1. New York Times Mideast Correspondent David Kirkpatrick went to Benghazi after the 2012 attack on the U.S. Diplomatic Mission that killed 4 Americans, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens.  Today he shares some of the questions he hoped to answer in his investigation:

The killing of Ambassador Stevens had become a major issue in American politics and also just a murder mystery. There was an astonishing number and variety of theories about how and why he had died on the night of Sept. 11, 2012 at the American Diplomatic Mission in Benghazi.
Part of what was so astounding about the debate and the variety of the theories is that it was an event that took place more or less in the open. It wasn’t like someone surreptitiously stuck a car bomb under his car, or quietly assassinated him with a sniper’s bullet; this was an event that drew a crowd, a crowd that grew all night, where there were dozens or hundreds of witnesses to the main events.
When I visited Benghazi in the immediate aftermath, I got the feeling that a lot of people in Benghazi actually had a pretty good idea of what went down. So I felt, and my editors felt, like that — given that this was a pressing question of political consequence and public interest in the United States — the least we could do is spend some time in Benghazi asking the people who actually live there what happened.



photo by STR/AFP/Getty Images via NPR View in High-Res

    New York Times Mideast Correspondent David Kirkpatrick went to Benghazi after the 2012 attack on the U.S. Diplomatic Mission that killed 4 Americans, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens.  Today he shares some of the questions he hoped to answer in his investigation:

    The killing of Ambassador Stevens had become a major issue in American politics and also just a murder mystery. There was an astonishing number and variety of theories about how and why he had died on the night of Sept. 11, 2012 at the American Diplomatic Mission in Benghazi.

    Part of what was so astounding about the debate and the variety of the theories is that it was an event that took place more or less in the open. It wasn’t like someone surreptitiously stuck a car bomb under his car, or quietly assassinated him with a sniper’s bullet; this was an event that drew a crowd, a crowd that grew all night, where there were dozens or hundreds of witnesses to the main events.

    When I visited Benghazi in the immediate aftermath, I got the feeling that a lot of people in Benghazi actually had a pretty good idea of what went down. So I felt, and my editors felt, like that — given that this was a pressing question of political consequence and public interest in the United States — the least we could do is spend some time in Benghazi asking the people who actually live there what happened.

    photo by STR/AFP/Getty Images via NPR

  2. benghazi

    terrorism

    david kirkpatrick

    new york times

    world news

    libya

    christopher stevens

  1. Well, I’ve always said I’m not by temperament romantic about revolutions or given to revolution. I’ve always thought that they are not the ideal way to change, but we were in a situation where we didn’t have any other option and so, in this case, we had to have a revolution. But revolutions — and history shows them to be incredibly temperamental things — they call for excitement and violence and blood and impatience, all the things that I … personally, that I fear and dislike.

    — Hisham Matar tells Terry Gross about his thoughts on revolution, specifically the one last year in Libya.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Hisham Matar

    Libya

    The Return

    The New Yorker

  1. Hisham Matar talks to Terry Gross about how, while his father was a political prisoner in Libya, he would recite poetry for himself and the other prisoners. Matar’s father was kidnapped in 1990 and Matar never saw him again.:

It was an astonishing demonstration and victory on his part, on an old argument that he and I had because, like most children, I wasn’t exactly excited about being obliged to memorize pages and pages of text, and he would try to convince me about the virtues of doing such a thing, that it would teach you about language. He described it once, he said, ‘I… [R]eading a poem is like a bird flying over a forest but memorizing it is like that same bird walking through the forest. …” So he would give me all these examples to try to sell me the idea of memorizing these poems, which i did and later of course learned other virtues — many wonderful virtues — of memorizing text, that it does feel like company in a sense. But this story of him reciting poems to comfort himself and others in prison was just another demonstration of how right he was and it made me feel, it made me feel, I was happy for him to have had these poems in his chest, that they were there to delight and comfort perhaps and entertain him and others.

