1. I don’t think anyone sets out to change the world, and I think if you have that delusion going into journalism you’re going to end up disappointed. All you can do is write what you feel, stick to your conscience, stick to your guns, and sometimes it’s not always popular, but the readers do respond, I will say that.

    — 

    Carl Hiaasen 

    Hiaasen’s latest book, Bad Monkey, is now in paperback 

  2. carl hiaasen

    bad monkey

    journalism

    interview

    fresh air

  1. New York Times journalist Carlotta Gall spent more than a decade reporting from Afghanistan and Pakistan after 9/11. Her book, The Wrong Enemy, offers new information about how Islamabad has helped the Taliban in Afghanistan, and how Pakistan’s intelligence agency may have helped Osama bin Laden hide out in Abbottabad, Pakistan:


"We knew [bin Laden] was hiding almost in plain sight in Pakistan, but when I finally learned this from an inside source – so, someone who really did know — it made sense that they were hiding him and protecting him to use him, I think, for their own reasons.
I think one of the reasons was that they knew he was a powerful figurehead of al-Qaida [and] of Muslim fighters around the world, and I think they wanted him on their side, a bit controlled, to use him for their own policy-making. And so they used him to control and influence their own militant proxy forces that Pakistan has been fostering and sponsoring for several decades now … [including] to fight in Kashmir …
I think also they didn’t want to be the nation that handed him over to the U.S., to be seen by other Muslims as the ones who betrayed this hero or Muslim warrior, as he’s often seen …
They were always telling the west that the trail had gone cold. [Pakistani] President [Pervez] Musharraf came to Washington and said that: We have no information, maybe bin Laden is dead. There was a failure not only to cooperate with the U.S., who was supposed to be the great ally and has pumped money and assistance into Pakistan for this last decade or more, but there was actually genuinely an effort to mislead and to hide him when they knew that this was the one great target for America after Sept. 11.”



Photo : Osama bin Laden’s hideout in Abottabad, Pakistan via Getty Images

    New York Times journalist Carlotta Gall spent more than a decade reporting from Afghanistan and Pakistan after 9/11. Her book, The Wrong Enemy, offers new information about how Islamabad has helped the Taliban in Afghanistan, and how Pakistan’s intelligence agency may have helped Osama bin Laden hide out in Abbottabad, Pakistan:

    "We knew [bin Laden] was hiding almost in plain sight in Pakistan, but when I finally learned this from an inside source – so, someone who really did know — it made sense that they were hiding him and protecting him to use him, I think, for their own reasons.

    I think one of the reasons was that they knew he was a powerful figurehead of al-Qaida [and] of Muslim fighters around the world, and I think they wanted him on their side, a bit controlled, to use him for their own policy-making. And so they used him to control and influence their own militant proxy forces that Pakistan has been fostering and sponsoring for several decades now … [including] to fight in Kashmir …

    I think also they didn’t want to be the nation that handed him over to the U.S., to be seen by other Muslims as the ones who betrayed this hero or Muslim warrior, as he’s often seen …

    They were always telling the west that the trail had gone cold. [Pakistani] President [Pervez] Musharraf came to Washington and said that: We have no information, maybe bin Laden is dead. There was a failure not only to cooperate with the U.S., who was supposed to be the great ally and has pumped money and assistance into Pakistan for this last decade or more, but there was actually genuinely an effort to mislead and to hide him when they knew that this was the one great target for America after Sept. 11.”

    Photo : Osama bin Laden’s hideout in Abottabad, Pakistan via Getty Images

  2. osama bin laden

    terrorism

    afghanistan

    pakistan

    war

    journalism

    carlotta gall

  1. L.A. Times photojournalist Mark Boster captures chilling scenes from supermax security Pelican Bay State Prison.

    Thursday on Fresh Air:

    4 alleged leaders of rival prison gangs worked together to coordinate a hunger strike last summer, at California’s Pelican Bay State Prison, in protest of long-term solitary confinement. We’ll speak to journalist Benjamin Wallace-Wells about how they organized the strike while in solitary. Then we’ll speak to Professor Craig Haney who has interviewed about 1,000 prisoners who have done time in solitary about its psychological impact.

  2. prison

    solitary confinement

    pelican bay prison

    journalism

    interview

    fresh air

    photography

  1. Fox News CEO Roger Ailes is the subject of Gabriel Sherman's new book, The Loudest Voice in the Room. In today's interview with Sherman he describes how Ailes and Fox News changed media in America: 

One of Ailes’ lasting legacies will be that for millions of Americans, news is now no longer viewed as a way to be informed about the world; it’s a way of gathering information that advances your side.
… The subtitle of my book is “Roger Ailes Divided A Country.” The resentments and the antagonisms that are surfaced on Fox have cleaved our culture. The right has Fox [News]; MSNBC counter-programmed to Fox; the Internet is now populated with all brand of sites that present news from different ideological positions. Ultimately, we’ve lost this notion that journalism should be separate from politics. … Now, politics and journalism have been fused and Roger Ailes has been at the center of that transformation.


image via LA Times Blogs

    Fox News CEO Roger Ailes is the subject of Gabriel Sherman's new book, The Loudest Voice in the Room. In today's interview with Sherman he describes how Ailes and Fox News changed media in America: 

    One of Ailes’ lasting legacies will be that for millions of Americans, news is now no longer viewed as a way to be informed about the world; it’s a way of gathering information that advances your side.

