1. Posted on 1 May, 2014

    538 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from notesondesign

    Down we go! 

    Down we go! 

  2. beach

    sand

    photo break

    ocean

  1. Today journalist  McKenzie Funk  tells Fresh Air about the entrepreneurs looking to cash in on climate change. In the interview he talks about the massive gates designed to protect cities in the event of a large storm surge:

[In the Netherlands] It’s called the Maeslant Storm Surge Barrier (above) and it’s these two Eiffel Tower-sized gates. They swing closed and close the Port of Rotterdam, which is the most important port in all of Europe, it’s where most of the oil and gas come in and it’s where most of everything leaves. They have a huge computer warning system that says, ‘OK, the tides are surging. We need to close the barrier.’ And that actually happened for the second time in history late in 2013, just a few months ago.
… It basically swings closed from both sides and they meet in the middle, these two massive gates and then this piece comes up from below and it closes off the entire harbor — water can’t get in, water can’t get out.
… [The proposed gates to protect Manhattan] would go across the narrows, the area below the Verrazano Bridge. … The storm comes, warning system warns, and the gates swing closed and Manhattan is protected. … We’re talking Statue of Liberty [height] . … Prices are pretty variant at the moment, but [it’s] in the order of $10 billion.




image via MIT View in High-Res

    Today journalist  McKenzie Funk  tells Fresh Air about the entrepreneurs looking to cash in on climate change. In the interview he talks about the massive gates designed to protect cities in the event of a large storm surge:

    [In the Netherlands] It’s called the Maeslant Storm Surge Barrier (above) and it’s these two Eiffel Tower-sized gates. They swing closed and close the Port of Rotterdam, which is the most important port in all of Europe, it’s where most of the oil and gas come in and it’s where most of everything leaves. They have a huge computer warning system that says, ‘OK, the tides are surging. We need to close the barrier.’ And that actually happened for the second time in history late in 2013, just a few months ago.

    … It basically swings closed from both sides and they meet in the middle, these two massive gates and then this piece comes up from below and it closes off the entire harbor — water can’t get in, water can’t get out.

    … [The proposed gates to protect Manhattan] would go across the narrows, the area below the Verrazano Bridge. … The storm comes, warning system warns, and the gates swing closed and Manhattan is protected. … We’re talking Statue of Liberty [height] . … Prices are pretty variant at the moment, but [it’s] in the order of $10 billion.

    image via MIT

  2. fresh air

    climate change

    storm surge

    mckenzie funk

    holland

    manhattan

    ocean

    architecture

  1. Don’t go chasin’ [this] waterfall… because it’s an illusion/super scary 

Ocean trench near Mauritius gives the illusion of a waterfall
via kulfhoto View in High-Res

    Don’t go chasin’ [this] waterfall… because it’s an illusion/super scary

    Ocean trench near Mauritius gives the illusion of a waterfall

    via kulfhoto

  2. fresh air

    waterfall

    TLC

    ocean

    photography

  1. Andrew Smith envelops you in the texture and color of the ocean (Croatia) View in High-Res

    Andrew Smith envelops you in the texture and color of the ocean (Croatia)

  2. andrew smith

    photography

    ocean

    waves

    photo break

  1. Have a relaxing evening, and we’ll see you tomorrow!

    Have a relaxing evening, and we’ll see you tomorrow!

  2. evening photo break

    ocean

    serenity

    beach

  1. Beautiful contrast of hard and soft, light and dark, open and closed in Indonesia. View in High-Res

    Beautiful contrast of hard and soft, light and dark, open and closed in Indonesia.

  2. afternoon photo break

    indonesia

    ocean

  1. Jherek Bischoff tells Terry Gross about sailing between Mexico and Hawaii:

One time, I was helping a friend sail from Mexico to Hawaii, and I was out in the middle of the ocean, and suddenly the ocean went completely still and there was no clouds in the sky — which is actually kind of rare for out in the middle of the ocean. And the wind totally stopped and the ocean was perfectly glassy and, at one point, the stars were a perfect mirror image with the sea. And all of a sudden, I completely lost my sense of direction and which way was up and which way was down, and I felt like I was floating in space because it was just stars completely surrounding me.


