1. There’s nothing a certain type of record collector likes better than finding a stack of 78s on the Paramount label. Between 1917 and 1932, the label, which was one of several run by a furniture company in Grafton, Wisconsin, released thousands of records, but its real accomplishment was recording some of the greatest early blues and jazz performers. Jack White’s Third Man Records has joined with the reissue label Revenant to release the first of two packages documenting the label, with 800 songs from the label’s first ten years on a USB drive packed, with several books and packages of graphics, in a hand-made, velvet-upholstered oak box.  Ed Ward has the story today.

Photo by Dana (distortion) Yavin via Brooklyn Vegan

    There’s nothing a certain type of record collector likes better than finding a stack of 78s on the Paramount label. Between 1917 and 1932, the label, which was one of several run by a furniture company in Grafton, Wisconsin, released thousands of records, but its real accomplishment was recording some of the greatest early blues and jazz performers. Jack White’s Third Man Records has joined with the reissue label Revenant to release the first of two packages documenting the label, with 800 songs from the label’s first ten years on a USB drive packed, with several books and packages of graphics, in a hand-made, velvet-upholstered oak box.  Ed Ward has the story today.

    Photo by Dana (distortion) Yavin via Brooklyn Vegan

  2. paramount

    record label

    ed ward

    rock history

    fresh air

  1. Ed Ward, Fresh Air’s rock historian talks about the history of the Beach Boys and how they became a “nostalgia act.”

The Beach Boys took everyone by surprise. They didn’t fade away with the surf craze: Brian [Wilson] had his finger on the teenage pulse, and they also celebrated motorcycles, girls, cars, girls, school, and dancing. With girls. It was hard to go wrong, especially with the group’s vocals and Brian’s writing and arranging skills. Between 1962 and 1965, they charted 22 singles, nine of which hit the top ten and two of which topped the charts.

But then what happened?

via rocksucker View in High-Res

    Ed Ward, Fresh Air’s rock historian talks about the history of the Beach Boys and how they became a “nostalgia act.”

    The Beach Boys took everyone by surprise. They didn’t fade away with the surf craze: Brian [Wilson] had his finger on the teenage pulse, and they also celebrated motorcycles, girls, cars, girls, school, and dancing. With girls. It was hard to go wrong, especially with the group’s vocals and Brian’s writing and arranging skills. Between 1962 and 1965, they charted 22 singles, nine of which hit the top ten and two of which topped the charts.

    But then what happened?

    via rocksucker

  2. fresh air

    ed ward

    beach boys

    surfing

    rock history

  1. From our rock historian Ed Ward:

My piece on Huey P. Meaux left off just as he was discovering Doug Sahm, with whom he made a series of wonderful Sir Douglas Quintet albums. I’d give anything to hear what Huey (L) is telling Doug in this picture, taken at the Austin Music Awards some years back by my pal Martha Grenon. I actually did a piece on the later Sir Doug stuff, recorded in California and produced by members of the Quintet and Huey under the name Amigos de Musica, back in 2006. 
 


 Photo Copyright (c) Martha Grenon, used by permission

    From our rock historian Ed Ward:

    My piece on Huey P. Meaux left off just as he was discovering Doug Sahm, with whom he made a series of wonderful Sir Douglas Quintet albums. I’d give anything to hear what Huey (L) is telling Doug in this picture, taken at the Austin Music Awards some years back by my pal Martha Grenon. I actually did a piece on the later Sir Doug stuff, recorded in California and produced by members of the Quintet and Huey under the name Amigos de Musica, back in 2006.

     

     Photo Copyright (c) Martha Grenon, used by permission

  2. ed ward

    rock history

    huey meaux

    doug sahm

    amigos de musica

  1. Ed Ward, on Neil Diamond’s earliest days:

Probably the strongest negative reaction I’ve ever gotten to anything I’ve written was when I panned a Neil Diamond show during my stint at Austin’s daily newspaper. His fan club’s newsletter picked it up, and for two and a half years we got letters denouncing me — the last of which came from Vanuatu, in the South Pacific. But my disappointment in the show was based on remembering where Diamond had come from. Watching him literally wrap himself in an American flag, I remembered his contribution to pop music and felt sad.
View in High-Res

    Ed Ward, on Neil Diamond’s earliest days:

    Probably the strongest negative reaction I’ve ever gotten to anything I’ve written was when I panned a Neil Diamond show during my stint at Austin’s daily newspaper. His fan club’s newsletter picked it up, and for two and a half years we got letters denouncing me — the last of which came from Vanuatu, in the South Pacific. But my disappointment in the show was based on remembering where Diamond had come from. Watching him literally wrap himself in an American flag, I remembered his contribution to pop music and felt sad.

  2. neil diamond

    ed ward

    rock history

  1. Although Roy Orbison started out as a rockabilly performer on Sun Records, he didn’t really find his identity until he signed with a small Nashville label, Monument, in 1959. Rock historian Ed Ward looks at the 17 singles that put him, and the Monument label, on the map. View in High-Res

    Although Roy Orbison started out as a rockabilly performer on Sun Records, he didn’t really find his identity until he signed with a small Nashville label, Monument, in 1959. Rock historian Ed Ward looks at the 17 singles that put him, and the Monument label, on the map.

  2. ed ward

    rock history

    roy orbison

    monument records

  1. The Vagrants, one of New York City’s most popular bands in the 1960s, recorded only 30 minutes’ worth of music. Rock historian Ed Ward explains what happened to the band and why its music is worth hearing today View in High-Res

    The Vagrants, one of New York City’s most popular bands in the 1960s, recorded only 30 minutes’ worth of music. Rock historian Ed Ward explains what happened to the band and why its music is worth hearing today

  2. the vagrants

    ed ward

    music

    rock history