When he was a child Matar’s father had told him that “knowing a book by heart is like carrying a house inside your chest.”
image by catinthecupboard

    Hisham Matar talks to Terry Gross about how, while his father was a political prisoner in Libya, he would recite poetry for himself and the other prisoners. Matar’s father was kidnapped in 1990 and Matar never saw him again.:

    It was an astonishing demonstration and victory on his part, on an old argument that he and I had because, like most children, I wasn’t exactly excited about being obliged to memorize pages and pages of text, and he would try to convince me about the virtues of doing such a thing, that it would teach you about language. He described it once, he said, ‘I… [R]eading a poem is like a bird flying over a forest but memorizing it is like that same bird walking through the forest. …” So he would give me all these examples to try to sell me the idea of memorizing these poems, which i did and later of course learned other virtues — many wonderful virtues — of memorizing text, that it does feel like company in a sense. But this story of him reciting poems to comfort himself and others in prison was just another demonstration of how right he was and it made me feel, it made me feel, I was happy for him to have had these poems in his chest, that they were there to delight and comfort perhaps and entertain him and others.

    When he was a child Matar’s father had told him that “knowing a book by heart is like carrying a house inside your chest.”

    image by catinthecupboard

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Hisham Matar

    The Return

    Libya

    Abu Salim prison

    The New Yorker

  1. I remember, it remains one of the scariest moments of my life, … you just have to make peace very quickly with the idea that it’s over. And I remember looking up at that soldier and he says, ‘Shoot them’ in Arabic and you just lose every sensation at that point.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, New York Times war correspondent Anthony Shadid describes being captured and beaten by Gadhafi’s forces in Libya last March. 

  2. anthony shadid

    libya

  1. In March, veteran foreign correspondent Anthony Shadid and three other journalists were held and beaten by security forces in Libya. On today’s Fresh Air, Shadid talks about his experiences in Libya and why he decided to continue reporting from conflict zones. In the past year, he’s covered the Arab uprisings in Egypt, Libya, Syria, Bahrain and Tunisia. Before that, he covered the Iraq War for nearly a decade

  2. anthony shadid

    libya

    syria

    middle east

    arab spring

    journalism

  1. Some recent coverage of Libya on Fresh Air includes

  2. libya

    Moammar Gadhaf

  1. NBC News chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel details what it’s like to report from some of the more dangerous war zones on the planet. He also discusses his recent dispatches from Egypt and Libya, where he was subject to tear gas attacks and artillery fire. View in High-Res

    NBC News chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel details what it’s like to report from some of the more dangerous war zones on the planet. He also discusses his recent dispatches from Egypt and Libya, where he was subject to tear gas attacks and artillery fire.

  2. richard engel

    nbc news

    journalism

    war

    war reporting

    libya

    iraq

    afghanistan

    sept 11

  1. Guns. Cars. Artwork. Statues.
And an album full of photos of former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.
Odd  as that may sound, what appears to be something of a keepsake about  Rice — who Moammar Gadhafi once referred to as “my darling black African  woman” and of whom he said, “I love her very much” — was found by  opposition fighters as they searched and ransacked the Libyan leader’s  compound in Tripoli. View in High-Res

    Guns. Cars. Artwork. Statues.

    And an album full of photos of former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.

    Odd as that may sound, what appears to be something of a keepsake about Rice — who Moammar Gadhafi once referred to as “my darling black African woman” and of whom he said, “I love her very much” — was found by opposition fighters as they searched and ransacked the Libyan leader’s compound in Tripoli.

  2. libya

    condoleezza rice

  1.  
From NPR
At A Glance: What’s Happening In Libya

Mustafa Abdel Jalil, chairman of the National Transitional Council, declared “the era of Gadhafi is over” at a Monday news conference in Benghazi.
Crowds in the capital, Tripoli, the rebel stronghold of Benghazi and elsewhere have poured into the streets to celebrate.
Fighting continues in pockets of the capital, including around Gadhafi’s compound at Bab al-Aziziya. The rebel leadership tells NPR it could still be a week before Tripoli is secured.
Moammar Gadhafi’s whereabouts are unknown, but rebels quickly captured one of his sons, Seif al-Islam. Another son, Mohammed, is apparently under house arrest.
President Obama has promised U.S. cooperation with the rebels, and British Prime Minister David Cameron says frozen Libyan assets will be released soon.

For the latest developments, check The Two-Way news blog and follow NPR’s Andy Carvin, who is rounding up reports from Libyans and others on Twitter (@acarvin).

