels between Elvis Costello’s relationship with Bruce Springsteen and Colbert’s relationship with Jon Stewart:

    [Elvis Costello] was trying when he was younger to try to write Bruce Springsteen songs — and that he really liked Bruce Springsteen’s sound. And he said, but then he eventually stopped doing that because he would try to write these songs like Bruce Springsteen and he would end up writing things that were a little bit wry, sardonic or even character-based. And they didn’t have that sort of sincere, anthemic quality that Bruce’s songs sometimes have. And that kind of blew me away, because he’s describing his relation to Bruce Springsteen kind of like my relationship to Jon Stewart. And Jon’s favorite artist is Bruce Springsteen, and my favorite rock artist is probably Elvis Costello. So there’s an odd parallel between Elvis’ evolution from what he was trying to do like Bruce and my evolution from what I was trying to do when I worked with Jon.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Stephen Colbert

    Bruce Springsteen

    Elvis Costello

    Jon Stewart

  1. Stephen Colbert on why he loves “The Best Imitation of Myself” from Ben Folds Five:

    When I first heard the song just a few years ago, I just thought he had written it for me. But then when I listened to it more, I thought it’s just a beautiful expression of how we are toward each other as people. We don’t think that we are sufficient for each other - that no one wants to know the real me or the whole me.  I just want to give you the part of me that I think you expect to see from me. And almost as if that little part of me is more than the whole of me because I don’t want to give you any of the poison. 

  2. Stephen Colbert

    Ben Folds Five

    Fresh Air

  1. Stephen Colbert on the parallel between Elvis Costello’s relationship with Bruce Springsteen and Colbert’s relationship with Jon Steward:

[Elvis Costello] was trying when he was younger to try to write Bruce Springsteen songs — and that he really liked Bruce Springsteen’s sound. And he said but then he eventually stopped doing that because he would try write these songs like Bruce Springsteen and he would end up writing things that were a little bit wry, sardonic, or even character-based. And they didn’t have that sort of sincere, anthemic quality that Bruce’s songs sometimes has. And that kind of blew me away because he’s describing his relation to Bruce Springsteen kind of like my relationship to Jon Stewart. And Jon’s favorite artist is Bruce Springsteen and my favorite rock artist is probably Elvis Costello. So there’s an odd parallel between Elvis’ evolution from what he was trying to do like Bruce and my evolution from what I was trying to do when I worked with Jon.
View in High-Res

    Stephen Colbert on the parallel between Elvis Costello’s relationship with Bruce Springsteen and Colbert’s relationship with Jon Steward:

    [Elvis Costello] was trying when he was younger to try to write Bruce Springsteen songs — and that he really liked Bruce Springsteen’s sound. And he said but then he eventually stopped doing that because he would try write these songs like Bruce Springsteen and he would end up writing things that were a little bit wry, sardonic, or even character-based. And they didn’t have that sort of sincere, anthemic quality that Bruce’s songs sometimes has. And that kind of blew me away because he’s describing his relation to Bruce Springsteen kind of like my relationship to Jon Stewart. And Jon’s favorite artist is Bruce Springsteen and my favorite rock artist is probably Elvis Costello. So there’s an odd parallel between Elvis’ evolution from what he was trying to do like Bruce and my evolution from what I was trying to do when I worked with Jon.

  2. Stephen Colbert

    Elvis Costello

    Bruce Springsteen

    Jon Stewart

    Fresh Air

  1. Stephen Colbert on why King Herod’s song from Jesus Christ Superstar made a big impression on him when he was young:

    That’s a theatrical expression of contempt and that opened my eyes as a kid - that you could actually be, well you could be wrong in character, you could be blasphemous in character. And it doesn’t negate how you feel about subject.

  2. Stephen Colbert

    Jesus Christ Superstar

    King Herod's Song

    Fresh Air

  1. Today’s show: Stephen Colbert not only sings a few bars of songs that have influenced him, he also plays a few recordings he loves and tells us why.

    Also… we talk to Tom Wolfe about his new novel, Back to Blood.