Image by Hengki Koentjoro View in High-Res

    Jherek Bischoff tells Terry Gross about sailing between Mexico and Hawaii:

    One time, I was helping a friend sail from Mexico to Hawaii, and I was out in the middle of the ocean, and suddenly the ocean went completely still and there was no clouds in the sky — which is actually kind of rare for out in the middle of the ocean. And the wind totally stopped and the ocean was perfectly glassy and, at one point, the stars were a perfect mirror image with the sea. And all of a sudden, I completely lost my sense of direction and which way was up and which way was down, and I felt like I was floating in space because it was just stars completely surrounding me.

    Image by Hengki Koentjoro

  2. ocean

    Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Jherek Bischoff

    Hengki Koentjoro

  1. Posted on 2 October, 2012

    97,163 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from vicforprez

    Paul Thomas Anderson on loving the ocean

I remember as a kid going to Pearl Harbor, and they have that monument you can go to and it made such an impression on me. You sort of look down into the water. You see fishes moving around, and you have to think about what happened there and all those bodies … and all these kinds of things that have gone in that water. It’s a thought that always sticks with me when I do go into the ocean when I go swimming — all that’s happened and all that’s beneath the surface, and things coming and going. I don’t know — it gets you in a good place of thinking about things in a wider way.

    Paul Thomas Anderson on loving the ocean

    I remember as a kid going to Pearl Harbor, and they have that monument you can go to and it made such an impression on me. You sort of look down into the water. You see fishes moving around, and you have to think about what happened there and all those bodies … and all these kinds of things that have gone in that water. It’s a thought that always sticks with me when I do go into the ocean when I go swimming — all that’s happened and all that’s beneath the surface, and things coming and going. I don’t know — it gets you in a good place of thinking about things in a wider way.

  2. ocean

    Paul Thomas Anderson

    The Master

    Pearl Harbor

  1. Donovan Hohn talks about ‘garbage patches' in the ocean: "When I first heard the phrase ‘garbage patch,’ I imagined something dense. I initially imagined it as a floating junkyard, and you’d have to poke your way through it with a paddle if you’re in a kayak. But it’s not like that. You can’t take a picture of it because that doesn’t exist. What does exist is a whole lot of plastic out there, but it’s spread out over millions of miles of ocean. And some of it floats on the surface where you can find it. And some of it floats just below the surface. And eventually all of it will photodegrade, so much of it is so small you’re not going to be able to see it with the naked eye."
Photo: NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration

    Donovan Hohn talks about ‘garbage patches' in the ocean: "When I first heard the phrase ‘garbage patch,’ I imagined something dense. I initially imagined it as a floating junkyard, and you’d have to poke your way through it with a paddle if you’re in a kayak. But it’s not like that. You can’t take a picture of it because that doesn’t exist. What does exist is a whole lot of plastic out there, but it’s spread out over millions of miles of ocean. And some of it floats on the surface where you can find it. And some of it floats just below the surface. And eventually all of it will photodegrade, so much of it is so small you’re not going to be able to see it with the naked eye."

    Photo: NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration

  2. donovan hohn

    garbage patches

    ocean

    environment

    plastic

    moby-duck

  1. Trash Items Found Most Frequently In The Ocean

      1) cigarette butts
      2) paper pieces
      3) plastic pieces
      4) styrofoam
      5) glass pieces
      6) plastic food bags
      7) plastic caps and lids
      8) metal beverage cans
      9) plastic straws
      10) glass beverage bottles
      11) plastic beverage bottles
      12) styrofoam cups
    Plastics in our Oceans

    (Source: marcons.env.duke.edu)

  2. plastic

    ocean