1. David Suchet has been playing Belgian detective Hercule Poirot since 1989. After a 13-season run, Poirot, the mystery series based on Agatha Christie’s novels, has come to an end. The series is now on Acorn TV, streaming online. David Bianculli reflects on the long-running show:

But since these are, absolutely, the last TV episodes featuring Suchet as Poirot, they do provide a satisfying conclusion to a very long-running viewing experience. The actor has grown into the role, sporting wrinkles to match the wisdom, and perfecting the twinkle in his eye whenever, as the detective himself would put it, Poirot has finally solved the case as only Poirot can. And think of it: The actors of the current movie Boyhood have gotten lots of praise for filming and playing their roles over a 12-year period. David Suchet, as Hercule Poirot, has done the same thing for twice as long.
He’s done it so long, in fact, that he’s ending his run on a medium that didn’t even exist when he started. Wrap your little grey cells around that…
View in High-Res

    David Suchet has been playing Belgian detective Hercule Poirot since 1989. After a 13-season run, Poirot, the mystery series based on Agatha Christie’s novels, has come to an end. The series is now on Acorn TV, streaming online. David Bianculli reflects on the long-running show:

    But since these are, absolutely, the last TV episodes featuring Suchet as Poirot, they do provide a satisfying conclusion to a very long-running viewing experience. The actor has grown into the role, sporting wrinkles to match the wisdom, and perfecting the twinkle in his eye whenever, as the detective himself would put it, Poirot has finally solved the case as only Poirot can. And think of it: The actors of the current movie Boyhood have gotten lots of praise for filming and playing their roles over a 12-year period. David Suchet, as Hercule Poirot, has done the same thing for twice as long.

    He’s done it so long, in fact, that he’s ending his run on a medium that didn’t even exist when he started. Wrap your little grey cells around that…

  2. poirot

    mystery

    agatha christie

    PBS

    acorn TV

    david bianculli

  1. This summer marks the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer, a movement to open the polls to blacks in Mississippi and end the state’s white supremacy. 
Freedom Summer was organized by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), which recruited 700 college students—mostly white students from the North—to come down to Mississippi to help African Americans register to vote. 
A new documentary called Freedom Summer airs on PBS tomorrow. The film’s director Stanley Nelson, and longtime journalist and one of Freedom Summer’s organizers Charles Cobb joined Fresh Air to discuss the movement. Cobb explains how SNCC trained the students for their entry into the violent South: 

Charles Cobb: We could show people how best to try and protect yourself from actual physical [harm] – what to do if you’re attacked by a mob, how to cover your body, how to protect somebody who you’re with without engaging in fistfights or whipping out a pistol… We could show people how to do that. We had some experience in that because we all came out of the sit-in movement and were used to being surrounded by mobs of hostile whites.

    This summer marks the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer, a movement to open the polls to blacks in Mississippi and end the state’s white supremacy. 

    Freedom Summer was organized by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), which recruited 700 college students—mostly white students from the North—to come down to Mississippi to help African Americans register to vote. 

    A new documentary called Freedom Summer airs on PBS tomorrow. The film’s director Stanley Nelson, and longtime journalist and one of Freedom Summer’s organizers Charles Cobb joined Fresh Air to discuss the movement. Cobb explains how SNCC trained the students for their entry into the violent South: 

    Charles Cobb: We could show people how best to try and protect yourself from actual physical [harm] – what to do if you’re attacked by a mob, how to cover your body, how to protect somebody who you’re with without engaging in fistfights or whipping out a pistol… We could show people how to do that. We had some experience in that because we all came out of the sit-in movement and were used to being surrounded by mobs of hostile whites.

  2. civil rights

    documentary

    PBS

    freedom summer

    voting

    racism

    mississippi

    history

  1. Jon Hamm explains emotions on Sesame Street. 

    (You’re welcome)

    Happy Hump Day, people! 

  2. jon hamm

    sesame street

    mad men

    pbs

    emotions

    wednesday

  1. Posted on 7 November, 2013

    230 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from gggfunny

    Tomorrow: Stephen Colbert talks about doing his show, The Colbert Report, in character:

And so I look at every guest as a guest — they’re a guest in my home, and I am grateful that they would come here. And I hope people have a good time, and if they don’t, it’s my fault, or rather, it’s my responsibility. Because if I actually get into an aggressive discussion with a guest about something … and I’m expressing my disagreement satirically, and if they don’t enjoy that, that’s OK, because I have a responsibility for what I’m saying.


Colbert also stars in the Stephen Sondheim musical Company, airing 11/8 on the PBS “Great Performances” series. View in High-Res

    Tomorrow: Stephen Colbert talks about doing his show, The Colbert Report, in character:

    And so I look at every guest as a guest — they’re a guest in my home, and I am grateful that they would come here. And I hope people have a good time, and if they don’t, it’s my fault, or rather, it’s my responsibility. Because if I actually get into an aggressive discussion with a guest about something … and I’m expressing my disagreement satirically, and if they don’t enjoy that, that’s OK, because I have a responsibility for what I’m saying.

