1. Dr. Kevin Fong tells us what it’s like to perform medical procedures in space—like having to velcro astronauts to the floor, and keeping medical tools from floating.
He says being in space takes a physical toll on the astronauts, and how the experience is often uncomfortable:

"When you see space men and women on television you get this impression that it’s sort of like a slightly more fun version of a super long-haul passenger flight that, you know, it’s a quite comfortable experience and they’re just floating around there having quite a lot of fun while engaging in quite a serious task. But when you get down into it, you realize that these expeditions are true expeditions — expeditions really in the same sense that walking into the deserts or climbing our highest mountains, or exploring our polar regions are — that you go into this environment and you learn the same lessons from it that you learn everywhere else in exploration, and that is that we can exist there, but not forever and not without penalty.

[Due to weightlessness] they experience the wasting of their bones, wasting of their muscles, deconditioning of their heart … They have problems with their hand-eye coordination. It seems that the apparatus in your inner ear that detects acceleration that helps you with your day-to-day hand-eye coordination also gets pretty messed up up there and so they have problems tracking moving objects with their eyes, and … they feel pretty sick. In fact, most rookie astronauts feel sick or are sick in the first 24-48 hours of flight. So when you see them up there on camera waving and smiling at you, you have to know that underneath that is a lot of discomfort for lots of them.”


Dr. Fong’s book is called Extreme Medicine: How Exploration Transformed Medicine in the 20th Century

Curious about what it’s like in space? Here’s our popular interview with Commander Chris Hadfield.

photo via softpedia  
Sunita Williams waves at the camera during an Expedition 32 spacewalk, on September 5, 2012 View in High-Res

    Dr. Kevin Fong tells us what it’s like to perform medical procedures in space—like having to velcro astronauts to the floor, and keeping medical tools from floating.

    He says being in space takes a physical toll on the astronauts, and how the experience is often uncomfortable:

    "When you see space men and women on television you get this impression that it’s sort of like a slightly more fun version of a super long-haul passenger flight that, you know, it’s a quite comfortable experience and they’re just floating around there having quite a lot of fun while engaging in quite a serious task. But when you get down into it, you realize that these expeditions are true expeditions — expeditions really in the same sense that walking into the deserts or climbing our highest mountains, or exploring our polar regions are — that you go into this environment and you learn the same lessons from it that you learn everywhere else in exploration, and that is that we can exist there, but not forever and not without penalty.

    [Due to weightlessness] they experience the wasting of their bones, wasting of their muscles, deconditioning of their heart … They have problems with their hand-eye coordination. It seems that the apparatus in your inner ear that detects acceleration that helps you with your day-to-day hand-eye coordination also gets pretty messed up up there and so they have problems tracking moving objects with their eyes, and … they feel pretty sick. In fact, most rookie astronauts feel sick or are sick in the first 24-48 hours of flight. So when you see them up there on camera waving and smiling at you, you have to know that underneath that is a lot of discomfort for lots of them.”

    Dr. Fong’s book is called Extreme Medicine: How Exploration Transformed Medicine in the 20th Century

    Curious about what it’s like in space? Here’s our popular interview with Commander Chris Hadfield.


    photo via softpedia  

    Sunita Williams waves at the camera during an Expedition 32 spacewalk, on September 5, 2012

  2. fresh air

    outer space

    astronaut

    NASA

    kevin fong

    interview

    exploration

  1. Astronaut Commander Chris Hadfield joins Fresh Air tomorrow to tell us about his space walks and share stories of some of his most incredible and terrifying moments in space. 

"It’s just an amazing perspective-building place to be…” View in High-Res

    Astronaut Commander Chris Hadfield joins Fresh Air tomorrow to tell us about his space walks and share stories of some of his most incredible and terrifying moments in space.

    "It’s just an amazing perspective-building place to be…”

  2. fresh air

    interview

    chris hadfield

    NASA

    space

    astronaut

  1. Just hit “Play.” It’s so worth it.

    NASA:

    In the three years since it first provided images of the sun in the spring of 2010, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory has had virtually unbroken coverage of the sun’s rise toward solar maximum, the peak of solar activity in its regular 11-year cycle. This video shows those three years of the sun at a pace of two images per day.

  2. NASA

    The Sun

    These scientists know how to make good video

  1. New York City from space.
(via Gizmodo) View in High-Res

    New York City from space.

    (via Gizmodo)

  2. NASA

  1. Is it even real?
Earth Science Picture of the Day:

The photo above shows a surreal-looking ice cave on the Kamchatka Peninsula of Russia. It was formed by a stream flowing from the hot springs associated with the Mutnovsky volcano. This stream flows beneath glacial ice on the flanks of Mutnovsky. Because glaciers on Kamchatka volcanoes have been melting in recent years, the roof of this cave is now so thin that sunlight penetrates through it, eerily illuminating the icy structures within. Photo taken on September 12, 2012.
View in High-Res

    Is it even real?

