1. As the great, great grandson of Texas slaveholders, Chris Tomlinson wanted to find out what crimes his ancestors had committed to maintain their power and privilege.   In his new book Tomlinson Hill, he writes about the slave-owning part of his family tree.  He also writes about slaves who kept the Tomlinson name after they were freed, and traces their lineage.  
Chris Tomlinson says that he intended the book to examine America’s history of race and bigotry through the paternal lines of these two families.  Tomlinson is a journalist who spent 11 years with the associated press, reporting on wars and conflicts, mostly in Africa, including the end of apartheid and the aftermath of the Rwandan genocide.  All the conflicts he covered included an element of bigotry:    


"It was inspiring to me to be in South Africa after the election [of Nelson Mandela] and to see that reckoning. Bishop Desmond Tutu established the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and at the time his argument was that before there can be reconciliation, you have to have a sharing of the truth and it has to be a common truth. One community can’t have one idea of what happened and the other community … a different idea. If you want them to reconcile, they have to agree about what happened. And that requires — for lack of a better word — confession and contrition.
…I don’t think that’s something that’s happened in the United States. And it certainly didn’t happen in my life. And so writing this book was my opportunity to go through that process — if, for no one else, [than] for the African-American Tomlinsons and my side of the family, that we have that truth and reconciliation.”


Photo of Tomlinson Hill plantation sign, via Chris Tomlinson/ Lisa Kaselak, Fosforo Films  View in High-Res

    As the great, great grandson of Texas slaveholders, Chris Tomlinson wanted to find out what crimes his ancestors had committed to maintain their power and privilege.   In his new book Tomlinson Hill, he writes about the slave-owning part of his family tree.  He also writes about slaves who kept the Tomlinson name after they were freed, and traces their lineage.  

    Chris Tomlinson says that he intended the book to examine America’s history of race and bigotry through the paternal lines of these two families.  Tomlinson is a journalist who spent 11 years with the associated press, reporting on wars and conflicts, mostly in Africa, including the end of apartheid and the aftermath of the Rwandan genocide.  All the conflicts he covered included an element of bigotry:    

    "It was inspiring to me to be in South Africa after the election [of Nelson Mandela] and to see that reckoning. Bishop Desmond Tutu established the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and at the time his argument was that before there can be reconciliation, you have to have a sharing of the truth and it has to be a common truth. One community can’t have one idea of what happened and the other community … a different idea. If you want them to reconcile, they have to agree about what happened. And that requires — for lack of a better word — confession and contrition.

    …I don’t think that’s something that’s happened in the United States. And it certainly didn’t happen in my life. And so writing this book was my opportunity to go through that process — if, for no one else, [than] for the African-American Tomlinsons and my side of the family, that we have that truth and reconciliation.”

    Photo of Tomlinson Hill plantation sign, via Chris Tomlinson/ Lisa Kaselak, Fosforo Films 

  2. slavery

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  1. "I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear."  - Nelson Mandela 
 
Today is Nelson Mandela Day, marked by his birthday. This is the first Mandela Day since his death last December.  View in High-Res

    "I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear."  - Nelson Mandela 

     

    Today is Nelson Mandela Day, marked by his birthday. This is the first Mandela Day since his death last December. 

  2. nelson mandela

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  1. Nadine Gordimer, a Nobel Prize-winning author known for her portrayals of South Africa under apartheid, passed away yesterday at the age of 90.
Gordimer spoke to Fresh Air in 1989. You can hear our tribute to her here. 

    Nadine Gordimer, a Nobel Prize-winning author known for her portrayals of South Africa under apartheid, passed away yesterday at the age of 90.

    Gordimer spoke to Fresh Air in 1989. You can hear our tribute to her here

  2. nadine gordimer

    apartheid

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    writing

  1. 
"To this day, the singer’s visual signature is the elaborate topknots in his hair. On Shaka Bundu, his aural signature is his party vibe — hearty but not frantic, more plain sexy than raunchy. And the whole album keeps coming up with fresh variations, such as the title track.”

Milo Miles reviews the re-release of South African artist Penny Penny’s 1994 album Shaka Bundu.

image via rolling stone 

    "To this day, the singer’s visual signature is the elaborate topknots in his hair. On Shaka Bundu, his aural signature is his party vibe — hearty but not frantic, more plain sexy than raunchy. And the whole album keeps coming up with fresh variations, such as the title track.”

