1. Maureen Corrigan reviews two graphic novels:

    A Bintel Brief and The Harlem Hellfighters are two New York Stories. That’s why I’m combining them in this review; not because — as some purists still think — they’re lesser works of literature because they’re graphic novels. If Egyptian hieroglyphics, the Bayeux Tapestry, and Art Spiegelman’s 1991 classic, Maus, haven’t yet persuaded the high art holdouts of the value of stories told in visual sequence, nothing I say now about these two books is likely to convince them. Which is a shame because A Bintel Brief by Liana Finck and The Harlem Hellfighters by Max Brooks and illustrated by Caanan White are two of the most powerful books I’ve read so far this year.

    Read/listen to the full review here.

  2. graphic novels

    review

    maureen corrigan

    bintel brief

    harlem hellfighters

  1. Posted on 1 April, 2014

    164 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from airudite

    Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the latest novel from Maggie Shipstead, Astonish Me. After reading her debut novel, Seating Arrangements, Corrigan likened the young author to “Edith Wharton with a millennial generation edge:”

At the center of Shipstead’s tightly choreographed story of frustrated passion and ambition stands Joan Joyce, a dancer whose gifts and discipline are good enough to earn her a place in the corps, but not to propel her into the spotlight as a prima ballerina.
When the novel opens in 1977, Joan has discovered she’s pregnant and she’s decided to keep the baby and leave the ballet. It’s an unforgiving world. Shipstead’s narrator relays Joan’s thoughts about how little she’ll be missed once the other dancers, who keep tight surveillance on one another’s bodies, notice her pregnancy: “When she stops dancing, class will continue on without her, every day except Sunday, part of the earth’s rotation. … Her empty spot at the barre will heal over at once.”


photo via airudite:

torn ballerina [series] by Ana Luísa Pinto [Luminous Photography] on Flickr.
View in High-Res

    Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the latest novel from Maggie Shipstead, Astonish Me. After reading her debut novel, Seating Arrangements, Corrigan likened the young author to “Edith Wharton with a millennial generation edge:”

    At the center of Shipstead’s tightly choreographed story of frustrated passion and ambition stands Joan Joyce, a dancer whose gifts and discipline are good enough to earn her a place in the corps, but not to propel her into the spotlight as a prima ballerina.

    When the novel opens in 1977, Joan has discovered she’s pregnant and she’s decided to keep the baby and leave the ballet. It’s an unforgiving world. Shipstead’s narrator relays Joan’s thoughts about how little she’ll be missed once the other dancers, who keep tight surveillance on one another’s bodies, notice her pregnancy: “When she stops dancing, class will continue on without her, every day except Sunday, part of the earth’s rotation. … Her empty spot at the barre will heal over at once.”

    photo via airudite:

    torn ballerina [series] by Ana Luísa Pinto [Luminous Photography] on Flickr.

    (Source: airudite)

  2. ballet

    dance

    novel

    review

    maureen corrigan

    maggie shipstead

  1. Maureen Corrigan reviews Teju Cole’s Every Day is For The Thief —-

"Let’s get the negative stuff out of the way first. Teju Cole’s Every Day Is For the Thief is not much of a novel. Forget plot or character development: This is a piece of writing that’s all about setting. If you take what Cole is offering here and value it on its own terms, you’ll probably appreciate the curious magic at work in this slim not-quite-a-novel. In chapters that stand as separate, short vignettes, Every Day Is For The Thief describes a young New York doctor’s visit back to his hometown of Lagos, Nigeria. It’s a Clockwork Orange world where policemen routinely stop traffic to collect bribes, where the electricity sputters out at nightly intervals and where 11-year-old thieves are necklaced with kerosene-soaked tires and burned to death. Amidst all the corruption and misery, Cole also makes readers understand the narrator’s longing for a Nigeria he thinks he remembers from childhood.”

Photo via Teju Cole View in High-Res

    Maureen Corrigan reviews Teju Cole’s Every Day is For The Thief —-

    "Let’s get the negative stuff out of the way first. Teju Cole’s Every Day Is For the Thief is not much of a novel. Forget plot or character development: This is a piece of writing that’s all about setting. If you take what Cole is offering here and value it on its own terms, you’ll probably appreciate the curious magic at work in this slim not-quite-a-novel. In chapters that stand as separate, short vignettes, Every Day Is For The Thief describes a young New York doctor’s visit back to his hometown of Lagos, Nigeria. It’s a Clockwork Orange world where policemen routinely stop traffic to collect bribes, where the electricity sputters out at nightly intervals and where 11-year-old thieves are necklaced with kerosene-soaked tires and burned to death. Amidst all the corruption and misery, Cole also makes readers understand the narrator’s longing for a Nigeria he thinks he remembers from childhood.”