    … The subtitle of my book is “Roger Ailes Divided A Country.” The resentments and the antagonisms that are surfaced on Fox have cleaved our culture. The right has Fox [News]; MSNBC counter-programmed to Fox; the Internet is now populated with all brand of sites that present news from different ideological positions. Ultimately, we’ve lost this notion that journalism should be separate from politics. … Now, politics and journalism have been fused and Roger Ailes has been at the center of that transformation.

    image via LA Times Blogs

  2. fresh air

    interview

    fox news

    roger ailes

    journalism

    gabriel sherman

  1. New York Times environmental reporter Justin Gillis on how often he feels it’s necessary to quote climate change skeptics in his articles:

I quote the climate skeptics or deniers — whatever term you prefer — when they’re relevant. So when I’m doing a piece about the science itself and what the latest scientific findings are, especially if that’s a short piece, I don’t necessarily feel obliged to quote the climate skeptics the same way that if you were doing a story about evolution, a New York Times reporter wouldn’t feel obliged to call up a creationist and ask them what they think. On the other hand, the climate skeptics are politically relevant at this point in American history [in a way] the creationists are not, for example, so we have a fair chunk of the Congress … that sees political traction right now in questioning climate science or purporting not to believe it and so, in a political story or in a longer story, I usually do give some amount of space to the climate skeptics.

Image by Jonathan Stead/Flickr

    New York Times environmental reporter Justin Gillis on how often he feels it’s necessary to quote climate change skeptics in his articles:

    I quote the climate skeptics or deniers — whatever term you prefer — when they’re relevant. So when I’m doing a piece about the science itself and what the latest scientific findings are, especially if that’s a short piece, I don’t necessarily feel obliged to quote the climate skeptics the same way that if you were doing a story about evolution, a New York Times reporter wouldn’t feel obliged to call up a creationist and ask them what they think. On the other hand, the climate skeptics are politically relevant at this point in American history [in a way] the creationists are not, for example, so we have a fair chunk of the Congress … that sees political traction right now in questioning climate science or purporting not to believe it and so, in a political story or in a longer story, I usually do give some amount of space to the climate skeptics.

    Image by Jonathan Stead/Flickr

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Justin Gillis

    environment

    climate change

    journalism

  1. Jake Tapper tells Terry Gross about whether he gets any blow-back from the White House for asking tough questions:

There’s always blow-back. … I think it’s fair to say that when you ask a question that makes the president displeased that displeasure has a way of trickling down and making itself know not only from White House officials but from the unruly masses on Twitter and Facebook and email and the President’s allies in the media. So i think it’s fair to say that yes there’s blow-back but that’s also part of the job and if you can’t handle blow-back because you asked a tough question then you shouldn’t be doing the job. … [B]ut I will say, and especially to reporters out there — or aspiring reporters: Ultimately, if the questions are good ones — and not about stupid things like birth certificates — but ultimately if the questions are good ones, about things that they know in their hearts were fair questions, if uncomfortable ones at the time, you will earn the respect of people in the White House.

Image of Jake Tapper and President Obama from the White House/Flickr

    Jake Tapper tells Terry Gross about whether he gets any blow-back from the White House for asking tough questions:

    There’s always blow-back. … I think it’s fair to say that when you ask a question that makes the president displeased that displeasure has a way of trickling down and making itself know not only from White House officials but from the unruly masses on Twitter and Facebook and email and the President’s allies in the media. So i think it’s fair to say that yes there’s blow-back but that’s also part of the job and if you can’t handle blow-back because you asked a tough question then you shouldn’t be doing the job. … [B]ut I will say, and especially to reporters out there — or aspiring reporters: Ultimately, if the questions are good ones — and not about stupid things like birth certificates — but ultimately if the questions are good ones, about things that they know in their hearts were fair questions, if uncomfortable ones at the time, you will earn the respect of people in the White House.

    Image of Jake Tapper and President Obama from the White House/Flickr

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Jake Tapper

    CNN

    ABC

    The White House

    Journalism

    Barack Obama

  1. Charlie LeDuff tells Dave Davies about his two rules for journalism:

There’s two rules to this whole game called journalism: Get it right; and don’t be boring. Because if you’re boring, you’re dead. I’ll say it this way: [The] press is written into the Constitution like the judiciary, the executive and the legislative, except they didn’t leave us any money. We have to find our own money to do it. So if people don’t want to purchase your product, you’re dead. So I like Borat; I like Jackass; I like Charles Kuralt; I like Colbert; I like 60 Minutes. I like kitty cats and YouTube. Put them all together, shake it up, and give me something — give me something smart and give me something entertaining. That’s my mantra.
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    Charlie LeDuff tells Dave Davies about his two rules for journalism:

    There’s two rules to this whole game called journalism: Get it right; and don’t be boring. Because if you’re boring, you’re dead. I’ll say it this way: [The] press is written into the Constitution like the judiciary, the executive and the legislative, except they didn’t leave us any money. We have to find our own money to do it. So if people don’t want to purchase your product, you’re dead. So I like Borat; I like Jackass; I like Charles Kuralt; I like Colbert; I like 60 Minutes. I like kitty cats and YouTube. Put them all together, shake it up, and give me something — give me something smart and give me something entertaining. That’s my mantra.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Charlie LeDuff

    Detroit: An Autopsy

    journalism

  1. There’s a bullseye on my head when I step into Somalia, wherever I am. People have been kidnapped and killed. Westerners have been taken hostage. I’m going into this area – and putting myself in danger and so is the photographer – and the paper supports us doing that because we feel that this is important, this is part of our job and we have an opportunity as journalists to make a difference.

    — Jeffrey Gettleman covers Somalia for The New York Times. On today’s Fresh Air, he explains what he’s seen and why he keeps going back.

  2. jeffrey gettleman

    somalia

    new york times

    journalism

  1. I’m on the board of the Committee to Protect Journalists and they consider Pakistan as the most dangerous place in the world for journalists. Seven journalists were killed last year. Countless others have been arrested, tortured, kidnapped, beaten, harassed, whatever. Journalism has become a very dangerous profession, from both the extremists and the authorities. That has become a big burden on affecting people’s ability to write.

    — Today on Fresh Air, Pakistani journalist Ahmed Rashid discusses the challenges facing Pakistan and Afghanistan in the post-Osama bin Laden era, as well as the complicated relationship the two countries have with the United States.

  2. ahmed rashid

    pakistan

    afghanistan

    journalism

  1. Once you’ve put yourself on record in an interview, and you’re sort of thinking fast and saying the first thing that pops into your mind, basically, anything to fill up the air time or the reporter’s time, it’s a little disconcerting, when you’re younger than I, to realize that these remarks which you toss off, once they’re in print, have an equal weight with all the words that you’ve labored to polish and make come out exactly right.

    — John Updike telling Terry Gross why he once called interviews ‘a form to be loathed.’ [complete interview here]

  2. john updike

    lit

    interview

    journalism

  1. How NPR Became A Hotbed For Female Journalists (via @thedailybeast)

    How NPR Became A Hotbed For Female Journalists (via @thedailybeast)

  2. susan stamberg

    journalism

    npr

  1. Media Diet?

    I gave a talk at my college newspaper last night about interviewing and ethics. A lot of the people at the talk had questions relating to journalism careers and social media. I sent them a list of links this morning and thought I would share them here too. Does anyone have any other ones to suggest?

    Helpful Sites:


    I use Media Gazer to keep on top of media stories (a good way to learn about job openings is to read about when people have moved on…) I also have a twitter search for ‘public media’ AND ‘jobs.’ You can substitute ‘newspaper’ or ‘magazine’ for public media, obviously. @nprjobs posts all of the npr-related jobs. Lots of people post about jobs on Twitter so follow journalists you admire and you’ll start to see some job postings.

    Atlantic Wire: Media Diet is a good resource for finding out what other journalists are reading:

    I keep Twitter keyword trackers (in Tweetdeck) and Google News Alerts for keywords associated with my show. If you have a beat, creating a keyword tracker for your beat + Philadelphia will result in many helpful tips.

    This is a cool site from the WSJ which just shows you top headlines. You can change the order (I think the WSJ is first because they made it.)

    CJR tracks media stories. A good overview of what’s going on in the biz.

    This is just a *really* nice way to display clips online.

    If you use any other sites, please let me know. Obviously, this is just a sampling to get them started. (Many were freshman and eager to get involved in journalism.)

  2. journalism

    media

  1. At least on the Web, you can amend. The ethic of the Web is to say what you know as quickly as you can, and then reiterate over and over again. The Web is kind of a self-cleaning oven, and what you have up there can grow more accurate as time goes by. That’s never true of print. It’s always there for the ages.

    — David Carr: A Media Omnivore Discusses His Diet : NPR (via thisistheverge)

  2. david carr

    media

    journalism

    i may have edited this post several times

  1. If they don’t engage, I just tell them, ‘Well, you better put the nut-cup on, because this isn’t going to be pleasant for anybody.’

    — David Carr on how he tells sources that he’s writing a serious piece

  2. david carr

    media

    journalism

  1. In March, veteran foreign correspondent Anthony Shadid and three other journalists were held and beaten by security forces in Libya. On today’s Fresh Air, Shadid talks about his experiences in Libya and why he decided to continue reporting from conflict zones. In the past year, he’s covered the Arab uprisings in Egypt, Libya, Syria, Bahrain and Tunisia. Before that, he covered the Iraq War for nearly a decade

  2. anthony shadid

    libya

    syria

    middle east

    arab spring

    journalism