1. Posted on 21 October, 2013

    7,891 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from riverheadbooks

    What’s the most famous book set in your home state? Do you agree? 


via nprbooks View in High-Res

    What’s the most famous book set in your home state? Do you agree?

    via nprbooks

  2. fresh air

    books

    npr books

    map

  1. Today we’re taking a journey to the center of the Internet to learn about the data centers and structures that make our web work.
(Pictured: a map of the Internet from 2005.) View in High-Res

    Today we’re taking a journey to the center of the Internet to learn about the data centers and structures that make our web work.

    (Pictured: a map of the Internet from 2005.)

  2. map

    internet

    chart

    andrew blum

  1. The Sleepiest States: “The findings suggest that, in general, those in the South are most  likely to report sleep disturbance and daytime fatigue, and those in the  West are least likely.”

    The Sleepiest States: “The findings suggest that, in general, those in the South are most likely to report sleep disturbance and daytime fatigue, and those in the West are least likely.”

  2. zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

    sleep

    chart

    map

  1. Posted on 23 September, 2011

    81 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from 3rdofmay

    3rdofmay:

The art: Johannes Vermeer, Officer and Laughing Girl, c.1657.
The news: “Love Longitude? ‘Maphead’ Locates Geography Buffs,” on NPR’s Fresh Air. Former ‘Jeopardy!’ champ Ken Jennings has written a new book about maps. He was on Fresh Air yesterday.
The source: Collection of The Frick Collection, New York.
Nota bene: From Vermeer to Jasper Johns, artists have long used maps to tell us something about our world. Vermeer may have used maps in many of his paintings to suggest that the characters in his paintings were naval officers on a courtship visit or that the women in the paintings were writing to or pining for men in the navy. Then again, Vermeer may have used them for other reasons altogether — art historians have been debating this topic for years.

    3rdofmay:

    The art: Johannes Vermeer, Officer and Laughing Girl, c.1657.

    The news: “Love Longitude? ‘Maphead’ Locates Geography Buffs,” on NPR’s Fresh Air. Former ‘Jeopardy!’ champ Ken Jennings has written a new book about maps. He was on Fresh Air yesterday.

    The source: Collection of The Frick Collection, New York.

    Nota bene: From Vermeer to Jasper Johns, artists have long used maps to tell us something about our world. Vermeer may have used maps in many of his paintings to suggest that the characters in his paintings were naval officers on a courtship visit or that the women in the paintings were writing to or pining for men in the navy. Then again, Vermeer may have used them for other reasons altogether — art historians have been debating this topic for years.

  2. art

    map

    geography

    Fresh Air

  1. Do you ever read an atlas for pleasure? If you go to a new city, can you imagine not knowing which way is north? Is it hard for you to imagine life without a map? 
Then you might be a maphead, says trivia buff Ken Jennings.



Philadelphia rail map - 1972 (by rjwhite)

    Do you ever read an atlas for pleasure? If you go to a new city, can you imagine not knowing which way is north? Is it hard for you to imagine life without a map?

    Then you might be a maphead, says trivia buff Ken Jennings.

    Philadelphia rail map - 1972 (by rjwhite)

  2. map

    ken jennings

    maphead

  1. crookedindifference:

World Map by Johannes Kepler, 1627
View in High-Res

    crookedindifference:

    World Map by Johannes Kepler, 1627

  2. kepler

    map

  1. Posted on 12 April, 2011

    104 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from usagov

    usagov:


Commercial lithographer Henry S. Graham printed this choropleth map showing the distribution of the slave population in September 1861. The map shows in graphic terms the density of the slave population in the Southern states, based on figures from the 1860 census. Although the development of this map was a collaborative government effort, cartographers working for Edwin Hergesheimer, U.S. Coast Survey Drafting Division, created it.

Learn more about this map and other Civil War maps and charts from the United States Office of Coast Survey.
View in High-Res

    usagov:

    Commercial lithographer Henry S. Graham printed this choropleth map showing the distribution of the slave population in September 1861. The map shows in graphic terms the density of the slave population in the Southern states, based on figures from the 1860 census. Although the development of this map was a collaborative government effort, cartographers working for Edwin Hergesheimer, U.S. Coast Survey Drafting Division, created it.

    Learn more about this map and other Civil War maps and charts from the United States Office of Coast Survey.

  2. map

    chart

    civil war

  1. 
I am listening to the Fresh Air podcast (Sam Chwat interview), and thought you might enjoy this American Dialect map for the FreshAir Tumblr.

Thanks Lucas! (who doesn’t have a blog) View in High-Res

    I am listening to the Fresh Air podcast (Sam Chwat interview), and thought you might enjoy this American Dialect map for the FreshAir Tumblr.

    Thanks Lucas! (who doesn’t have a blog)

  2. sam chwat

    map

    chart

    american dialect

  1. Posted on 2 March, 2011

    115 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nprinterns

    nprinterns:

On  Assignment: Getting Music for NPR Programming
View in High-Res

    nprinterns:

    On Assignment: Getting Music for NPR Programming

  2. map

    chart

    nprinterns

    npr

  1. A visualization of tweets sent on New Year’s Eve 2010
US (by Twitter) View in High-Res

    A visualization of tweets sent on New Year’s Eve 2010

    US (by Twitter)

  2. flickr

    twitter

    visualization

    map

    united states

    tweets

  1. When you superimpose a soccer field on top of NASA’s map, it turns out  Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin — the entire time they were there — barely crossed  90 yards of moon! What Neil called “a giant leap for mankind” wasn’t  quite as giant as it seemed. Oh, the trip was a “leap” to be sure, a  fantastic accomplishment, but the first moon explorers explored an  astonishingly small area. View in High-Res

    When you superimpose a soccer field on top of NASA’s map, it turns out Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin — the entire time they were there — barely crossed 90 yards of moon! What Neil called “a giant leap for mankind” wasn’t quite as giant as it seemed. Oh, the trip was a “leap” to be sure, a fantastic accomplishment, but the first moon explorers explored an astonishingly small area.

  2. map

    scale of size

    robert krulwich