    Colbert also stars in the Stephen Sondheim musical Company, airing 11/8 on the PBS “Great Performances” series.

  2. fresh air

    interview

    stephen colbert

    the colbert report

    stephen sondheim

    pbs

  1. World tennis champion and gender equality advocate Billie Jean King is on the show tomorrow.

    In the 1973 “Battle of the Sexes" match vs. Bobby Riggs she "changed consciousness" in her victory for women everywhere.

    She is also the founder of the Women’s Tennis Association.

    American Masters profiles King for her achievements in sport and her major contributions to gender equality.

  2. fresh air

    interview

    billie jean king

    tennis

    bobby riggs

    battle of the sexes

    american masters

    pbs

  1. Memory is a fickle and funny thing, isn’t it?
The New York Times published an article today on a study at M.I.T on false, or mistaken memories and where they come from.
Essentially, they shocked mice in one location and caused them to falsely remember the event occurring in a different location. The scientists could actually see the cells in their brains indicating a memory being formed in the location where they had not been shocked. When the mice were re-introduced to that first location (where they had not been shocked), they exhibited fear. 
From the article:

'Because the mechanisms of memory formation are almost certainly similar in mice and humans, part of the importance of the research is “to make people realize even more than before how unreliable human memory is.”' 

It also poses the question of why our brains would allow us to create false memories.

Here is a Fresh Air interview with scientist Suzanne Corkin on her work in short term memory and her book, Permanent Present Tense. Corkin worked with a patient (H.M.) who was unable to form new memories.

image via PBS

    Memory is a fickle and funny thing, isn’t it?

    The New York Times published an article today on a study at M.I.T on false, or mistaken memories and where they come from.

    Essentially, they shocked mice in one location and caused them to falsely remember the event occurring in a different location. The scientists could actually see the cells in their brains indicating a memory being formed in the location where they had not been shocked. When the mice were re-introduced to that first location (where they had not been shocked), they exhibited fear. 

    From the article:

    'Because the mechanisms of memory formation are almost certainly similar in mice and humans, part of the importance of the research is “to make people realize even more than before how unreliable human memory is.”' 


    It also poses the question of why our brains would allow us to create false memories.

    Here is a Fresh Air interview with scientist Suzanne Corkin on her work in short term memory and her book, Permanent Present Tense. Corkin worked with a patient (H.M.) who was unable to form new memories.

    image via PBS

  2. fresh air

    interview

    suzanne corkin

    permanent present tense

    new york times

    memory loss

    false memory

    science

    pbs

  1. In case you missed it, here is David Bianculli's review of 'The Central Park 5':

The case, by now, is anything but a whodunit; the actual rapist and attacker eventually stepped forward and confessed, and DNA samples from the crime scene proved a perfect match. But that didn’t happen until five teenage boys had been convicted of the crime and spent seven years in prison. They claim to have been coerced into giving false confessions, and the documentary makes a compelling case on their behalf.

You can watch the documentary online here. View in High-Res

    In case you missed it, here is David Bianculli's review of 'The Central Park 5':

    The case, by now, is anything but a whodunit; the actual rapist and attacker eventually stepped forward and confessed, and DNA samples from the crime scene proved a perfect match. But that didn’t happen until five teenage boys had been convicted of the crime and spent seven years in prison. They claim to have been coerced into giving false confessions, and the documentary makes a compelling case on their behalf.

    You can watch the documentary online here.

  2. Fresh Air

    Reviews

    The Central Park Five

    David Bianculli

    PBS

    Ken Burns

    Emily Nussbaum

  1. John Powers on the PBS documentary Philip Roth: Unmasked that premieres next week:

Here’s a writer who specializes in anger, sarcasm, iconoclasm, dirtiness, atheism, comedy and sexual attitudes that smack of misogyny.
While Philip Roth Unmasked doesn’t completely ignore his dark ferocity, it tiptoes around it. We learn little about his personal life, which was messy enough to prompt his ex-wife, actress Claire Bloom, to spend 150 pages of a book excoriating his manipulative narcissism. Nor do we get much insight into what’s obvious from Roth’s work — his ambition, his princely sense of entitlement, his use of fury as fuel, his tendency toward political sanctimony, his way of seeing women as one big perk of fame.


Image courtesy of PBS View in High-Res

    John Powers on the PBS documentary Philip Roth: Unmasked that premieres next week:

    Here’s a writer who specializes in anger, sarcasm, iconoclasm, dirtiness, atheism, comedy and sexual attitudes that smack of misogyny.