    Photo via Teju Cole

  2. Teju Cole

    Every Day is for the Thief

    Open City

    Maureen Corrigan

    Books

    Fresh Air

  1. Picture this. You’re a young girl, living in a remote town in Connecticut in 1825. You’ve taken refuge in a neighbor’s house and, as night falls, you peek out a widow to see your friends and family members assembling outdoors around two crude paintings: One is of a young white woman (you); the other painting is of a man, a Native American.

    As church bells begin to toll, some of the townspeople carry forward fake bodies meant to represent you and the man in the painting; someone else ignites a barrel of tar and the effigies begin burning — an image of looming eternal damnation. You get the message: Stick with your own kind or else.

    This fantastical tableau sounds like something out of an Early American version of The Hunger Games, but it really took place.

    — Maureen Corrigan reviews The Heathen School by historian John Demos, a narrative that “explore[s] how racial categories and attitudes have changed over time in America.”

  2. race

    racism

    history

    nonfiction

    john demos

    native americans

    maureen corrigan

    review

  1. Posted on 5 March, 2014

    177 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from lostsplendor

    Maureen Corrigan reviews Schmuck, by Ross Klavan, a book loosely based on his father Gene Klavan’s ‘legendary’ radio career in mid-20th century New York City:

Klavan clearly has inherited his father’s gift for comedy: Not only is his loony plot the narrative equivalent of a Rube Goldberg contraption (with surprise guest appearances by the likes of Frank Sinatra and comedian Soupy Sales), but the novel is replete with snappy conversations and descriptions. For instance, when the clever Sari is fixed up with a bland, WASP lawyer, she comments that he looks like “the offspring of a tennis court and a yacht.”

 
image via lostsplendor:
New York City, c. 1950 (via Streets of New York, 1950s, by Vivian Maier) View in High-Res

    Maureen Corrigan reviews Schmuck, by Ross Klavan, a book loosely based on his father Gene Klavan’s ‘legendary’ radio career in mid-20th century New York City:

    Klavan clearly has inherited his father’s gift for comedy: Not only is his loony plot the narrative equivalent of a Rube Goldberg contraption (with surprise guest appearances by the likes of Frank Sinatra and comedian Soupy Sales), but the novel is replete with snappy conversations and descriptions. For instance, when the clever Sari is fixed up with a bland, WASP lawyer, she comments that he looks like “the offspring of a tennis court and a yacht.”

     

    image via lostsplendor:

    New York City, c. 1950 (via Streets of New York, 1950s, by Vivian Maier)

  2. gene klavan

    ross klavan

    radio

    review

    maureen corrigan

  1. “Lorrie Moore isn’t quite a household name. This was news to me, because I thought that, given that she’s the kind of writer who’s published in The New Yorker and profiled in The New York Times, most culture vultures would know who she is. But, over the past couple of weeks when I mentioned her new book, Bark, in conversations, both in the halls of academe and over meals with friends, I mostly got blank stares. (One smarty confused her with that other great literary “Lorrie” — the late Laurie Colwin — whose short stories and novels are also essential reading.)
Maybe Lorrie Moore’s muzzy kind of literary fame is due to the fact she doesn’t publish a lot. A warp speed wonder like Joyce Carol Oates publishes 20 books in the time it takes for Moore to crank out a story, but she’s almost always worth the wait.”
-Maureen Corrigan 

photo via etsy

    Lorrie Moore isn’t quite a household name. This was news to me, because I thought that, given that she’s the kind of writer who’s published in The New Yorker and profiled in The New York Times, most culture vultures would know who she is. But, over the past couple of weeks when I mentioned her new book, Bark, in conversations, both in the halls of academe and over meals with friends, I mostly got blank stares. (One smarty confused her with that other great literary “Lorrie” — the late Laurie Colwin — whose short stories and novels are also essential reading.)

    Maybe Lorrie Moore’s muzzy kind of literary fame is due to the fact she doesn’t publish a lot. A warp speed wonder like Joyce Carol Oates publishes 20 books in the time it takes for Moore to crank out a story, but she’s almost always worth the wait.