    Earth Science Picture of the Day:

    The photo above shows a surreal-looking ice cave on the Kamchatka Peninsula of Russia. It was formed by a stream flowing from the hot springs associated with the Mutnovsky volcano. This stream flows beneath glacial ice on the flanks of Mutnovsky. Because glaciers on Kamchatka volcanoes have been melting in recent years, the roof of this cave is now so thin that sunlight penetrates through it, eerily illuminating the icy structures within. Photo taken on September 12, 2012.

  2. Earth Science Picture of the Day

    NASA

    Ice Caves

    afternoon photo break

  1. Pretty pictures of the Earth.

    NASA | Best of “Earth As Art” — Top Five (by NASAexplorer)

  2. earth

    art

    nasa

  1. Happy Weekend! Catch you Monday, Internet!
2012 04 17 - 3005 - Washington DC - Space Shuttle Discovery (by thisisbossi)

    Happy Weekend! Catch you Monday, Internet!

    2012 04 17 - 3005 - Washington DC - Space Shuttle Discovery (by thisisbossi)

  2. discovery

    space

    nasa

  1. Posted on 4 August, 2011

    9,631 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from lookhigh

    lookhigh:

Sunset, Moonset
On Sunday, July 31, 2011, when Expedition 28 astronaut Ron Garan aboard the International Space Station looked out his window, this is what he saw: the moon. And, he saw it 16 times. Said Garan, “We had simultaneous sunsets and moonsets.” For Garan and the rest of the station crew, this extraordinary event is a daily occurrence. Since the station orbits the Earth every 90 minutes, each day the crew experiences this about 16 times a day. (NASA)
(HT: The Picture Show)

Sunrise…Sunset…. View in High-Res

    lookhigh:

    Sunset, Moonset

    On Sunday, July 31, 2011, when Expedition 28 astronaut Ron Garan aboard the International Space Station looked out his window, this is what he saw: the moon. And, he saw it 16 times. Said Garan, “We had simultaneous sunsets and moonsets.” For Garan and the rest of the station crew, this extraordinary event is a daily occurrence. Since the station orbits the Earth every 90 minutes, each day the crew experiences this about 16 times a day. (NASA)

    (HT: The Picture Show)

    Sunrise…Sunset….

  2. sunrise

    sunset

    nasa

    photography

  1. Posted on 12 July, 2011

    371 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from respicefinem

    respicefinem:

A Launch Photo 30 Years In The Making

This is all kinds of awesome. View in High-Res

    respicefinem:

    A Launch Photo 30 Years In The Making

    This is all kinds of awesome.

  2. photography

    nasa

    space

  1. Posted on 8 July, 2011

    117 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from yearoftheshark

    yearoftheshark:

Liftoff at 15 Seconds, 1982, Jack Perlmutter

3…2…1… View in High-Res

    yearoftheshark:

    Liftoff at 15 Seconds, 1982, Jack Perlmutter

    3…2…1…

  2. nasa

    space

    art

  1. In 1981, when the shuttle program was in its infancy, many thought it seemed unreal. Now, as Atlantis readies to take the program’s final flight, space enthusiasts are looking back at the 30 years as a golden chapter in human exploration.

  2. nasa

    atlantis

  1. Posted on 7 July, 2011

    232 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from 3rdofmay

    3rdofmay:

The art: Joel Sternfeld, The Space Shuttle Columbia Lands at Kelly Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas, 1979.
The news: “What does the final shuttle flight mean for space exploration,” by Ian Sample in The Guardian.
The source: Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

    3rdofmay:

    The art: Joel Sternfeld, The Space Shuttle Columbia Lands at Kelly Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas, 1979.

    The news: “What does the final shuttle flight mean for space exploration,” by Ian Sample in The Guardian.

    The source: Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

  2. nasa

    shuttle

  1. Liftoff. View in High-Res

    Liftoff.

  2. nasa

    endeavour

  1. Astronomy Picture of the Day (via NASA)

  2. nasa

    greece

  1. A fascinating story about a Russian cosmonaut up in space, crying because he knew he was never coming home (photo of the speech prepared just-in-case something happened to Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin had they been marooned or killed.) View in High-Res

    A fascinating story about a Russian cosmonaut up in space, crying because he knew he was never coming home (photo of the speech prepared just-in-case something happened to Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin had they been marooned or killed.)

  2. space

    Vladimir Kamarov

    yuri gagarin

    russia

    nasa

    starman