1. Hardball anchor and political commentator Chris Matthews explains how his interview style is giving the audience what they want:

I was talking to my brother the other day, up in New Jersey and he’s a Republican, held office for years, and he said, “My Republican friends like it, even if you go after a Republican, they like it when you press for an answer. They consider that “hardball”; they consider that to be the nature of the show.
… Ed McMahon of all people said: The key to the interview is to listen to the last answer. And if you’re hearing the last answer equivocation, well, I go for it, I’m heat seeking. I think that’s what I do. I don’t think it’s everyone’s taste, I think on Sunday mornings for example, Meet the Press, that audience may be different. I know when people come looking for me at 7 p.m. Eastern Time, they want that… [I’m] trying to work for the audience.
View in High-Res

    Hardball anchor and political commentator Chris Matthews explains how his interview style is giving the audience what they want:

    I was talking to my brother the other day, up in New Jersey and he’s a Republican, held office for years, and he said, “My Republican friends like it, even if you go after a Republican, they like it when you press for an answer. They consider that “hardball”; they consider that to be the nature of the show.

    Ed McMahon of all people said: The key to the interview is to listen to the last answer. And if you’re hearing the last answer equivocation, well, I go for it, I’m heat seeking. I think that’s what I do. I don’t think it’s everyone’s taste, I think on Sunday mornings for example, Meet the Press, that audience may be different. I know when people come looking for me at 7 p.m. Eastern Time, they want that… [I’m] trying to work for the audience.

  2. fresh air

    interview

    chris matthews

    msnbc

    hardball

  1. Tomorrow: News anchor and political commentator Chris Matthews joins us to talk about his book “Tip and the Gipper: When Politics Worked," and to reflect on his own interview style, as well as his Catholic faith. 
When interviewing Matthews likes to, “race them a little, get them working a little faster than they like to think out loud, so they begin to think just on their feet and they have to answer more impulsively, and that way you can get closer to the truth.”

    Tomorrow: News anchor and political commentator Chris Matthews joins us to talk about his book “Tip and the Gipper: When Politics Worked," and to reflect on his own interview style, as well as his Catholic faith.

    When interviewing Matthews likes to, “race them a little, get them working a little faster than they like to think out loud, so they begin to think just on their feet and they have to answer more impulsively, and that way you can get closer to the truth.”

  2. fresh air

    interview

    chris matthews

    tip and the gipper

    tip o'neill

    ronald reagan

    politics

    msnbc

  1. Chris Hayes tells Terry Gross about how the last decade affected his politics:

My disposition as a human being is kind of a go-along-to-get-along person. I tend to trust authority. I tend to think people in charge broadly know what they’re doing, don’t lie to you, aren’t going start wars for no reason and, you know watching Iraq happen and then watching the financial crisis happen and then Katrina in the middle of that, you know, you turn around and, you think, ‘Wait a second: No one is on top of anything. Who the heck is in charge here? These people who say that they know what they’re doing don’t know what they’re doing. I’m not going to trust them the next time they tell me they know what they’re doing.’ It’s a radically unmooring feeling to recognize that people that you just figured kind of had it under control don’t have it under control and might be totally incompetent or completely corrupt or totally self-dealing.

Image of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina by greenmanowar

    Chris Hayes tells Terry Gross about how the last decade affected his politics:

    My disposition as a human being is kind of a go-along-to-get-along person. I tend to trust authority. I tend to think people in charge broadly know what they’re doing, don’t lie to you, aren’t going start wars for no reason and, you know watching Iraq happen and then watching the financial crisis happen and then Katrina in the middle of that, you know, you turn around and, you think, ‘Wait a second: No one is on top of anything. Who the heck is in charge here? These people who say that they know what they’re doing don’t know what they’re doing. I’m not going to trust them the next time they tell me they know what they’re doing.’ It’s a radically unmooring feeling to recognize that people that you just figured kind of had it under control don’t have it under control and might be totally incompetent or completely corrupt or totally self-dealing.

    Image of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina by greenmanowar

  2. chris+hayes

    Interviews

    Fresh Air

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  1. Posted on 27 March, 2013

    995 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from onthemenjay

    Chris Hayes tells Terry Gross about having people pay attention to his appearance once he started appearing on television:

You start noticing that people are noticing how you look and it is a profoundly alienating experience when it first happens, where you go on TV and you say something about some topic of the day and on the Internet people are like, ‘What was up with that shirt?’ ‘What was up with your hair?’ and you think, ‘Oh, that’s kind of a bummer.’ I think, actually, as a man it was a really useful, tiny sliver — a tiny, empathetic window — into what navigating the world as a woman often is, in which looks are so fore-grounded and so scrutinized and so discussed.


View in High-Res

    Chris Hayes tells Terry Gross about having people pay attention to his appearance once he started appearing on television:

    You start noticing that people are noticing how you look and it is a profoundly alienating experience when it first happens, where you go on TV and you say something about some topic of the day and on the Internet people are like, ‘What was up with that shirt?’ ‘What was up with your hair?’ and you think, ‘Oh, that’s kind of a bummer.’ I think, actually, as a man it was a really useful, tiny sliver — a tiny, empathetic window — into what navigating the world as a woman often is, in which looks are so fore-grounded and so scrutinized and so discussed.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Chris Hayes

    UP

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  1. Keith Olbermann tells Terry Gross about leaving MSNBC, his new show on Current TV, why he thinks large news networks can be stifling, and what he thought about his suspension from MSNBC for donating to political candidates: "If you’re doing a political opinion show and your political opinions are  nearly universally liberal — and you have been caught donating to  Democratic candidates in three instances — I don’t think there’s a  conflict of interest." [complete interview here] View in High-Res

    Keith Olbermann tells Terry Gross about leaving MSNBC, his new show on Current TV, why he thinks large news networks can be stifling, and what he thought about his suspension from MSNBC for donating to political candidates: "If you’re doing a political opinion show and your political opinions are nearly universally liberal — and you have been caught donating to Democratic candidates in three instances — I don’t think there’s a conflict of interest." [complete interview here]

  2. keith olbermann

    msnbc

    current tv

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