    -Maureen Corrigan

    photo via etsy

  2. short stories

    bark

    lorrie moore

    fiction

    maureen corrigan

    reivew

  1. On the fence about Thoreau? Maureen Corrigan found a book that might surprise you, because it surprised her. She reviews The Adventures of Henry Thoreau: A Yong Man’s Unlikely Path to Walden Pond by Michael Sims:

Sims’ Thoreau still comes off as a monologue-spouting eccentric who has trouble connecting, especially with women. But, Sims is more persuasive when it comes to his second aim: Emphasizing Thoreau’s crucial shift from a Romantic to a scientific view of nature. Rather than simply waxing poetic about the beauties of Walden Pond when he moved out there in 1845, Thoreau measured it — literally — by walking out on the winter ice and plumbing its depths hundreds of times with a line and sinker. He also recorded the pond’s temperatures and the bloom times of surrounding flowers and plants.
Sims’ Thoreau is most appealing in these stretches when he’s completely absorbed in these apparently random studies — studies that have now become essential to ecologists today who are charting climate change and using them as measures of comparison.
The Adventures of Henry Thoreau is a rich, entertaining testament to the triumph of a young man who never comfortably fit in, but who made a place for himself, nonetheless.


View in High-Res

    On the fence about Thoreau? Maureen Corrigan found a book that might surprise you, because it surprised her. She reviews The Adventures of Henry Thoreau: A Yong Man’s Unlikely Path to Walden Pond by Michael Sims:

    Sims’ Thoreau still comes off as a monologue-spouting eccentric who has trouble connecting, especially with women. But, Sims is more persuasive when it comes to his second aim: Emphasizing Thoreau’s crucial shift from a Romantic to a scientific view of nature. Rather than simply waxing poetic about the beauties of Walden Pond when he moved out there in 1845, Thoreau measured it — literally — by walking out on the winter ice and plumbing its depths hundreds of times with a line and sinker. He also recorded the pond’s temperatures and the bloom times of surrounding flowers and plants.

    Sims’ Thoreau is most appealing in these stretches when he’s completely absorbed in these apparently random studies — studies that have now become essential to ecologists today who are charting climate change and using them as measures of comparison.

    The Adventures of Henry Thoreau is a rich, entertaining testament to the triumph of a young man who never comfortably fit in, but who made a place for himself, nonetheless.

  2. henry david thoreau

    michael sims

    maureen corrigan

    book review

  1. Posted on 5 February, 2014

    14,331 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from cheynesaw

    
"In the opening paragraph of Moby-Dick, Ishmael tells us he takes to sea whenever he feels the onset of  “a damp, drizzly November in [his] soul.”  I know how he feels.  Whenever the frigid funk of February settles in, I, too, yearn to get outta town.  This year I have, thanks to two exquisite vehicles of escape fiction.  Rachel Pastan’s Alena and Katherine Pancol’s The Yellow Eyes of Crocodiles are both smart entertainments perfect for curling up with on a winter’s night.  Admittedly, they both fall into that much-disputed category of “women’s fiction,” but I urge male readers not to feel automatically excluded, much as we women readers have learned to gamely step aboard into boy’s-only clubs like that of, say, The Pequod.”

Maureen Corrigan reviews Alena and The Yellow Eyes of Crocodiles, “ escape fantasies about shy book wormy types triumphing over glossy power divas. ”

    "In the opening paragraph of Moby-Dick, Ishmael tells us he takes to sea whenever he feels the onset of  “a damp, drizzly November in [his] soul.”  I know how he feels.  Whenever the frigid funk of February settles in, I, too, yearn to get outta town.  This year I have, thanks to two exquisite vehicles of escape fiction.  Rachel Pastan’s Alena and Katherine Pancol’s The Yellow Eyes of Crocodiles are both smart entertainments perfect for curling up with on a winter’s night.  Admittedly, they both fall into that much-disputed category of “women’s fiction,” but I urge male readers not to feel automatically excluded, much as we women readers have learned to gamely step aboard into boy’s-only clubs like that of, say, The Pequod.”

    Maureen Corrigan reviews Alena and The Yellow Eyes of Crocodiles, “ escape fantasies about shy book wormy types triumphing over glossy power divas. 