    While Philip Roth Unmasked doesn’t completely ignore his dark ferocity, it tiptoes around it. We learn little about his personal life, which was messy enough to prompt his ex-wife, actress Claire Bloom, to spend 150 pages of a book excoriating his manipulative narcissism. Nor do we get much insight into what’s obvious from Roth’s work — his ambition, his princely sense of entitlement, his use of fury as fuel, his tendency toward political sanctimony, his way of seeing women as one big perk of fame.

    Image courtesy of PBS

  2. Fresh Air

    Reviews

    PBS

    John Powers

    Philip Roth Unmasked

    Books

  1. Just thought we’d let you know that, starting tonight, our mothership, WHYY, is airing a series on the "Pioneers of Television." First episode up: Funny Ladies. It’ll feature Mindy Kaling, Cloris Leachman, Tina Fey, Joan Rivers, Susie Essman, Amy Sedaris, Sarah Silverman, Bea Arthur, Phyllis Diller and Betty White. Oh yes. Good stuff.

  2. WHYY

    Funny Ladies

    PBS

    Pioneers of Television

    Mindy Kaling

  1. David Bianculli on Magical Mystery Tour and a new PBS documentary about its making:




It was written and produced in 1967, which was an incredibly fertile period for the Beatles. “Strawberry Fields Forever” came out that year, and “Penny Lane,” and the Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album. Which was followed, a month later, by the live TV premiere of “All You Need Is Love,” broadcast globally. The Beatles, it seemed, could do no wrong. And then they did Magical Mystery Tour, which was televised by the BBC the day after Christmas — on Boxing Day — as a holiday special. A quarter of the British population watched it — and many of those hated it.





Listen to the Fresh Air interview with Paul McCartney.
View in High-Res

    David Bianculli on Magical Mystery Tour and a new PBS documentary about its making:

    It was written and produced in 1967, which was an incredibly fertile period for the Beatles. “Strawberry Fields Forever” came out that year, and “Penny Lane,” and the Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album. Which was followed, a month later, by the live TV premiere of “All You Need Is Love,” broadcast globally. The Beatles, it seemed, could do no wrong. And then they did Magical Mystery Tour, which was televised by the BBC the day after Christmas — on Boxing Day — as a holiday special. A quarter of the British population watched it — and many of those hated it.

    Listen to the Fresh Air interview with Paul McCartney.

  2. Fresh Air

    Magical Mystery Tour

    Magical Mystery Tour Revisited

    PBS

    Reviews

    The Beatles

    Paul McCartney

    Interviews

  1. Monday night on PBS, American Masters presents a two-hour biography of Johnny Carson. Carson retired 20 years ago this month, and vacated a throne that TV critic David Bianculli says no one has managed to claim since.
Do you agree? View in High-Res

    Monday night on PBS, American Masters presents a two-hour biography of Johnny Carson. Carson retired 20 years ago this month, and vacated a throne that TV critic David Bianculli says no one has managed to claim since.

    Do you agree?

  2. johnny carson

    late night tv

    american masters

    pbs

  1. One Year Later, Inside Japan’s Nuclear Meltdown View in High-Res

    One Year Later, Inside Japan’s Nuclear Meltdown

  2. fukushima

    japan

    pbs

    frontline

    dan edge

  1. Ameena Matthews, a violence interrupter with the Chicago organization  CeaseFire, mediates disputes to prevent gang violence from escalating. She’s one of the people profiled in the documentary The Interrupters, which will air on Frontline later this week. View in High-Res

    Ameena Matthews, a violence interrupter with the Chicago organization CeaseFire, mediates disputes to prevent gang violence from escalating. She’s one of the people profiled in the documentary The Interrupters, which will air on Frontline later this week.

  2. Ameena Matthews

    ceasefire

    frontline

    the interrupters

    pbs

  1. David Bianculli says the new PBS American Masters look at Woody Allen is “a smart, sometimes serious study of a smart, sometimes  serious filmmaker, and it rivals HBO’s recent two-part George Harrison  documentary as the best TV biography of the season.” View in High-Res

    David Bianculli says the new PBS American Masters look at Woody Allen is “a smart, sometimes serious study of a smart, sometimes serious filmmaker, and it rivals HBO’s recent two-part George Harrison documentary as the best TV biography of the season.”

  2. woody allen

    david bianculli

    american masters

    pbs

    robert weide

  1. David Bianculli explains why the new four-part documentary series called America in Primetime, which premieres this Sunday on PBS, is “the smartest TV show about television I’ve seen in about 20 years.” View in High-Res

    David Bianculli explains why the new four-part documentary series called America in Primetime, which premieres this Sunday on PBS, is “the smartest TV show about television I’ve seen in about 20 years.”

  2. america in primetime

    pbs

    documentary

    tv

    television

    larry david