1. Radiolab from WNYC looks at the genetic and cultural reasons why Kenyans dominate in long-distance running. One of the guests on this episode is David Epstein. He spoke to Fresh Air in August about his study on the talent vs. skill of great athletes. But what if the skill and talent of Kenyan runners derives from a culturally-conditioned sense of perseverance? Radiolab explores:

Legions of athletes, sports gurus, and scientists have tried to figure out why Kenyans dominate long-distance running. In this short, we stumble across a surprising, and sort of terrifying, explanation.


image via run events View in High-Res

    Radiolab from WNYC looks at the genetic and cultural reasons why Kenyans dominate in long-distance running. One of the guests on this episode is David Epstein. He spoke to Fresh Air in August about his study on the talent vs. skill of great athletes. But what if the skill and talent of Kenyan runners derives from a culturally-conditioned sense of perseverance? Radiolab explores:

    Legions of athletes, sports gurus, and scientists have tried to figure out why Kenyans dominate long-distance running. In this short, we stumble across a surprising, and sort of terrifying, explanation.

    image via run events

  2. fresh air

    radiolab

    the sports gene

    david epstein

    sports

    running

    kenya

    culture

  1. So… cicadas. Get ready!


    Let’s document these bugs, people.

    (from the fine folks at RadioLab)

  2. Cicada Mania

    RadioLab

  1. Good morning! How about story to start today off right. From friends Lulu Miller at RadioLab and Darren Hoyt:




We found something else — a turtle, exhausted and barely able to stay afloat any longer, supporting a frog on its back while a spider clung to the frog’s head to avoid drowning. … Did the tortoise rock the heavy frog cargo from his back? No. Did the frog eat the spider? No. … Did the spider attack the frog out of fear, biting its slimy steed in desperation or in hopes of a meal? No, it did not. All anybody did was cling to each other.





Darren’s got the story of the picture and its first life here.
View in High-Res

    Good morning! How about story to start today off right. From friends Lulu Miller at RadioLab and Darren Hoyt:

    We found something else — a turtle, exhausted and barely able to stay afloat any longer, supporting a frog on its back while a spider clung to the frog’s head to avoid drowning. … Did the tortoise rock the heavy frog cargo from his back? No. Did the frog eat the spider? No. … Did the spider attack the frog out of fear, biting its slimy steed in desperation or in hopes of a meal? No, it did not. All anybody did was cling to each other.

    Darren’s got the story of the picture and its first life here.

  2. Good morning

    Lulu Miller

    Darren Hoyt

    RadioLab

  1. Posted on 6 July, 2012

    428 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from onthemedia

    The media is biased. Not in the way that people think it is, but it’s certainly biased towards tension, it’s biased towards surprise. And so, there might be some kind of bias that leads us all towards a result that is counterintuitive and exciting.

    — Radiolab host Jad Abumrad, who dropped by last week to talk about the Decline effect, which is when results from scientific experiments become less and less replicable over time. (via onthemedia)

  2. radiolab

  1. Radio Lab: The Turing Problem

  2. radiolab

    alan turing

  1. What’s different about Radiolab (and what I think is changing about the web) is that it *is* a production, just one of a very new kind. Radiolab is actually post-blog and post-livestream. It’s not aping the oratory of old or the raggedness of the new. It’s a hybrid that takes lessons from the past, recent and deep. That’s where I think web journalism is headed, too. “No one wants to read a 9,000-word treatise online,” reads a telling line from Sullivan piece. “On the Web, one-sentence links are as legitimate as thousand-word diatribes—in fact, they are often valued more.”

    — How ‘Radiolab’ Is Changing the Sound of the Radio - Alexis Madrigal - Technology - The Atlantic (via thisistheverge)

  2. radiolab

    the atlantic

  1. jasonandrewphotography:

    Last week, I had the pleasure of being asked to photograph Jad Abumrad, Radio host and Producer of RADIO LAB on WNYC in NYC. Jad was chosen as one of this years fellows of the John D. And Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation genius award. Below is a selection of some of my favorite images from the shoot.

    (All photos copyright John D. And Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

    j.a.d.

  2. Jad Abumrad

    radiolab

  1. Holy Genius, Abumrad Congrats to Jad Abumrad who just won a GENIUS GRANT.

    Holy Genius, Abumrad Congrats to Jad Abumrad who just won a GENIUS GRANT.

