1. [The young black males are] shuttled into prisons, branded as criminals and felons, and then when they’re released, they’re relegated to a permanent second-class status, stripped of the very rights supposedly won in the civil rights movement — like the right to vote, the right to serve on juries, the right to be free of legal discrimination and employment, and access to education and public benefits. Many of the old forms of discrimination that we supposedly left behind during the Jim Crow era are suddenly legal again, once you’ve been branded a felon.

    — In her book The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, legal scholar Michelle Alexander writes that many of the gains of the civil rights movement have been undermined by the mass incarceration of black Americans in the war on drugs.

  2. jim crow

    michelle alexander

    race

    politics

    prison

  1. Tomorrow: the role of the Supreme Court in suppressing civil rights. We talk to Lawrence Goldstone. His book, Inherently Unequal, takes a look at the push for equality for black Americans — and the push back — both during and after Abraham Lincoln’s presidency.
U.S. Supreme Court building, Washington, D.C. (LOC) (by The Library of Congress) View in High-Res

    Tomorrow: the role of the Supreme Court in suppressing civil rights. We talk to Lawrence Goldstone. His book, Inherently Unequal, takes a look at the push for equality for black Americans — and the push back — both during and after Abraham Lincoln’s presidency.

    U.S. Supreme Court building, Washington, D.C. (LOC) (by The Library of Congress)

  2. supreme court

    reconstruction

    jim crow

    inherently unequal

    14th amendment

  1. Isabel Wilkerson, on the Jim Crow laws that contributed to the mass exodus of African-Americans from the South during the 20th century: “There were colored and white waiting rooms everywhere, from doctors  offices to the bus stations … But there were actually colored windows  at the post office in Pensacola, Fla. And there were white and colored  telephone booths in Oklahoma. There were separate windows were white  people and black people would go to get their license plates in  Mississippi. And there were even separate tellers to make your deposits  at the First National Bank in Atlanta. It was illegal for black people  and white people to play checkers together in Birmingham. And there were  even black and white bibles to swear to tell the truth on in many parts  of the South.” (Photo:National Archives/Getty Images) View in High-Res

    Isabel Wilkerson, on the Jim Crow laws that contributed to the mass exodus of African-Americans from the South during the 20th century: “There were colored and white waiting rooms everywhere, from doctors offices to the bus stations … But there were actually colored windows at the post office in Pensacola, Fla. And there were white and colored telephone booths in Oklahoma. There were separate windows were white people and black people would go to get their license plates in Mississippi. And there were even separate tellers to make your deposits at the First National Bank in Atlanta. It was illegal for black people and white people to play checkers together in Birmingham. And there were even black and white bibles to swear to tell the truth on in many parts of the South.” (Photo:National Archives/Getty Images)

  2. isabel wilkerson

    great migration

    jim crow

    fresh air

    terry gross

    npr