1. Calgary is a city built on this resource. Calgary is like a classic boom town; all of the skyscrapers in Calgary are named after the energy companies that are extracting the oil from the oil sands, or the banks that are funding them. There are construction cranes all over. And Canada … is defining itself as an energy superpower. I think it surprises a lot of people to hear they have the third-largest oil reserve in the world, behind Venezuela and Saudi Arabia.

    —  Reporter for the New Yorker Ryan Lizza speaks on Fresh Air about the Canadian oil industry and the Keystone Pipeline XL controversy

  2. fresh air

    interview

    ryan lizza

    the new yorker

    keystone pipeline

    obama

    oil

  1. Ryan Lizza joins Fresh Air to talk about Keystone Pipeline XL and how Obama is at a possible turning point for climate change mitigation:

Barack Obama gave a very important speech on his second term climate change priorities and at the very last moment he inserted some language into that speech about how he would settle this issue of the Keystone Pipeline and he said for him, he doesn’t want to see that pipeline approved if it would significantly contribute to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. So how the State Department settles that question is what everyone has their eye on. 




… I think there’s an important moment here, for Barack Obama if he chooses to take it — even if he thinks that denying the permit to build Keystone won’t have a huge impact on greenhouse gas emissions — he could use it as a symbolic turning point in the kind of energy future he wants America to have. That is, he might say, ‘At some point we have to move away from fossil fuels and I’m using this moment to lead a crusade in America to move away from fossil fuels.’



Hear the full interview, read more interview highlights, or read his article in the New Yorker here.

photo via globalpost View in High-Res

    Ryan Lizza joins Fresh Air to talk about Keystone Pipeline XL and how Obama is at a possible turning point for climate change mitigation:

    Barack Obama gave a very important speech on his second term climate change priorities and at the very last moment he inserted some language into that speech about how he would settle this issue of the Keystone Pipeline and he said for him, he doesn’t want to see that pipeline approved if it would significantly contribute to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. So how the State Department settles that question is what everyone has their eye on. 

    … I think there’s an important moment here, for Barack Obama if he chooses to take it — even if he thinks that denying the permit to build Keystone won’t have a huge impact on greenhouse gas emissions — he could use it as a symbolic turning point in the kind of energy future he wants America to have. That is, he might say, ‘At some point we have to move away from fossil fuels and I’m using this moment to lead a crusade in America to move away from fossil fuels.’

    Hear the full interview, read more interview highlights, or read his article in the New Yorker here.

    photo via globalpost

  2. fresh air

    interview

    ryan lizza

    keystone pipeline

    climate change

    obama

  1. New Yorker reporter Ryan Lizza joins Fresh Air to discuss “unconventional” oil resources and the Keystone Pipeline project in Northern Alberta Canada and its environmental and political ramifications:

As we sit here in October of 2013, immigration reform seems dead, gun control legislation is dead, and the government is shut down with no grand bargain in sight. So a lot of environmentalists say, “Why not concentrate on the things you can do unilaterally?” And one of those things you can do unilaterally is address climate change…


photo of oil spill via the New York Times View in High-Res

    New Yorker reporter Ryan Lizza joins Fresh Air to discuss “unconventional” oil resources and the Keystone Pipeline project in Northern Alberta Canada and its environmental and political ramifications:

    As we sit here in October of 2013, immigration reform seems dead, gun control legislation is dead, and the government is shut down with no grand bargain in sight. So a lot of environmentalists say, “Why not concentrate on the things you can do unilaterally?” And one of those things you can do unilaterally is address climate change

    photo of oil spill via the New York Times

  2. fresh air

    interview

    ryan lizza

    the new yorker

    keystone pipeline

    oil drilling

    environment

    climate change

    government shutdown

  1. 
It started back at a moment when some people thought Sarah Palin was still thinking about running for president. She wrote an op-ed where she endorsed Ryan’s policies and that put Republican candidates on notice that if you were going to compete for Republican votes in the 2012 primaries, you had to take a stand on Paul Ryan’s budgets.  So that pushed all the candidates into making that choice and Romney, under some pressure frankly, endorsed it.  And I think because there’s been a sort of vacuum in the Romney policy world, Paul Ryan has been very strategic about filling that vacuum.

— Ryan Lizza on how Paul Ryan has captured the GOP View in High-Res

    It started back at a moment when some people thought Sarah Palin was still thinking about running for president. She wrote an op-ed where she endorsed Ryan’s policies and that put Republican candidates on notice that if you were going to compete for Republican votes in the 2012 primaries, you had to take a stand on Paul Ryan’s budgets.  So that pushed all the candidates into making that choice and Romney, under some pressure frankly, endorsed it.  And I think because there’s been a sort of vacuum in the Romney policy world, Paul Ryan has been very strategic about filling that vacuum.

