1. In the 1860’s it was the Republican Party in Washington - the home of former abolitionists – that sought to grant legal rights and social equality to blacks in the South. The Democrats of the day had broad support among white Southerners and conservatives in the North.
The Republicans, then dubbed radical Republicans, managed to enact a series of constitutional amendments and reconstruction acts granting legal equality to former slaves, giving them access to federal courts if their rights were violated. But Lawrence Goldstone says that in a series of cowardly rulings, the Supreme Court undermined those laws, and laid the basis for years of lynchings and Jim Crow rules in the South. View in High-Res

    In the 1860’s it was the Republican Party in Washington - the home of former abolitionists – that sought to grant legal rights and social equality to blacks in the South. The Democrats of the day had broad support among white Southerners and conservatives in the North.

    The Republicans, then dubbed radical Republicans, managed to enact a series of constitutional amendments and reconstruction acts granting legal equality to former slaves, giving them access to federal courts if their rights were violated. But Lawrence Goldstone says that in a series of cowardly rulings, the Supreme Court undermined those laws, and laid the basis for years of lynchings and Jim Crow rules in the South.

  2. supreme court

    lawrence goldstone

    inherently unequal

    African-American history

    republicans

  1. All you have to do is look at the rise of Jim Crow and the ability of Southern state governments to segregate, to discriminate, to imprison without trial, to beat to death, to lynch — without anyone ever being brought to justice. It was only possible because the Court had very slowly chipped away at [the Civil Rights Act of 1875 and the Fourteenth Amendment.]

    — Lawrence Goldstone, explaining how the Supreme Court’s rulings between 1875 and 1903 suppressed the civil rights movement in the latter half of the 19th century and impacted the treatment of African-Americans in Southern states for decades,

  2. civil rights

    African-American history

    fourteenth amendment

    lawrence goldstone

    inherently unequal

    jim crow laws