    Milo Miles reviews the re-release of South African artist Penny Penny’s 1994 album Shaka Bundu.

    image via rolling stone 

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  1. Nelson Mandela 1918-2013


As a tribute to Nelson Mandela, NPR has compiled music that captures his legacy:
The Mandela Playlist: A Life And Legacy, Told In Music View in High-Res

    Nelson Mandela 1918-2013

    As a tribute to Nelson Mandela, NPR has compiled music that captures his legacy:

    The Mandela Playlist: A Life And Legacy, Told In Music

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    south african music

    npr

  1. Today Matthew Hart, author of Gold: The Race for the World’s Most Seductive Metal speaks to Terry Gross about the economic, environmental, and ethical implications of the commodification of GOLD.

He begins his investigation by visiting the Mponeng gold mine outside of Johannesburg in South Africa. While it is not the largest or deepest mine in the world, it is the deepest man made hole on earth:

It’s about 2.5 miles deep and it is, in fact, a hellish place to work. But I’ll give you a couple of facts:
… If you were standing at the bottom of that mine and looking towards the top, you would have towering above you a swath of ground and tunnels and shoots … about the size of Manhattan, taken from Midtown to the top of Central Park. … And every morning 4,000 men piled into it and go down into, many of them, to the very deepest levels to work.


image of Mponeng mine from the New York Times View in High-Res

    Today Matthew Hart, author of Gold: The Race for the World’s Most Seductive Metal speaks to Terry Gross about the economic, environmental, and ethical implications of the commodification of GOLD.

    He begins his investigation by visiting the Mponeng gold mine outside of Johannesburg in South Africa. While it is not the largest or deepest mine in the world, it is the deepest man made hole on earth:

    It’s about 2.5 miles deep and it is, in fact, a hellish place to work. But I’ll give you a couple of facts:

    … If you were standing at the bottom of that mine and looking towards the top, you would have towering above you a swath of ground and tunnels and shoots … about the size of Manhattan, taken from Midtown to the top of Central Park. … And every morning 4,000 men piled into it and go down into, many of them, to the very deepest levels to work.

    image of Mponeng mine from the New York Times

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  1. South African trumpeter and band leader Hugh Masekela has released more than 30 albums since his American debut in 1961. The concept behind his latest album, Jabulani, is deceptively simple. It’s a collection of South African wedding songs which Masekela remembers vividly from his youth. View in High-Res

    South African trumpeter and band leader Hugh Masekela has released more than 30 albums since his American debut in 1961. The concept behind his latest album, Jabulani, is deceptively simple. It’s a collection of South African wedding songs which Masekela remembers vividly from his youth.

  2. Hugh Masekela

    south africa

    wedding

    music

  1. Combat photographer Joao Silva, on voyeurism: “Somehow the camera gives us access to the most intimate moments in peoples’ lives. And you do feel out of place when you’re photographing a mother cradling a dead son or whatever the case may be. Or a young Marine helping an injured friend — you do feel like you’re somewhat out of place. But at the same time, you know that it’s important to do it. It’s what you’re doing there. Otherwise, stay home and hang out with your Playstation.” View in High-Res

    Combat photographer Joao Silva, on voyeurism: “Somehow the camera gives us access to the most intimate moments in peoples’ lives. And you do feel out of place when you’re photographing a mother cradling a dead son or whatever the case may be. Or a young Marine helping an injured friend — you do feel like you’re somewhat out of place. But at the same time, you know that it’s important to do it. It’s what you’re doing there. Otherwise, stay home and hang out with your Playstation.”

  2. joao silva

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  1. foreversavage:

Kudzanai Chiurai. (Zimbabwean, born 1981). We Always Have Reason to Fear. 2008. Two lithographed posters, 23 15/16 × 16 15/16”. Image courtesy MoMA.
Read more: http://www.dwell.com/slideshows/impressions-from-south-africa.html?slide=17&c=y&paused=true#ixzz1GU5eV7Sa

    foreversavage:

    Kudzanai Chiurai. (Zimbabwean, born 1981). We Always Have Reason to Fear. 2008. Two lithographed posters, 23 15/16 × 16 15/16”. Image courtesy MoMA.


    Read more: http://www.dwell.com/slideshows/impressions-from-south-africa.html?slide=17&c=y&paused=true#ixzz1GU5eV7Sa

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  1. Nathaniel Frank, the author of Gays in Foreign Militaries 2010: A Global Primer, and today’s guest on Fresh Air: "Research has uniformly shown that transitions to  policies of equal treatment without regard to sexual orientation have  been highly successful and have had no negative impact on morale,  recruitment, retention, readiness or overall combat effectiveness." View in High-Res

    Nathaniel Frank, the author of Gays in Foreign Militaries 2010: A Global Primer, and today’s guest on Fresh Air: "Research has uniformly shown that transitions to policies of equal treatment without regard to sexual orientation have been highly successful and have had no negative impact on morale, recruitment, retention, readiness or overall combat effectiveness."

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