1. New York Times Supreme Court correspondent Adam Liptak on the conservative nature of John Roberts’ Court:  “The Burger court and the Rehnquist court, which  sat for about 35 years, fairly consistently were ruling in a  conservative direction about 55 percent of the time. That was a very,  very sharp turn to the right from the Warren court, the famously liberal  court that preceded it, which was at 34 percent [conservative]. And the  Roberts court, which has now finished five years, now moves an  additional increment to the right. It’s now at 58 percent — I stress,  not a huge move, but a discernable move in a period where there was  nothing like this. And the term that ended last year, the court is at 65  percent conservative. So you do see by these measurements, the court is  noticeably more conservative than even the conservative courts that  preceded it.” View in High-Res

    New York Times Supreme Court correspondent Adam Liptak on the conservative nature of John Roberts’ Court: “The Burger court and the Rehnquist court, which sat for about 35 years, fairly consistently were ruling in a conservative direction about 55 percent of the time. That was a very, very sharp turn to the right from the Warren court, the famously liberal court that preceded it, which was at 34 percent [conservative]. And the Roberts court, which has now finished five years, now moves an additional increment to the right. It’s now at 58 percent — I stress, not a huge move, but a discernable move in a period where there was nothing like this. And the term that ended last year, the court is at 65 percent conservative. So you do see by these measurements, the court is noticeably more conservative than even the conservative courts that preceded it.”

  2. supreme court

    adam liptak

    new york times

    npr

    fresh air

    john roberts

  1. Tomorrow: We talk about the Roberts court with New York Times Supreme Court correspondent Adam Liptak. He’s recently written about how the Roberts court has become the most conservative one in living memory, and that several of the court’s written decisions have been unusually long, but lacking in clarity. View in High-Res

    Tomorrow: We talk about the Roberts court with New York Times Supreme Court correspondent Adam Liptak. He’s recently written about how the Roberts court has become the most conservative one in living memory, and that several of the court’s written decisions have been unusually long, but lacking in clarity.

  2. supreme court

    adam liptak

    john roberts