1. Study: More men on the ‘daddy track’

    More dads than ever before—roughly 550,000 in the past decade and counting—are staying home full-time with their children.


    Read more from NPR’s Jennifer Ludden on stay-at-home dads and breadwinner moms. 

    (Source: pewresearch)

  2. Daddy Track

    NPR

    Wonder Women

    Fresh AIr

  1. Ever wonder what it’s like in the studio of a radio show? Well, here you go. We wanted to share this excellent story with you and recognize Bill Siemering, who revolutionized NPR and is a major reason why Fresh Air became a national program in 1987.

    This podcast takes you into the studio and explains the radio clock:

    There’s a term that epitomizes what we radio producers aspire to create: the “driveway moment.” It’s when a story is so good that you can’t leave your car. Inside of a driveway moment, time becomes elastic–you could be staring straight at a clock for the entire duration of the story, but for that length of time, the clock has no power over you.

    But ironically,  inside the machinery of public radio–the industry that creates driveway moments–the clock rules all.

  2. fresh air

    99percentinvisible

    npr

    bill siemering

    production

    radio

  1. In 1951, an African-American woman named Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with terminal cervical cancer. She was treated at Johns Hopkins University, where a doctor named George Gey snipped cells from her cervix without telling her. Gey discovered that Lacks’ cells could not only be kept alive, but would also grow indefinitely.
For the past 60 years Lacks’ cells have been cultured and used in experiments ranging from determining the long-term effects of radiation to testing the live polio vaccine. Her cells were commercialized and have generated millions of dollars in profit for the medical researchers who patented her tissue.
Lacks’ family, however, didn’t know the cell cultures existed until more than 20 years after her death.
In 2010 we spoke to Medical writer Rebecca Skloot who examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and effect that has had on her family — in her bestselling book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,
Now, 62 years later the Lacks family has given consent to this controversial medical contribution. Researchers who wish to use “HeLa” cells now have to submit a request and proposal that will be reviewed by the Lacks family. This new agreement is in the interest of respecting the family’s privacy, though, they still will not profit financially from any medical study. 
This is a remarkable story, both medically and ethically, about the rights we have to our bodies, even beyond the grave. 
image via NPR

    In 1951, an African-American woman named Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with terminal cervical cancer. She was treated at Johns Hopkins University, where a doctor named George Gey snipped cells from her cervix without telling her. Gey discovered that Lacks’ cells could not only be kept alive, but would also grow indefinitely.

    For the past 60 years Lacks’ cells have been cultured and used in experiments ranging from determining the long-term effects of radiation to testing the live polio vaccine. Her cells were commercialized and have generated millions of dollars in profit for the medical researchers who patented her tissue.

    Lacks’ family, however, didn’t know the cell cultures existed until more than 20 years after her death.

    In 2010 we spoke to Medical writer Rebecca Skloot who examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and effect that has had on her family — in her bestselling book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,


    Now, 62 years later the Lacks family has given consent to this controversial medical contribution. Researchers who wish to use “HeLa” cells now have to submit a request and proposal that will be reviewed by the Lacks family. This new agreement is in the interest of respecting the family’s privacy, though, they still will not profit financially from any medical study.

    This is a remarkable story, both medically and ethically, about the rights we have to our bodies, even beyond the grave.

    image via NPR

  2. fresh air

    henrietta lacks

    HeLa

    Rebecca Skloot

    cancer

    NPR

    new york times

  1. Behind the scenes at Fresh Air. View in High-Res

    Behind the scenes at Fresh Air.

  2. fresh air

    terry gross

    behind the scenes

    npr

    whyy

  1. Because it’s Monday and we chimps have two words on the brains: "More coffee."
"Masterpiece in A Mug: Japanese Latte Art Will Perk You Up" View in High-Res

    Because it’s Monday and we chimps have two words on the brains: "More coffee."

    "Masterpiece in A Mug: Japanese Latte Art Will Perk You Up"

  2. Afternoon Photo Break

    NPR

    Latte Art

  1. Back in 2009, Terry and Danny sent our friends at NPR.org the plant above to congratulate them on winning a Peabody. It has since flourished, even been repotted and given a small, green friend. Given the trauma a big move could have on a small, innocent plant, Fresh Air's Gal In DC, Beth Novey, has kindly updated us as to how our green friend weathered the transition:

The Fresh Air Plant is finally settled in at NPR’s brand new HQ. It is growing very nicely in its new home.

Phew. We can now all sleep easy.
Photo by and courtesy of Beth Novey View in High-Res

    Back in 2009, Terry and Danny sent our friends at NPR.org the plant above to congratulate them on winning a Peabody. It has since flourished, even been repotted and given a small, green friend. Given the trauma a big move could have on a small, innocent plant, Fresh Air's Gal In DC, Beth Novey, has kindly updated us as to how our green friend weathered the transition:

    The Fresh Air Plant is finally settled in at NPR’s brand new HQ. It is growing very nicely in its new home.

    Phew. We can now all sleep easy.

    Photo by and courtesy of Beth Novey

  2. Fresh Air

    Office Life

    NPR

    Peace Plant

    Our Gal Beth Novey

  1. We must try to contribute joy to the world. … That is true no matter what our problems, our health, our circumstances. We must try. I didn’t always know this and am happy I lived long enough to find it out.

