1. Linguist Geoff Nunberg reflects on the changing meaning of the proverb “a few bad apples,” which he says is “the reflexive defense whenever misconduct surfaces in the midst of some  organization, from Enron to Abu Ghraib to Haditha to the mortgage  meltdown. It’s an ancient bit of counsel, whether it’s said of bad  apples or rotten ones, or of bushels, barrels, baskets or bins. Benjamin  Franklin had it as “the rotten apple spoils his companion,” which goes  back to Shakespeare’s time.” View in High-Res

    Linguist Geoff Nunberg reflects on the changing meaning of the proverb “a few bad apples,” which he says is “the reflexive defense whenever misconduct surfaces in the midst of some organization, from Enron to Abu Ghraib to Haditha to the mortgage meltdown. It’s an ancient bit of counsel, whether it’s said of bad apples or rotten ones, or of bushels, barrels, baskets or bins. Benjamin Franklin had it as “the rotten apple spoils his companion,” which goes back to Shakespeare’s time.”

  2. language

    geoff nunberg

    one bad apple

    proverb