1. Today’s Fresh Air, Susan Freinkel on chemicals in plastics: “These chemicals act in a more convoluted and complicated way.  ”They interfere with our hormones and they interfere with the endocrine system, which is the network of glands that orchestrate growth and development. And there’s some research showing that DEHP, this chemical that’s in vinyl [used in IV bags] has this property. It interferes with testosterone.” [complete interview here] View in High-Res

    Today’s Fresh Air, Susan Freinkel on chemicals in plastics: “These chemicals act in a more convoluted and complicated way.  ”They interfere with our hormones and they interfere with the endocrine system, which is the network of glands that orchestrate growth and development. And there’s some research showing that DEHP, this chemical that’s in vinyl [used in IV bags] has this property. It interferes with testosterone.” [complete interview here]

  2. environment

    science

    plastic

    susan freinkel

    plastic: a toxic love story

    hormones

  1. While looking up images of ‘plastic’ for tomorrow’s show, I discovered this. Can someone explain what’s going on here?
Plastic sneeuwstormbeschermer / Face protection from snowstorms (by Nationaal Archief)

    While looking up images of ‘plastic’ for tomorrow’s show, I discovered this. Can someone explain what’s going on here?

    Plastic sneeuwstormbeschermer / Face protection from snowstorms (by Nationaal Archief)

  2. photography

    plastic

    why did this never catch on?

  1. Posted on 18 April, 2011

    3,062 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from neaq

    neaq:


At first I thought it was a jelly fish, then, as I swam closer, I realized it was a plastic bag. – Expedition leader Greg Stone

Even remote coral reefs in Indonesia aren’t immune to the blight of plastics. Get the big picture on the Global Explorers Blog.

Like American Beauty, but underwater. In Indonesia. 

    neaq:

    At first I thought it was a jelly fish, then, as I swam closer, I realized it was a plastic bag. – Expedition leader Greg Stone

    Even remote coral reefs in Indonesia aren’t immune to the blight of plastics. Get the big picture on the Global Explorers Blog.

    Like American Beauty, but underwater. In Indonesia. 

  2. plastic

  1. When plastics came bursting on the scene, “the presumption was that these were inert materials. And what we’re finding is that they may actually be much more biologically active than we ever imagined.” — Our guest tomorrow, Susan Freinkel, author of Plastic: A Toxic Love Story. She says plastics leech potentially harmful chemicals that we don’t know enough about. 

  2. susan freinkel

    plastic: a toxic love story

    plastic

    bpa

  1. Donovan Hohn talks about ‘garbage patches' in the ocean: "When I first heard the phrase ‘garbage patch,’ I imagined something dense. I initially imagined it as a floating junkyard, and you’d have to poke your way through it with a paddle if you’re in a kayak. But it’s not like that. You can’t take a picture of it because that doesn’t exist. What does exist is a whole lot of plastic out there, but it’s spread out over millions of miles of ocean. And some of it floats on the surface where you can find it. And some of it floats just below the surface. And eventually all of it will photodegrade, so much of it is so small you’re not going to be able to see it with the naked eye."
Photo: NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration

    Donovan Hohn talks about ‘garbage patches' in the ocean: "When I first heard the phrase ‘garbage patch,’ I imagined something dense. I initially imagined it as a floating junkyard, and you’d have to poke your way through it with a paddle if you’re in a kayak. But it’s not like that. You can’t take a picture of it because that doesn’t exist. What does exist is a whole lot of plastic out there, but it’s spread out over millions of miles of ocean. And some of it floats on the surface where you can find it. And some of it floats just below the surface. And eventually all of it will photodegrade, so much of it is so small you’re not going to be able to see it with the naked eye."

    Photo: NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration

  2. donovan hohn

    garbage patches

    ocean

    environment

    plastic

    moby-duck

  1. Trash Items Found Most Frequently In The Ocean

      1) cigarette butts
      2) paper pieces
      3) plastic pieces
      4) styrofoam
      5) glass pieces
      6) plastic food bags
      7) plastic caps and lids
      8) metal beverage cans
      9) plastic straws
      10) glass beverage bottles
      11) plastic beverage bottles
      12) styrofoam cups
    Plastics in our Oceans

    (Source: marcons.env.duke.edu)

  2. plastic

    ocean