1. Today on Fresh Air  Graham Nash explains how having Neil Young join Crosby, Stills & Nash made the sound darker and more intense:


It’s more difficult to sing 4 part [harmonies], you’ve got to start shifting parts around and stuff. Neil [Young] brings a darker edge to our music, and I don’t mean that in a negative way… it’s more intense. That first album of Crosby, Stills & Nash is kind of summery, lots of palm trees in it feeling, a cool breeze through the canyons kind of music.
Actually, Jimi Hendrix when asked what he thought of Crosby, Stills & Nash [he] looked at the interviewer and said, ‘That’s Western sky music.’ And I thought, ‘Wow. That’s brilliant.’ The point is that Neil brings a different kind of musical intensity to the band, and the music of Crosby, Stills & Nash and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young is very, very different.  



Hear the full interview, read more interview highlights or read the first chapter of Nash’s memoir “Wild Tales” here 


image of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young in 1973 via SoundColorVibration View in High-Res

    Today on Fresh Air  Graham Nash explains how having Neil Young join Crosby, Stills & Nash made the sound darker and more intense:

    It’s more difficult to sing 4 part [harmonies], you’ve got to start shifting parts around and stuff. Neil [Young] brings a darker edge to our music, and I don’t mean that in a negative way… it’s more intense. That first album of Crosby, Stills & Nash is kind of summery, lots of palm trees in it feeling, a cool breeze through the canyons kind of music.

    Actually, Jimi Hendrix when asked what he thought of Crosby, Stills & Nash [he] looked at the interviewer and said, ‘That’s Western sky music.’ And I thought, ‘Wow. That’s brilliant.’ The point is that Neil brings a different kind of musical intensity to the band, and the music of Crosby, Stills & Nash and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young is very, very different.  

    Hear the full interview, read more interview highlights or read the first chapter of Nash’s memoir “Wild Tales” here

    image of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young in 1973 via SoundColorVibration

  2. fresh air

    interview

    graham nash

    crosby stills and nash

    neil young

    1970s

    jimi hendrix

  1. Heads up, you guys: new Jimi Hendrix is being released March 5 and NPR Music has a First Listen:

    [T]he newest collection of Hendrixiana (titled People, Hell and Angels, out March 5) is a suitable addition to the guitar giant’s large posthumous output, drawn from recordings he’d made between 1968 and 1970 with a variety of co-conspirators.

  2. NPR Music

    Jimi Hendrix

    First Listen

    People Hell and Angels

  1. Guitarist and composer Marc Ribot, on Jimi Hendrix: "Like all of the other pimply adolescents in the late ’60s, I listened to and loved Jimi  Hendrix. And, of course, he was an amazing virtuoso on the guitar. But  what seemed to me, when I later thought about him, the most important  thing about Hendrix, was that he was a poet in terms of what he said and  what he played. And that’s something that all of the many guitarists  who are directly working in the Hendrix tradition, what so few of them  seem to get — that it seemed to be something that surrounded the music  that made it be great. I never felt like I could approach Hendrix  directly, and so … I approached him very indirectly." View in High-Res

    Guitarist and composer Marc Ribot, on Jimi Hendrix: "Like all of the other pimply adolescents in the late ’60s, I listened to and loved Jimi Hendrix. And, of course, he was an amazing virtuoso on the guitar. But what seemed to me, when I later thought about him, the most important thing about Hendrix, was that he was a poet in terms of what he said and what he played. And that’s something that all of the many guitarists who are directly working in the Hendrix tradition, what so few of them seem to get — that it seemed to be something that surrounded the music that made it be great. I never felt like I could approach Hendrix directly, and so … I approached him very indirectly."

  2. marc ribot

    jimi hendrix

    guitar

    composer

    npr

  1. One afternoon in the mid-’60s, I was on MacDougal   Street in Greenwich  Village and heard some music coming out of the Gaslight Club. I stuck my  head in to see a band doing a sound check and recognized John Hammond  and his black backup band, all wearing suits. The guitarist played his  instrument upside-down, but it was too loud for me. Besides, they  weren’t open yet, and someone chased me away. That was the one time I  saw Jimi Hendrix. View in High-Res

    One afternoon in the mid-’60s, I was on MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village and heard some music coming out of the Gaslight Club. I stuck my head in to see a band doing a sound check and recognized John Hammond and his black backup band, all wearing suits. The guitarist played his instrument upside-down, but it was too loud for me. Besides, they weren’t open yet, and someone chased me away. That was the one time I saw Jimi Hendrix.

  2. jimi hendrix

    ed ward

    npr

    fresh air