     

    From NPR

    At A Glance: What’s Happening In Libya

    • Mustafa Abdel Jalil, chairman of the National Transitional Council, declared “the era of Gadhafi is over” at a Monday news conference in Benghazi.
    • Crowds in the capital, Tripoli, the rebel stronghold of Benghazi and elsewhere have poured into the streets to celebrate.
    • Fighting continues in pockets of the capital, including around Gadhafi’s compound at Bab al-Aziziya. The rebel leadership tells NPR it could still be a week before Tripoli is secured.
    • Moammar Gadhafi’s whereabouts are unknown, but rebels quickly captured one of his sons, Seif al-Islam. Another son, Mohammed, is apparently under house arrest.
    • President Obama has promised U.S. cooperation with the rebels, and British Prime Minister David Cameron says frozen Libyan assets will be released soon.

    For the latest developments, check The Two-Way news blog and follow NPR’s Andy Carvin, who is rounding up reports from Libyans and others on Twitter (@acarvin).

  2. libya

    news

  1. Audio’s up for Terry’s conversation with CJ Chivers about Libya. View in High-Res

    Audio’s up for Terry’s conversation with CJ Chivers about Libya.

  2. cj chivers

    libya

  1. Just an Observation….
Reporting in Libya and Dodging Bullets, Bombs
'Whip Smart': Memoirs of a Dominatrix (original air date March 8, 2010) View in High-Res

    Just an Observation….

    Reporting in Libya and Dodging Bullets, Bombs

    'Whip Smart': Memoirs of a Dominatrix (original air date March 8, 2010)

  2. cj chivers

    libya

    melissa febos

    dominatrix

  1. It sounded like the sky falling and I knew immediately what it was because I had been close to a bunch of airstrikes in Afghanistan. I had enough time for one thought. It was kind of two words fused as one. I thought, ‘Airstrike. Dead.’ And I thought they got us.

    — CJ Chivers tells Terry Gross about a recent NATO airstrike in Libya…that almost killed him, his driver and his translator.

  2. cj chivers

    nato

    libya

  1. Posted on 27 July, 2011

    375 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from kero39

    kero39:

Libyan Rebels Gain Inches Toward Link to Tripoli
- NYTimes.com July 6, 2011

Tomorrow: CJ Chivers (who wrote this piece) on Libya View in High-Res

    kero39:

    Libyan Rebels Gain Inches Toward Link to Tripoli

    - NYTimes.com
    July 6, 2011

    Tomorrow: CJ Chivers (who wrote this piece) on Libya

  2. cj chivers

    new york times

    libya

  1. Tomorrow’s Fresh Air: Democracy movements are sweeping across the Middle East. But the dramatic changes in Egypt, Tunisia, Libya and Syria have not yet come to the West Bank. If and when that does occur, it could be a game-changer for Israel and the United States according to Robert Malley. He’s the program director for the Middle East and North Africa at the International Crisis Group. View in High-Res

    Tomorrow’s Fresh Air: Democracy movements are sweeping across the Middle East. But the dramatic changes in Egypt, Tunisia, Libya and Syria have not yet come to the West Bank. If and when that does occur, it could be a game-changer for Israel and the United States according to Robert Malley. He’s the program director for the Middle East and North Africa at the International Crisis Group.

  2. middle east

    arab spring

    robert malley

    international crisis group

    syria

    libya

    egypt

    israel

    west bank

  1. Posted on 27 April, 2011

    215 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from npr

    npr:

A Libyan opposition soldier raises the independence flag over a highrise building in Misurata after Gaddafi forces were defeated in the city center. Photo courtesy of Misurata Freedom Group.

Today: The New Yorker’s Ryan Lizza details how recent clashes in the Middle East have remade President Obama’s foreign policy.  View in High-Res

    npr:

    A Libyan opposition soldier raises the independence flag over a highrise building in Misurata after Gaddafi forces were defeated in the city center. Photo courtesy of Misurata Freedom Group.

    Today: The New Yorker’s Ryan Lizza details how recent clashes in the Middle East have remade President Obama’s foreign policy. 

  2. ryan lizza

    the new yorker

    foreign policy

    president obama

    libya