    (Source: cheynesaw)

  2. fresh air

    maureen corrigan

    book review

    alena by rachel pastan

    the yellow eyes of crocodiles

    beach

    escape

    fantasy

    reading

  1. 
"The second best quality Diane Johnson has as a writer is that she’s so smart. Her first best quality — and one that’s far more rare — is that she credits her audience with being smart, too. Whether she’s writing fiction, biography or essays, Johnson lets scenes and conversations speak for themselves, accruing power as they lodge in readers’ minds."

That’s Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan speaking about Diane Johnson and her new memoir, Flyover Lives. Unlike many of her previous books (like Le Divorce and L’Affiare) that take place in Paris, Flyover Lives takes us to Johnson’s roots in the American Midwest.

You can read the review here.

image via Chicago Tribune  View in High-Res

    "The second best quality Diane Johnson has as a writer is that she’s so smart. Her first best quality — and one that’s far more rare — is that she credits her audience with being smart, too. Whether she’s writing fiction, biography or essays, Johnson lets scenes and conversations speak for themselves, accruing power as they lodge in readers’ minds."

    That’s Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan speaking about Diane Johnson and her new memoir, Flyover Lives. Unlike many of her previous books (like Le Divorce and L’Affiare) that take place in Paris, Flyover Lives takes us to Johnson’s roots in the American Midwest.

    You can read the review here.

    image via Chicago Tribune 

  2. fresh air

    book review

    maureen corrigan

    diane johnson

    midwest

    memoir

    le divorce

  1. Maureen Corrigan reviewsChang-Rae Lee’s dystopia On Such a Full Sea: 

Like all dystopian fantasies, On Such a Full Sea requires a high-concept premise, and Lee’s is clever enough: Years before the start of this tale, Earth has been contaminated by rampant industrial development. Chinese workers, eager to flee their dead cities, have been brought over to America to live in labor centers. There, they cultivate food products for the mostly white elite who dwell in heavily fortified “charter” villages that boast the climate controlled amenities of your average suburban mall and hospital center. Beyond the walls of these labor settlements and “charters” stretches a vast wasteland where depravity rules. In accordance with every coming-of-age narrative ever written, our girl Fan is destined to test herself in this wild zone.


image via FT View in High-Res

    Maureen Corrigan reviewsChang-Rae Lee’s dystopia On Such a Full Sea

    Like all dystopian fantasies, On Such a Full Sea requires a high-concept premise, and Lee’s is clever enough: Years before the start of this tale, Earth has been contaminated by rampant industrial development. Chinese workers, eager to flee their dead cities, have been brought over to America to live in labor centers. There, they cultivate food products for the mostly white elite who dwell in heavily fortified “charter” villages that boast the climate controlled amenities of your average suburban mall and hospital center. Beyond the walls of these labor settlements and “charters” stretches a vast wasteland where depravity rules. In accordance with every coming-of-age narrative ever written, our girl Fan is destined to test herself in this wild zone.

    image via FT

  2. fresh air

    maureen corrigan

    on such a full sea

    chang-rae lee

    dystopia

  1. Posted on 9 January, 2014

    3,770 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from wendesgray

    Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Out Of The Woods by Lynn Darling:

"Midway upon the journey of our life I found myself within a forest dark, For the straightforward pathway had been lost.”


Allowing for translation, those are the immortal opening lines of Dante’s Divine Comedy. Here, some seven centuries later, are some of Lynn Darling’s opening lines from her new memoir, Out Of The Woods: “The summer my only child left home for college, I moved from an apartment in New York City, to live alone in a small house at the end of a dirt road in the woods of central Vermont.” Darling’s personal version of Dante’s dark night of the soul will resonate with many empty nesters, especially women.
View in High-Res

    Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Out Of The Woods by Lynn Darling:

    "Midway upon the journey of our life
    I found myself within a forest dark,
    For the straightforward pathway had been lost.”

    Allowing for translation, those are the immortal opening lines of Dante’s Divine Comedy. Here, some seven centuries later, are some of Lynn Darling’s opening lines from her new memoir, Out Of The Woods: “The summer my only child left home for college, I moved from an apartment in New York City, to live alone in a small house at the end of a dirt road in the woods of central Vermont.” Darling’s personal version of Dante’s dark night of the soul will resonate with many empty nesters, especially women.

