1. I’m projecting forward, like 10, 15, 20 years in the future, but it could definitely happen that there could be something flying in the air — you’ll just think it’s a little bird hovering around, and instead it’ll have a little camera and be watching what you’re doing and listening to what you say.

    — Noah Shachtman talks about some of the sci-fi-like devices the military and defense contractors are currently working on.

  2. noah shachtman

    wired magazine

    defense

    drone

  1. On today’s Fresh Air, Wired Magazine contributing editor Noah Shachtman details  what he saw when he visited the research and development facility where technicians are developing a device that he says “could amount to the ultimate weapon of this electromagnetic war: a  tool that offers the promise of not only jamming bombs, but finding  them, interrupting GPS signals, eavesdropping on enemy communications,  and disrupting drones, too.” View in High-Res

    On today’s Fresh Air, Wired Magazine contributing editor Noah Shachtman details what he saw when he visited the research and development facility where technicians are developing a device that he says “could amount to the ultimate weapon of this electromagnetic war: a tool that offers the promise of not only jamming bombs, but finding them, interrupting GPS signals, eavesdropping on enemy communications, and disrupting drones, too.”

  2. noah shachtman

    wired magazine

    ied

    iraq

    war

    afghanistan

    danger room

    national security

  1. writinggallery:

    … there’s a sense in the Pentagon that the improvised bomb has now become a permanent threat. Over the last six months, there’s been an average of 245 jury-rigged explosives found or detonated — outside of Iraq and Afghanistan. The IED has gone global.

    Tomorrow we’ll be talking about new weapons and new national security strategies with Noah Shachtman of Wired Magazine.

  2. noah shachtman

    wired magazine

    ied

    weapons

    national security