1. Neuroscientist Suzanne Corkin, author of Permanent Present Tense, talks to Terry Gross about whether it was frustrating to work with Henry Molaison, a patient who had almost no memory:

    "The only thing that was a teeny bit annoying for researchers was if they heard the same story over and over and over again. So, you know, we used to pick up him up at his nursing home and drive him up to MIT and then take him home again, and these car rides were a couple of hours. There were certain billboards along the way that [would] evoke the same story over and over again. Howard Eichenbaum had a funny experience where he had a coffee cup from McDonald’s in his car and every time Henry looked at this, he talked about his friend named so-and-so McDonald, and so after a while Howard got so sick of listening to the story that he put the coffee cup under his seat. But, you know, it was just funny. It wasn’t frustrating or annoying. It was amusing. And this was Henry being Henry. This is what he did. So we just accepted it."

    image via Wikipedia and The Guardian

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Suzanne Corkin

    Henry Molaison

    Neuroscience

    Permanent Present Tense

  1. Currently in the legal system there’s this myth of equality. And the assumption is if you are over 18 and you have an IQ of over 70 then all brains are created equal. And, of course, that’s a very charitable idea but it’s demonstrably false. Brains are extraordinarily different from one another. Brains are essentially like fingerprints; we’ve all got them but they’re somewhat different. And so by imagining that everyone has the exact same capacity for decision-making, for understanding future consequences, for squelching their impulsive behavior and so on, what we’re doing is we’re imagining that everybody should be treated the same. And, of course, what has happened is that our prison system has become our de facto mental health care system. Estimates are that about 30 percent of the prison population has some sort of mental illness.

    — neuroscientist David Eagleman, author of Incognito

  2. David Eagleman

    mental health

    criminal justice

    neuroscience

  1. A lot of people have asked what study Michio Kaku was talking about when he mentioned tape-recorded memories. I think it was the one linked above. 

  2. usc

    neuroscience

    brains

    mice

    learning

  1. Kids who learn two languages young are better able to learn abstract rules and to reverse rules that they’ve already learned. They’re less likely to have difficulty choosing between conflicting possibilities when there are two possible responses that both present themselves. They’re also better at figuring out what other people are thinking, which is probably because they have to figure out which language to use every time they talk to somebody in order to communicate.

    — A neuroscientist explains the benefits of bilingualism today on Fresh Air.

  2. neurology

    neuroscience

    brain

    bilingualism

    language

  1. When you’re planning a tea party, you can’t be acting like a fighter pilot. You have to be acting like a lady having a tea party. So pretending is one of the earliest types of exposure most kids get to planning and organizing their actions. And the more you practice that, the better you’re going to be at it.

    — Two neuroscientists explain how playtime actually can help you immensely later in life.

  2. self-control

    neuroscience

    brain

    playtime

    welcome to your child's brain

  1. Posted on 14 July, 2011

    1,212 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from baked-goods

    baked-goods:

O_O

Neuroscientist Dean Buonomano explains why our brains make mistakes when we try to remember long lists of information or add large numbers in our heads. Humans live “in a time and place we didn’t evolve to live in,” he says.

    baked-goods:

    O_O

    Neuroscientist Dean Buonomano explains why our brains make mistakes when we try to remember long lists of information or add large numbers in our heads. Humans live “in a time and place we didn’t evolve to live in,” he says.

  2. brain

    Dean Buonomano

    Neuroscience

    brain bugs

  1. Posted on 13 July, 2011

    142 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from justsocreative

    alanjhyde:

Oh ho ho Funny man!

Tomorrow: neuroscientist Dean Buonomano. He says our brains are adapted for a prehistoric world very different than our own — and its quirks affect the way we think and behave. (His lab) View in High-Res

    alanjhyde:

    Oh ho ho Funny man!

    Tomorrow: neuroscientist Dean Buonomano. He says our brains are adapted for a prehistoric world very different than our own — and its quirks affect the way we think and behave. (His lab)

  2. Dean Buonomano

    brain

    evolution

    Neuroscience

  1. Audio for Terry’s interview with neuroscientist David Eagleman about decisions, consciousness, religion, stress, crime and time is now up. Enjoy!

  2. terry gross

    david eagleman

    neuroscience

    brain

  1. Monday: Dr. Emery Brown on anesthesia and the brain. 

  2. emery brown

    mit

    harvard

    neuroscience

    anesthesia

    brain

    science

  1. Posted on 18 April, 2011

    706 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from typosaur

    typosaur:

(Image: Bruno Vergauwen)

On today’s show: how a stroke transformed chiropractor Jon Sarkin into an obsessive visual artist whose work was as fragmented and cluttered as his mind had become.  View in High-Res

    typosaur:

    (Image: Bruno Vergauwen)

    On today’s show: how a stroke transformed chiropractor Jon Sarkin into an obsessive visual artist whose work was as fragmented and cluttered as his mind had become. 

  2. jon sarkin

    amy nutt

    shadows bright as glass

    brain

    neuroscience

    stroke