    — From Scott Simon’s tribute "Roger Ebert: Elegance and Empathy."

  2. NPR

    Scott Simon

    Roger Ebert

  1. Posted on 14 March, 2013

    211 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nprmusic

    nprmusic:

    What do Best Coast, Boba Fett, Beach Fossils and Lemuria have in common? See photos from day 1 of SXSW.

    Photos: Adam Kissick for NPR

  2. SXSW

    NPR

    afternoon photo break

  1. Friends, ‘The Chronic’ is 20.
NPR’s The Record:


In January 1993, there were still burned-out buildings in South Central Los Angeles. It hadn’t been a year since the acquittal of four police officers in the videotaped beating of Rodney King. Anger at the verdict had not cooled, and you could hear it in the music on the radio, in songs like “Nuthin’ but a G Thang" and "Dre Day," singles off Dr. Dre’s solo debut, released mid-December, 1992.
Dr. Dre’s The Chronic was in part a response to the riots, but its incendiary sound began long before the first match was lit. Five years earlier, his previous group, NWA, put out “F- - - tha Police.” Dre made the beat, and Ice Cube took the first verse.


Image of Dr. Dre and Snoop Doggy Dogg via thebrooklynzoo

    Friends, ‘The Chronic’ is 20.

    NPR’s The Record:

    In January 1993, there were still burned-out buildings in South Central Los Angeles. It hadn’t been a year since the acquittal of four police officers in the videotaped beating of Rodney King. Anger at the verdict had not cooled, and you could hear it in the music on the radio, in songs like “Nuthin’ but a G Thang" and "Dre Day," singles off Dr. Dre’s solo debut, released mid-December, 1992.

    Dr. Dre’s The Chronic was in part a response to the riots, but its incendiary sound began long before the first match was lit. Five years earlier, his previous group, NWA, put out “F- - - tha Police.” Dre made the beat, and Ice Cube took the first verse.

    Image of Dr. Dre and Snoop Doggy Dogg via thebrooklynzoo

  2. Dr. Dre

    Snoop Doggy Dogg

    The Chronic

    LA Riots

    NPR

  1. Posted on 23 August, 2012

    1,310 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nationalpost

    Is this what the future holds?
nationalpost:

‘Toilet Bike Neo’ goes where no john has gone beforeJapanese toilet maker TOTO rolled out a “Toilet Bike Neo” to raise awareness about bathroom emissions and water savings. The eco-friendly three-wheel 250cc motorcycle with a specially customized toilet-shaped seat runs on bio-fuel from the discharge of livestock or waste water. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
View in High-Res

    Is this what the future holds?

    nationalpost:

    ‘Toilet Bike Neo’ goes where no john has gone before
    Japanese toilet maker TOTO rolled out a “Toilet Bike Neo” to raise awareness about bathroom emissions and water savings. The eco-friendly three-wheel 250cc motorcycle with a specially customized toilet-shaped seat runs on bio-fuel from the discharge of livestock or waste water. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

  2. transportation

    eco-friendly

    toilet

    motorcycle

    NPR

    fresh air

  1. Posted on 27 July, 2012

    10,579 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from deejul

    deejul:

Tumblr is ruining my life View in High-Res

    deejul:

    Tumblr is ruining my life

  2. npr

  1. The coolest NPR quilt you will see today.

(via NPR Quilt | how to be jenna)

    The coolest NPR quilt you will see today.

    (via NPR Quilt | how to be jenna)

  2. quilt

    npr

  1. Our works are very much pro-life. We would question, however, any policy that is more pro-fetus than actually pro-life. If the rights of the unborn trump all of the rights of all of those who are already born, that is a distortion too — if there’s such an emphasis on that. However, we have sisters who work in right to life issues. We also have many, many ministries that support life. We dedicate to our lives to those on the margins of society, many of whom are considered throw-away people: the impaired, the chronically mentally ill, the elderly, the incarcerated, to the people on death row. We have strongly spoken out against the death penalty, against war, hunger. All of those are right to life issues. There’s so much being said about abortion that is often phrased in such extreme and such polarizing terms that to choose not to enter into a debate that is so widely covered by other sectors of the Catholic Church — and we have been giving voice to other issues that are less covered but are equally as important.

    — Sister Pat Farrell, on today’s Fresh Air

  2. npr

    sister pat farrell

    religion

    catholic church

  1. Some trusty and tried techniques for summer cooking from America’s Test Kitchen View in High-Res

    Some trusty and tried techniques for summer cooking from America’s Test Kitchen

  2. npr

    america's test kitchen

    cooking

    grilling

    bbq

  1. I do think John Roberts takes himself very seriously and he should, as the custodian of the prestige and legitimacy of the branch of government that he heads. How much that entered his calculations in [the healthcare case], only he knows. But it’s a perfectly appropriate consideration to make sure your branch, which is meant to be disinterested and apolitical and judicial, should not be perceived as yet a third political branch of government. And in the wake of ideological 5-4 decisions like Bush v. Gore and Citizens United, the Court has let itself open to that interpretation and had it struck down the healthcare law 5-4 along ideological lines, there would have been some substantial attack on the credibility of the Court.

    — Adam Liptak on Chief Justice Robert’s legacy

  2. npr

    adam liptak

    supreme court