  2. fresh air

    maureen corrigan

    out of the woods

    vermont

    forrest

    dante

  1. Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews “The Trip to Echo Spring" by Olivia Laing. It’s part memoir, part history about the connection between writing and drinking:

Olivia Laing, wisely, doesn’t reach any one-size-fits-all conclusions about the bond between the pen and the bottle. Some of her writers drink, it seems, to quell panic and self-disgust; others as a stimulant; others for who-knows-what reason. And, though she’s a marvelous writer herself, Laing sticks to her original premise that alcoholic writers are the most eloquent chroniclers of their own addiction. In that spirit then, I’ll let poet John Berryman have the last word on the awful alliance between drinking and writing. This is a stanza that Laing quotes from Berryman’s “Dream Songs”:
Hunger was constitutional with him, wine, cigarettes, liquor, need need needUntil he went to pieces.The pieces sat up & wrote.


Photo of Ernest Hemingway pouring a glass View in High-Res

    Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews “The Trip to Echo Spring" by Olivia Laing. It’s part memoir, part history about the connection between writing and drinking:

    Olivia Laing, wisely, doesn’t reach any one-size-fits-all conclusions about the bond between the pen and the bottle. Some of her writers drink, it seems, to quell panic and self-disgust; others as a stimulant; others for who-knows-what reason. And, though she’s a marvelous writer herself, Laing sticks to her original premise that alcoholic writers are the most eloquent chroniclers of their own addiction. In that spirit then, I’ll let poet John Berryman have the last word on the awful alliance between drinking and writing. This is a stanza that Laing quotes from Berryman’s “Dream Songs”:

    Hunger was constitutional with him,
    wine, cigarettes, liquor, need need need
    Until he went to pieces.
    The pieces sat up & wrote.

    Photo of Ernest Hemingway pouring a glass

  2. review

    maureen corrigan

    the trip to echo spring

    olivia laing

    drinking

    writing

    alcohol

    john berryman


  1. First, a word about this list: it’s honestly just a fluke that my best books rundown for 2013 is so gender biased. I didn’t deliberately set out this year to read so many terrific books by women.


    Lets start with Alice McDermott. Without ever hamming up the humility, Alice McDermott’s latest novel, Someone, tells the life story of an ordinary woman named Marie who comes of age in mid-twentieth century Brooklyn and works for a time in a funeral parlor. McDermott reveals to readers what’s distinct about people like Marie who don’t have the ego or eloquence to make a case for themselves as being anything special.

    Unlike McDermott’s submissive Marie, the main character of The Woman Upstairs, Claire Messud’s latest novel, is like a dormant volcano getting ready to blow.  Nora Eldridge is a single elementary school teacher in her thirties who’s grimly disciplined herself to settling for less.  When a glamorous family enters her life and reignites her artistic and erotic energies, Nora, like Jane Eyre, gets in touch with her anger and her hunger.  Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Lowland is another stark novel that charts the fate of two brothers in Calcutta in the 1960s, one a political activist; the other a stick-in-the-mud academic.  The Lowland is an ambitious story about the rashness of youth as well as the hesitation and regret that can make a long life not worth living.  

    Ambition is what makes Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch my novel of the year: jumbo-sized, coincidence-laced, it’s Dickensian in its cast of characters and range of emotions.  In fact, there’s a lot of David Copperfield in the main character, Theo Decker, who’s thirteen when the sudden death of his mother propels him on a cross-country odyssey that includes a season in hell in Las Vegas and brushes with the Russian mob.  Always yearning for his lost mother; Theo is like the goldfinch in the 17th century Dutch painting that gives this extraordinary novel its name: an alert yellow bird “chained to a perch by its twig of an ankle.”


    My debut novel of the year is Adelle Waldman’s brilliant comedy of manners and ideas, The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P.  Waldman thoroughly inhabits the head of a sensitive cad named Nate Piven, a writer living in Brooklyn.  There are many throwaway moments of hilarity here, such as when Nate endures his weekly telephone chat with his father, who asks him the question every aspiring writer is asked nowadays:  “Have you given any thought to self publishing?”


    A boy-girl pair ties for my for best short story collection nod:  Karen Russell’s Vampires in the Lemon Grove contains some genuine creepers, like “Proving Up,” a tale of the American Frontier that reads like a collaboration between Willa Cather and Emily Dickinson.  The standout in George Saunders’ collection, The Tenth of December, is “The Semplica Girl Diaries”—a story whose power could singlehandedly change immigration policy.  


