1. New York Times Supreme Court Correspondent Adam Liptak joins Fresh Air to talk about the recent ‘Hobby Lobby’ case, its larger implications, and some of the other major decisions the court handed down this term: 

"This is really a tale of two courts. If you focus on the decisions we’ve mostly talked about, they’ve mostly been quite divided and along predictable lines. If you step back and look at the whole landscape, about two-thirds of the decisions were unanimous. As we’ve discussed, some of that unanimity is fake because the rationales are so different—but not all of it. This really was a term in which the court came together in ways we haven’t seen in the nine years that [Justice] John Roberts has been in charge."
View in High-Res

    New York Times Supreme Court Correspondent Adam Liptak joins Fresh Air to talk about the recent ‘Hobby Lobby’ case, its larger implications, and some of the other major decisions the court handed down this term: 

    "This is really a tale of two courts. If you focus on the decisions we’ve mostly talked about, they’ve mostly been quite divided and along predictable lines. If you step back and look at the whole landscape, about two-thirds of the decisions were unanimous. As we’ve discussed, some of that unanimity is fake because the rationales are so different—but not all of it. This really was a term in which the court came together in ways we haven’t seen in the nine years that [Justice] John Roberts has been in charge."

  2. supreme court

    SCOTUS

    hobby lobby

    adam liptak

    interview

    fresh air

  1. The Supreme Court has voted to overturn a key section of Lyndon Johnson’s 1965 Voting Rights Act. That section involves a formula used to identify state and local governments with a history of racial discrimination. Those governments identified by the formula are required to submit prospective changes to voting law to a federal court or the Justice Department. Local governments can now make changes to their voting laws that need approval from higher ups. 
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote the dissent. Here’s our interview with legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin about Ginsburg.
And an interview with biographer Robert Caro about LBJ.
Above, Martin Luther King’s invitation to LBJ’s signing of the Voting Rights Act, 1965 via Michael Beschloss View in High-Res

    The Supreme Court has voted to overturn a key section of Lyndon Johnson’s 1965 Voting Rights Act. That section involves a formula used to identify state and local governments with a history of racial discrimination. Those governments identified by the formula are required to submit prospective changes to voting law to a federal court or the Justice Department. Local governments can now make changes to their voting laws that need approval from higher ups.

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote the dissent. Here’s our interview with legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin about Ginsburg.

    And an interview with biographer Robert Caro about LBJ.

    Above, Martin Luther King’s invitation to LBJ’s signing of the Voting Rights Act, 1965 via Michael Beschloss

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    SCOTUS

    Voting Rights Act of 1965

    LBJ

    MLK

    ruth bader ginsburg

    Jeffrey Toobin

  1. To know Justice O’Connor as I am privileged to do is to know that the word ‘regret’ never passes her lips. She is a forward-looking person. She is a Westerner. She is someone who is always thinking about the future, and it’s one of the absolutely great things about her. Did she regret her vote in Bush v. Gore? Did she regret the Bush presidency? You bet she did, and you bet she does. The war in Iraq. The war on terror. John Ashcroft as attorney general. The Terri Schiavo case. All of these things filled Justice O’Connor with revulsion, and you can be sure that her vote in Bush v. Gore weighs on her mind. Now, regret it? Saying she regretted it? Did she regret it? You bet.

    — Jeffrey Toobin talks to Terry Gross about how retired Justice Sandra Day O’Connor’s feels about her vote in Bush v. Gore

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Jeffrey Toobin

    Sandra Day O'Connor

    SCOTUS

    Bush v Gore

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg

  1. NPR Live Blog: Supreme Court Upholds Health Care Law 
(via Supreme Court Upholds Health Care Law : The Two-Way : NPR)

    NPR Live Blog: Supreme Court Upholds Health Care Law

    (via Supreme Court Upholds Health Care Law : The Two-Way : NPR)

  2. supreme court

    scotus

    aca

  1. Three months after historic arguments before the high court over the constitutionality of the administration’s sweeping health care law, we are about to find out if it will hold up. [full NPR coverage here]
(via Judging The Health Care Law : NPR)

    Three months after historic arguments before the high court over the constitutionality of the administration’s sweeping health care law, we are about to find out if it will hold up. [full NPR coverage here]

    (via Judging The Health Care Law : NPR)

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    npr

    supreme court

    scotus

  1. That’s the one tax deduction that judges have, if I can remember. If you buy new robes, that’s a business expense and can be deducted.

    — Justice Stevens on his robes. (Previously: Justice Breyer on Wait Wait, on his robes)

  2. supreme court

    scotus

    justice stevens

    justice breyer

  1. There’s been some change in my views about the death penalty, but I think there’s more of a change in the jurisprudence of the Court that made me eventually reach the conclusion that the death penalty, as it is presently administered, is unconstitutional.

    — Justice John Paul Stevens voted to uphold the death penalty in 1976. On today’s Fresh Air, he discusses his evolving viewpoints over his 35 years on the Supreme Court. 

  2. scotus

    john paul stevens

    supreme court

  1. The Court has held, I think incorrectly, that the First Amendment protects the right to use money just as though money were speech.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens talks about his dissenting opinion in the Citizens United ruling.

  2. john paul stevens

    scotus

    supreme court

  1. Justice Stephen Breyer, on how the Supreme Court has changed since he was appointed in 1994: “It’s gotten a little  harder for me in some respects. The first few years, I was pretty  nervous about whether I could do this job. Then you adjust to it. I  think over time, I worked pretty well with some of the members there and  I was quite often in the majority and then Justice White said that,  ‘with every new member, it’s a new court.’ And we’ve had quite a few new  members and the court’s changed and people learn to work with each  other again. I’m more in the dissent now. If you want a more precise  statement, that’s it.” (Photo: Steve Petteway) View in High-Res

    Justice Stephen Breyer, on how the Supreme Court has changed since he was appointed in 1994: “It’s gotten a little harder for me in some respects. The first few years, I was pretty nervous about whether I could do this job. Then you adjust to it. I think over time, I worked pretty well with some of the members there and I was quite often in the majority and then Justice White said that, ‘with every new member, it’s a new court.’ And we’ve had quite a few new members and the court’s changed and people learn to work with each other again. I’m more in the dissent now. If you want a more precise statement, that’s it.” (Photo: Steve Petteway)

  2. scotus

    supreme court

    stephen breyer

    fresh air

    terry gross

    npr