    Ryan Lizza on how Paul Ryan has captured the GOP

  2. Paul Ryan

    Ryan Lizza

    The New Yorker

  1. Audio for Terry’s interview with New Yorker writer Ryan Lizza about Michele Bachmann is now up. Enjoy!

  2. ryan lizza

    the new yorker

    Michele Bachmann

  1. For someone whose ideology is really defined by a strong dislike for government, if you look at the way she’s supported herself over the years, it’s mostly through the government. After law school, she works at the IRS, she’s there for four years, then in 1992 she starts taking in foster children and does that from 1992-1998 and is paid by the state to do that. She then works briefly for a local charter school and then she starts running for office and becomes first an employee of the state of Minnesota and then a congresswoman, an employee of the federal government. … Her husband is a psychologist [who] has two counseling clinics that like any other medical professional [clinic] takes lots of money from Medicare and Medicaid — and then on top of that, has received generous farm subsidies for a farm he owns in Wisconsin.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, New Yorker writer Ryan Lizza on Michele Bachmann.

  2. ryan lizza

    michele bachmann

    politics

    news

    new yorker

  1. For a number of years, Michele Bachmann’s personal website had a list of books she recommended people read. … I was looking over the list and noticed this biography of [Robert E.] Lee by [Steven] Wilkins. [I had] never heard of Wilkins and started looking at who he was. And frankly couldn’t believe that she was recommending this book. … It is an objectively pro-slavery book and one of the most startling things I learned about her in this piece.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, New Yorker writer Ryan Lizza talks about the books, writers and beliefs that have shaped Michele Bachmann.

  2. ryan lizza

    the new yorker

    michele bachmann

    politics

    news

  1. Tomorrow: Ryan Lizza on Michelle Bachmann [His New Yorker profile]

    Tomorrow: Ryan Lizza on Michelle Bachmann [His New Yorker profile]

  2. ryan lizza

    michelle bachmann

    politics

  1. Despite the funny phrasing, at the heart of the idea of leading from behind is the empowerment of other actors to do your bidding or, as in the case of Libya, to be used as cover for a policy that would be suspect in the eyes of other nations if it’s branded as a purely American operation

    — Ryan Lizza on the phrase ‘leading from behind' which has recently become a hot-button topic among political pundits after Lizza wrote in The New Yorker that an Obama advisor had used the term to describe Obama's actions in Libya. [Lizza on Fresh Air today]

  2. ryan lizza

    foreign policy

    the new yorker

    president obama

  1. New Yorker writer Ryan Lizza details President Obama’s response to the ongoing uprisings in the Middle East and explains why the president’s actions — in Egypt and then in Libya — say a great deal about the administration’s foreign policy strategy: ”The hinge of the story of his first term will be the uprising in the Middle East that will allow our foreign policy, to allow our interests and our values to align in a region where they have not been aligned for a very long time.” View in High-Res

    New Yorker writer Ryan Lizza details President Obama’s response to the ongoing uprisings in the Middle East and explains why the president’s actions — in Egypt and then in Libya — say a great deal about the administration’s foreign policy strategy: ”The hinge of the story of his first term will be the uprising in the Middle East that will allow our foreign policy, to allow our interests and our values to align in a region where they have not been aligned for a very long time.”

  2. president obama

    ryan lizza

    the new yorker

    foreign policy

  1. Posted on 27 April, 2011

    215 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from npr

    npr:

A Libyan opposition soldier raises the independence flag over a highrise building in Misurata after Gaddafi forces were defeated in the city center. Photo courtesy of Misurata Freedom Group.

Today: The New Yorker’s Ryan Lizza details how recent clashes in the Middle East have remade President Obama’s foreign policy.  View in High-Res

    npr:

    A Libyan opposition soldier raises the independence flag over a highrise building in Misurata after Gaddafi forces were defeated in the city center. Photo courtesy of Misurata Freedom Group.

    Today: The New Yorker’s Ryan Lizza details how recent clashes in the Middle East have remade President Obama’s foreign policy. 

  2. ryan lizza

    the new yorker

    foreign policy

    president obama

    libya

  1. Posted on 26 April, 2011

    19 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from statedept

    statedept:

    Secretaries Clinton, Kissinger film

    About the Author: Sarah Goldfarb serves as Associate Editor to DipNote.

    On April 17, Secretary Clinton returned from her visit to Berlin, Seoul, and Tokyo. Assistant Secretary Gordon said the NATO Ministerial in Berlin was “an opportunity to consult with key allies and partners not…

    Tomorrow: New Yorker writer Ryan Lizza analyzes Obama’s recent foreign policy decisions. Pictured above: State Department’s Tumblr. [Lizza’s article]

  2. state department

    foreign policy

    barack obama

    ryan lizza

    the new yorker

    libya