    In biography, the winner for me this year was Jill Lepore’s Book of Ages about Jane Franklin, Ben’s little sister.  To excavate the remains of Jane’s hidden story, Lepore augments her own training as a historian with literary criticism, sociology, archeology and even some of the techniques of fiction. 

    Patricia Volk’s boisterous memoir, Shocked, also breaks traditional genre rules. Shocked explores the two titanic women who impressed their ideas of beauty and femaleness on Volk: her mother, Audrey, a famous beauty, and the designer Elsa Schiaparelli.  In her writing and in her memoir’s gorgeous illustrations, Volk has embraced something of Schiaparelli’s surrealist approach to art. Roger Rosenblatt’s evocative memoir, The Boy Detective, also challenges easy categorization.  His book combines a walking tour around vanished Manhattan, with a meditation, not only on the classic mystery fiction he loves, but also on those larger metaphysical mysteries that defy even the shrewdest detective’s reasoning.


    Speaking, at last, of mysteries, my best mystery of the year turns out to be yet another stunner from Scandinavia.  The Dinosaur Feather is a debut novel by a Dane named S. J. Gazan, which takes us deep into the insular world of scientists investigating dinosaur evolution.  I could be wrong (but I don’t think I am) when I say that Gazan disposes of a murder victim here by an infernal means that no other mystery writer — not even the resourceful Dame Agatha — ever concocted. And, yes, in case you’re wondering, S. J. Gazan is a woman.  Everybody knows the female of the species is deadlier than the male. 

    Happy Reading to one and all.



    The list is available here with audio and links to the reviews

  2. fresh air

    reviews

    maureen corrigan

    best of 2013

    books

    reading

    npr books

  1. Because it’s December 10th, let’s revisit Maureen Corrigan’s review of George Saunders' bestseller collection of short stories, “Tenth of December.”

Saunders’ short stories have it all — the flexibility of language, the social criticism, the moral ambition, the entertaining dark humor. Check back with me at the end of 2013; if his collection isn’t in this year’s top 10, it will really have been an extraordinary year for books.


Tenth of December was a finalist for the National Book Award in fiction

image via telegraph UK View in High-Res

    Because it’s December 10th, let’s revisit Maureen Corrigan’s review of George Saunders' bestseller collection of short stories, “Tenth of December.”

    Saunders’ short stories have it all — the flexibility of language, the social criticism, the moral ambition, the entertaining dark humor. Check back with me at the end of 2013; if his collection isn’t in this year’s top 10, it will really have been an extraordinary year for books.

    Tenth of December was a finalist for the National Book Award in fiction

    image via telegraph UK

  2. fresh air

    maureen corrigan

    george saunders

    tenth of december

    national book award

  1. Book critic Maureen Corrigan has some recommended reading for the all-too-rare holiday of Thanksgivukkah:

Mark your calendars: according to some scholars the next time it might happen is the year 79,811.  I’m talking, of course, about the hybrid holiday of “Thanksgivukkah.” The Borsch Belt-style Pilgrim jokes and mish mosh recipes (turkey brined in Manischewitz anyone?) are flying around the Internet; but since Jews are frequently referred to as “the people of the book” and Pilgrims pretty much lived by the book, Thanksgivukkah seems to me like the quintessential (stressful) family holiday to celebrate by escaping into a book.  A couple of these recommendations are holiday themed; some are not—but all will have you saying “Thanks a lattke!” for the all-year-round gift of reading.



"Menurkey" image via Thanksgivukkah boston View in High-Res

    Book critic Maureen Corrigan has some recommended reading for the all-too-rare holiday of Thanksgivukkah:

    Mark your calendars: according to some scholars the next time it might happen is the year 79,811.  I’m talking, of course, about the hybrid holiday of “Thanksgivukkah.” The Borsch Belt-style Pilgrim jokes and mish mosh recipes (turkey brined in Manischewitz anyone?) are flying around the Internet; but since Jews are frequently referred to as “the people of the book” and Pilgrims pretty much lived by the book, Thanksgivukkah seems to me like the quintessential (stressful) family holiday to celebrate by escaping into a book.  A couple of these recommendations are holiday themed; some are not—but all will have you saying “Thanks a lattke!” for the all-year-round gift of reading.

    "Menurkey" image via Thanksgivukkah boston

  2. fresh air

    maureen corrigan

    thanksgiving

    Hanukkah

    thanksgivukkah

    books

    menurkey