1. Joel McHale of The Soup and Community tells Fresh Air about hosting the White House Correspondents’ Dinner in May and how he was adamant not to let anyone see his material beforehand:

"Everyone wants to see your jokes. CSPAN wants to see your jokes so they know who to go to with their cameras. The president’s people would like to see your jokes because they want to know what you’re going to talk about. I didn’t want anybody to see my jokes because I feel like if CSPAN knew who I was going to make fun of then the camera would be on them before I was finished with the joke. I think it’s a good policy not to show anybody your jokes…They weren’t going to censor me at all… They literally put no restrictions on what I was going to say. I could’ve said anything I wanted. In some countries, if [you] were to say the things I said, you would be thrown into jail.” 


McHale stars in the new cop thriller Deliver Us From Evil. 
Photo via Getty View in High-Res

    Joel McHale of The Soup and Community tells Fresh Air about hosting the White House Correspondents’ Dinner in May and how he was adamant not to let anyone see his material beforehand:

    "Everyone wants to see your jokes. CSPAN wants to see your jokes so they know who to go to with their cameras. The president’s people would like to see your jokes because they want to know what you’re going to talk about. I didn’t want anybody to see my jokes because I feel like if CSPAN knew who I was going to make fun of then the camera would be on them before I was finished with the joke.
     
    I think it’s a good policy not to show anybody your jokes…They weren’t going to censor me at all… They literally put no restrictions on what I was going to say. I could’ve said anything I wanted. In some countries, if [you] were to say the things I said, you would be thrown into jail.”
     

    McHale stars in the new cop thriller Deliver Us From Evil

    Photo via Getty

  2. joel mchale

    fresh air

    interview

    the soup

    community

    white house correspondents' dinner

    president obama

    satire

    comedy

  1. For Poetry Month we’re revisiting our interview with poet Richard Blanco, who read a poem at President Obama’s second swearing-in.  He is the first immigrant, Latino and openly gay poet chosen to read at a presidential inauguration and, at 44, also the youngest. He is the author of the collection Looking for the Gulf Motel, which explores themes of sexuality and home.  
In the interview he compares being an engineer—as he is—to being a poet: 

"As an engineer … in your designs and whatnot, you’re trained to figure out what’s going to go wrong. That’s how you design a lot of things. You’re like, ‘OK, that’s a decently designed curve there in the road, but what could go wrong? What’s wrong with this design?’ And you’re constantly putting things up to the test and up to the test, and overdesigning and implementing things and safety factors, and if I wasn’t like that already, 25 years of engineering have pretty much reinforced that."


View in High-Res

    For Poetry Month we’re revisiting our interview with poet Richard Blanco, who read a poem at President Obama’s second swearing-in.  He is the first immigrant, Latino and openly gay poet chosen to read at a presidential inauguration and, at 44, also the youngest. He is the author of the collection Looking for the Gulf Motel, which explores themes of sexuality and home.  

    In the interview he compares being an engineer—as he is—to being a poet: 

    "As an engineer … in your designs and whatnot, you’re trained to figure out what’s going to go wrong. That’s how you design a lot of things. You’re like, ‘OK, that’s a decently designed curve there in the road, but what could go wrong? What’s wrong with this design?’ And you’re constantly putting things up to the test and up to the test, and overdesigning and implementing things and safety factors, and if I wasn’t like that already, 25 years of engineering have pretty much reinforced that."

  2. poetry

    richard blanco

    inauguration

    president obama

    interview

    fresh air

  1. Questlove talks to Terry Gross about his nonchalance:

    I learned long ago to curb my enthusiasm. This is the one character trait in me that people closest to me absolutely abhor: The fact that I’m very nonchalant about everything. I say everything with the most casualness of, you know, ‘It’s no big deal.’ I’m not saying that it wasn’t a big deal, it’s just I’ve come to the realization that every day my life has this sort of Forrest Gump experience. Every day is an ‘I was there’ moment. So it just becomes a little redundant to get excited about every day when every day is sort of like a high.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Questlove

    Mo' Meta Blues

    President Obama

    The Roots

    Late Night With Jimmy Fallon

  1. Journalist and author of The Center Holds, Jonathan Alter, tells Dave Davies about 'the cave' at the Obama campaign headquarters:

They had a secret annex off of the main floor of the Chicago headquarters that they called ‘the cave.’ They had a group of analytics experts, most of them in their 20s. [And] not just data scientists, but they had a child prodigy, they had a biophysicist, they had three professional poker players that had all been hired on the basis of extremely difficult online exams where they solved various analytical problems. And then they took their models and their algorithms and they applied them to the workaday problems of the Obama campaign in field organizing and fundraising.

Image via The Daily Beast

    Journalist and author of The Center Holds, Jonathan Alter, tells Dave Davies about 'the cave' at the Obama campaign headquarters:

    They had a secret annex off of the main floor of the Chicago headquarters that they called ‘the cave.’ They had a group of analytics experts, most of them in their 20s. [And] not just data scientists, but they had a child prodigy, they had a biophysicist, they had three professional poker players that had all been hired on the basis of extremely difficult online exams where they solved various analytical problems. And then they took their models and their algorithms and they applied them to the workaday problems of the Obama campaign in field organizing and fundraising.

