1. In the early 1960s when soul star Sam Cooke had his own record label, SAR, he recorded songs by his younger brother, L.C. Cooke. Ten of the tracks were supposed to become L.C.’s debut album in 1964. The release was postponed, then Sam Cooke was killed, SAR went out of business and L.C.’s album fell into limbo. Now, 50 years later, The Complete SAR Records Recordings has appeared. Fresh Air critic Milo Miles examines this lost piece of history:

I knew Sam Cooke had a younger brother who he had recorded and produced. But it was tough to hear any of L.C. Cooke’s rare singles and impossible to evaluate him as a performer overall. Not any more. All of the material L.C. recorded for his brother’s SAR label, plus two songs made before and one from after have come out as The Complete SAR Records Recordings. Most were written by Sam, a few by L.C. To get my one hesitation out of the way, L.C. is not quite the singer his brother was — tones less rich, phrasing a bit more pedestrian. But it’s good the material sketches a persona different than Sam’s. L. C. seems, how shall we say? — brattier.



L.C. Cooke via ABKCO records

    In the early 1960s when soul star Sam Cooke had his own record label, SAR, he recorded songs by his younger brother, L.C. Cooke. Ten of the tracks were supposed to become L.C.’s debut album in 1964. The release was postponed, then Sam Cooke was killed, SAR went out of business and L.C.’s album fell into limbo. Now, 50 years later, The Complete SAR Records Recordings has appeared. Fresh Air critic Milo Miles examines this lost piece of history:

    I knew Sam Cooke had a younger brother who he had recorded and produced. But it was tough to hear any of L.C. Cooke’s rare singles and impossible to evaluate him as a performer overall. Not any more. All of the material L.C. recorded for his brother’s SAR label, plus two songs made before and one from after have come out as The Complete SAR Records Recordings. Most were written by Sam, a few by L.C. To get my one hesitation out of the way, L.C. is not quite the singer his brother was — tones less rich, phrasing a bit more pedestrian. But it’s good the material sketches a persona different than Sam’s. L. C. seems, how shall we say? — brattier.

    L.C. Cooke via ABKCO records

  2. l.c. cooke

    sam cooke

    soul

    milo miles

    review

    ABKSCO records

  1. Today we’re playing a 2005 interview with The Godfather of Soul, James Brown, a 1990 interview with Bruce Tucker who collaborated with Brown on his autobiography, a 1989 interview with Maceo Parker, James Brown’s sax player, and bassist Bootsy Collins. You can listen to the interview here. 

Photo : James Brown in 1984 - by Lucian Perkins/ Washington Post View in High-Res

    Today we’re playing a 2005 interview with The Godfather of Soul, James Brown, a 1990 interview with Bruce Tucker who collaborated with Brown on his autobiography, a 1989 interview with Maceo Parker, James Brown’s sax player, and bassist Bootsy Collins. You can listen to the interview here. 

    Photo : James Brown in 1984 - by Lucian Perkins/ Washington Post

  2. james brown

    funk

    gospel

    soul

    interview

    fresh air

    terry gross

  1. americanroutes:

    Howard Tate’s rich, soulful cover of Bob Dylan’s “Girl from the North Country.”

    Learn more about Howard Tate, from his start as a teenage gospel singer to his late-career rise out of hard times and back to recording, on this week’s American Routes.

    Friday, we remember Howard Tate with excerpts from a 2003 interview. The Philadelphia soul singer died on Friday at the age of 72.

  2. howard tate

    music

    soul

    philadelphia

  1. Audio from the 1986 interview with Solomon Burke is now up.

  2. solomon burke

    soul

    terry gross

    1986

    fresh air