  2. radiolab

    jad abumrad

    macarthur genius grant

  1. iamcharlotteaddams:

In honor of National Radio Day: the list of my top 10 Public Radio Programs that was in my short-lived (read: two issue) high school zine. Still pretty accurate. (Note: ranking is basically random past #3)
Wait! Wait! Don’t Tell Me (DUH)
This American Life (close second)
A Prairie Home Companion (Garrison Keillor, you complete me)
Says You!
[American] Radio Works
Studio 360
Selected Shorts
Fresh Air
Anything Jay Allison does (kind of a cop out, but the man is a public radio producin’ genius and hotwired into my soul)
City Arts and Lectures
Also Radiolab (don’t know how that got left off the original list. Oops), and let’s just go ahead and say every single program on KQED’s schedule.
Public radio is the business, y’all.

I totally forgot about National Radio Day. (It was Saturday.) We are honored to be #8 on your list. (Very nice penmanship.)  View in High-Res

    iamcharlotteaddams:

    In honor of National Radio Day: the list of my top 10 Public Radio Programs that was in my short-lived (read: two issue) high school zine. Still pretty accurate. (Note: ranking is basically random past #3)

    1. Wait! Wait! Don’t Tell Me (DUH)
    2. This American Life (close second)
    3. A Prairie Home Companion (Garrison Keillor, you complete me)
    4. Says You!
    5. [American] Radio Works
    6. Studio 360
    7. Selected Shorts
    8. Fresh Air
    9. Anything Jay Allison does (kind of a cop out, but the man is a public radio producin’ genius and hotwired into my soul)
    10. City Arts and Lectures

    Also Radiolab (don’t know how that got left off the original list. Oops), and let’s just go ahead and say every single program on KQED’s schedule.

    Public radio is the business, y’all.

    I totally forgot about National Radio Day. (It was Saturday.) We are honored to be #8 on your list. (Very nice penmanship.) 

  2. national radio day

    public radio

    wait wait don't tell me

    wait wait

    this american life

    prairie home companion

    says you

    american radio works

    Studio 360

    selected shorts

    fresh air

    jay allison

    this i believe

    city arts & lectures

    radiolab

    kqed

    npr

    pri

    apm

  1. Someone on Twitter said that today’s show reminded him of the Lucy episode of Radiolab. Which is quite good. Enjoy.

  2. radiolab

    wnyc

    lucy

    chimpanzee

  1. newzed:

The Obsessive Pleasures of ‘Radiolab’

    newzed:

    The Obsessive Pleasures of ‘Radiolab

  2. radiolab

    new york times magazine

  1. Public Media Peabody Recipients 2011

    Almost every link goes to the full performance. Enjoy!

    Radiolab (their tumblr)

    Great Performances: Macbeth (PBS)

    Sherlock: A Study in Pink (David Bianculli review)

    Lucia’s Letter (WGCU)

    LennonNYC (Cynthia Lennon on Fresh Air)

    Trafficked: A Youth Radio Investigation

    Independent Lens: Reel Injun: On the Trail of the Hollywood Indians

    The Promised Land (APM)

    Covering Pakistan: War, Flood and Social Issues (NPR)

    Seeking Justice for Campus Rape (NPR)

    My Lai (PBS)

    The Moth Radio Hour (PRX)

    Behind the Bail Bond System (NPR)

    Elia Kazan: A Letter to Elia (PBS) 

    William Kentridge: Anything is Possible (PBS)

    POV: The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers (Bud Krogh on Fresh Air)

    The Wounded Patrol (PBS)

    Zimbabwe’s Forgotten Children (BBC4)

    Wonders of the Solar System (BBC Science Channel)

  2. peabody awards

    pbs

    npr

    apm

    radiolab

    the moth

    public media

    pri

  1. Jad: It’ll dill your pickle, is what it’ll do. Brenna: Dill your pickle? Is the FCC going to come after us? Jad: It’s not dirty, is it? Brenna: I don’t know, I’ve never heard it before. Jad: Huh. I guess it’s a Southern thing.

    — 

    Radiolab: While recording a promo for our live show… RADIOLAB IS ON TUMBLR

     

  2. radiolab

    wnyc

    jad and robert

    nerdcrush

  1. stickshiftlife:

    “This has convinced me to turn off the radio and just listen to the world today.”

  2. radiolab

  1. Any suggestions?

    One of our Twitter followers (@courtneybolton) asked if we had a favorite episodes list on our website, like the way This American Life has a favorite episodes list on their website or the way that RadioLab tags their episodes with categories like gut-wrenching or knee-slapping.

    The answer is no, we don’t.

    But that seems like a good idea and a good way to help people sifting through the 20+ year archive. So if you have a favorite, please let us know and we’ll start to get a (categorized?) list together….

  2. favorite episodes list

    this american life

    radiolab

    fresh air