    Image via The Daily Beast

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Jonathan Alter

    The Center Holds

    President Obama

    2012 presidential campaign

  1. New York Times reporter Scott Shane tells Terry Gross about the Obama administration’s justification of the President’s personal approval of the names on the kill list:

I don’t think it’s that [President Obama is] blood thirsty and really enjoys trying to put people’s names on lists to be killed. I think there’s a certain wariness — probably a proper wariness — that any president would have towards agencies. Agencies kind of want to do what they’re good at doing, or what they’re job is. So certainly, according to what we’ve heard, both the CIA and … the element of the military that does these strikes, are pretty aggressive. They want to find targets and kill them, and so I think the role of the White House …. was really one of restraining the agencies, double-checking the agencies, making sure that — at this sort of broader strategic, political level — there was good judgment being exercised…

Image by photoranger54 via Flickr

    New York Times reporter Scott Shane tells Terry Gross about the Obama administration’s justification of the President’s personal approval of the names on the kill list:

    I don’t think it’s that [President Obama is] blood thirsty and really enjoys trying to put people’s names on lists to be killed. I think there’s a certain wariness — probably a proper wariness — that any president would have towards agencies. Agencies kind of want to do what they’re good at doing, or what they’re job is. So certainly, according to what we’ve heard, both the CIA and … the element of the military that does these strikes, are pretty aggressive. They want to find targets and kill them, and so I think the role of the White House …. was really one of restraining the agencies, double-checking the agencies, making sure that — at this sort of broader strategic, political level — there was good judgment being exercised…

    Image by photoranger54 via Flickr

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Scott Shane

    Drones

    National Security

    President Obama

    The New York Times

  1. I have to tell you that over the course of several years as I have talked to friends and family and neighbors when I think about members of my own staff who are in incredibly committed monogamous relationships, same-sex relationships, who are raising kids together, when I think about those soldiers or airmen or marines or sailors who are out there fighting on my behalf and yet feel constrained, even now that Don’t Ask Don’t Tell is gone, because they are not able to commit themselves in a marriage, at a certain point I’ve just concluded that for me personally it is important for me to go ahead and affirm that I think same sex couples should be able to get married.

    — Barack Obama in an interview with ABC News

  2. president obama

    same-sex marriage

  1. If you look at [President Obama’s] strategy for 2012, he’s basically been really honest about the fact that he’s going to be attacking the Republican Congress right and left. This era of Barack Obama trying to be this bipartisan uniter seems to be over, at least for now.

    — Jodi Kantor on the 2012 Democratic Strategy.

  2. politics

    president obama

    2012

    barack obama

  1. On today’s Fresh Air, Michelle and Barack Obama: A Powerful Partnership



www.Army.mil (by The U.S. Army)

    On today’s Fresh Air, Michelle and Barack Obama: A Powerful Partnership

    www.Army.mil (by The U.S. Army)

  2. michelle obama

    barack obama

    president obama

    jodi kantor

    the white house

  1. clarajudgypants:

Michelle Obama in 2009 at the Congressional Black Caucus dinner in Washington. Photo credit: Damon Winter/The New York Times

Tomorrow: Jodi Kantor on The Obamas

    clarajudgypants:

    Michelle Obama in 2009 at the Congressional Black Caucus dinner in Washington. Photo credit: Damon Winter/The New York Times

    Tomorrow: Jodi Kantor on The Obamas

  2. jodi kantor

    president obama

    michelle obama

    the obamas

  1. Wall Street helped him as a candidate, but he needed to turn on his heel once it was clear he was going to win the presidency and say, ‘Thank you guys, but I need people who will give Wall Street medicine and give Wall Street very Rooseveltian medicine.’ He didn’t do that. Instead he brought in Tim [Geithner] and Larry [Summers], who are not Wall Street guys but who are affectionate and attentive toward Wall Street. That was a key moment where the president lost his way.

    — 

    Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ron Suskind paints an unflattering picture of rivalries and dysfunction within President Obama’s first economic team in his book Confidence Men: Wall Street, Washington, and the Education of a President.

  2. ron suskind

    confidence men

    president obama

    economy

  1. Despite the funny phrasing, at the heart of the idea of leading from behind is the empowerment of other actors to do your bidding or, as in the case of Libya, to be used as cover for a policy that would be suspect in the eyes of other nations if it’s branded as a purely American operation

    — Ryan Lizza on the phrase ‘leading from behind' which has recently become a hot-button topic among political pundits after Lizza wrote in The New Yorker that an Obama advisor had used the term to describe Obama's actions in Libya. [Lizza on Fresh Air today]

  2. ryan lizza

    foreign policy

    the new yorker

    president obama

  1. New Yorker writer Ryan Lizza details President Obama’s response to the ongoing uprisings in the Middle East and explains why the president’s actions — in Egypt and then in Libya — say a great deal about the administration’s foreign policy strategy: ”The hinge of the story of his first term will be the uprising in the Middle East that will allow our foreign policy, to allow our interests and our values to align in a region where they have not been aligned for a very long time.” View in High-Res

    New Yorker writer Ryan Lizza details President Obama’s response to the ongoing uprisings in the Middle East and explains why the president’s actions — in Egypt and then in Libya — say a great deal about the administration’s foreign policy strategy: ”The hinge of the story of his first term will be the uprising in the Middle East that will allow our foreign policy, to allow our interests and our values to align in a region where they have not been aligned for a very long time.”

  2. president obama

    ryan lizza

    the new yorker

    foreign policy

  1. Posted on 27 April, 2011

    215 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from npr

    npr:

A Libyan opposition soldier raises the independence flag over a highrise building in Misurata after Gaddafi forces were defeated in the city center. Photo courtesy of Misurata Freedom Group.

Today: The New Yorker’s Ryan Lizza details how recent clashes in the Middle East have remade President Obama’s foreign policy. 

    npr:

    A Libyan opposition soldier raises the independence flag over a highrise building in Misurata after Gaddafi forces were defeated in the city center. Photo courtesy of Misurata Freedom Group.

    Today: The New Yorker’s Ryan Lizza details how recent clashes in the Middle East have remade President Obama’s foreign policy. 

  2. ryan lizza

    the new yorker

    foreign policy

    president obama

    libya