  2. Stephen Colbert

    Tom Wolfe

    Fresh Air

  1. I’m hoping Mitt Romney can get his act together in this debate because as a conservative pundit, or rather, playing a conserve pundit…it’s so difficult for me right now to get behind Mitt Romney. It’s incredibly frustrating as a performer who has to model behavior that is so schizophrenic and bifurcated because it’s almost an unprecedented candidacy – as far as I can tell. No one seems to like him – even the people who are behind him. There isn’t a sort of monolithic point of view to base my own satire on.

    Basically, the satire of my character in relation to Mitt Romney now is night to night, I can change my mind and I can be hopeful or in despair from night to night because I have no point of reference for what’s happening now. Even McCain in 2008 post-Lehman Brothers might have seemed like a bit of a winged duck, but people still liked him. People were still behind him.

    You get a feeling that everybody of the sort that I’m modeling really has one foot out of the boat right now and I really I hope Mitt – I mean listen I have my own political views, but as a performer I hope he does something positive tonight so that there’s something for me to rally behind because that’s what my character wants to do… He wants to have a champion that he can champion and that just doesn’t exist in Mitt Romney right now. He’s just a walking wound.

    — Stephen Colbert on how his character wants Mitt Romney to do well in the presidential debate in Denver

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  1. Stephen Colbert on creating his Super PAC

The whole thing came about by accident. We were just trying to do a parody ad of a Tim Pawlenty ad, and I couldn’t figure out how to end it. And then I said, ‘Well how does his ad end?’ And his ad ended with just a simple card on the screen that said, ‘LibertyPAC.com’ — whatever his political action committee was. And I said, ‘Okay, just put a ColbertPAC.com at the end and one person on the staff said, ‘Do you want me to buy that url?’ And I said, ‘Yeah, yeah — we might want to use that later.’
And then the network called and said, ‘Are you really going to get a PAC?’ And I said, ‘Why do you ask?’ And they said, ‘Because if you actually get a PAC, that could be trouble.’ And I said, ‘Well then I’m definitely going to do it.’ Because I like the idea of, why is it trouble? Everybody can do it, why can’t I do it? … We’d done jokes on Citizens United for about a year, and then I realized, ‘Oh, well this is what the whole year is about. It’s really about this whole new flush of cash into our political system that is in large part untraceable or traceable only after the fact when it’s too late, after the primaries, after the elections is over. And I said, ‘OK, well let’s just try to do it’…
We really played the game hard up through the South Carolina primary, when Jon Stewart took over my Super PAC, because I announced my plans to form an exploratory committee about whether or not I should run for president, to illustrate how easy it is to give money to somebody else and really have control over what happens. Ostensibly it’s no longer in your control, but you’ve given it to your best friend, who actually rides to work with you this morning and you share a building.
View in High-Res

    Stephen Colbert on creating his Super PAC

    The whole thing came about by accident. We were just trying to do a parody ad of a Tim Pawlenty ad, and I couldn’t figure out how to end it. And then I said, ‘Well how does his ad end?’ And his ad ended with just a simple card on the screen that said, ‘LibertyPAC.com’ — whatever his political action committee was. And I said, ‘Okay, just put a ColbertPAC.com at the end and one person on the staff said, ‘Do you want me to buy that url?’ And I said, ‘Yeah, yeah — we might want to use that later.’

    And then the network called and said, ‘Are you really going to get a PAC?’ And I said, ‘Why do you ask?’ And they said, ‘Because if you actually get a PAC, that could be trouble.’ And I said, ‘Well then I’m definitely going to do it.’ Because I like the idea of, why is it trouble? Everybody can do it, why can’t I do it? … We’d done jokes on Citizens United for about a year, and then I realized, ‘Oh, well this is what the whole year is about. It’s really about this whole new flush of cash into our political system that is in large part untraceable or traceable only after the fact when it’s too late, after the primaries, after the elections is over. And I said, ‘OK, well let’s just try to do it’…

    We really played the game hard up through the South Carolina primary, when Jon Stewart took over my Super PAC, because I announced my plans to form an exploratory committee about whether or not I should run for president, to illustrate how easy it is to give money to somebody else and really have control over what happens. Ostensibly it’s no longer in your control, but you’ve given it to your best friend, who actually rides to work with you this morning and you share a building.

  2. Stephen Colbert

    Super PAC

    Fresh Air