1. These teacup balconies in Japan are just delightful. 

via kingtomofstyle

    These teacup balconies in Japan are just delightful.

    via kingtomofstyle

  2. teacup

    balcony

    japan

  1. Some of the workers we spoke to were just horrified when they realized what they were going to have to do. They were going to have to release radiation into the atmosphere. This is like the number one rule of running a nuclear power plant: you don’t do that. But the alternative was much, much worse: the alternative [was] a nuclear reactor potentially exploding, showering nuclear fuel over the area, which would be much, much worse.

    — One year later: interviewing the workers who stayed behind at the Fukushima nuclear power plant.

  2. japan

    fukushima

    dan edge

    frontline

  1. One Year Later, Inside Japan’s Nuclear Meltdown View in High-Res

    One Year Later, Inside Japan’s Nuclear Meltdown

  2. fukushima

    japan

    pbs

    frontline

    dan edge

  1. But in this case, God could have prevented that tsunami and the destruction, but he didn’t. He just took his hand off and allowed these natural forces to work. And one of the background pieces of information is Japan is under control of the sun goddess.

    — C. Peter Wagner, on the tsunami and nuclear meltdown in Japan being connected to the Emperor of Japan having sex with the sun goddess [complete interview here]

  2. c. peter wagner

    new apostolic reformation

    japan

    tsunami

  1. Posted on 14 April, 2011

    1,743 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from lookhigh

    lookhigh:

When the worst earthquake in Japan’s history and the subsequent tsunami knocked out all power in the city of Ishinomaki in Miyagi Prefecture, editors at the Ishinomaki Hibi Shimbun, the city’s daily newspaper, printed news of the disaster the only way they could: by pen and paper.
Newseum Acquires Hand-Written Newspapers Chronicling Japan Earthquake : NPR

    lookhigh:

    When the worst earthquake in Japan’s history and the subsequent tsunami knocked out all power in the city of Ishinomaki in Miyagi Prefecture, editors at the Ishinomaki Hibi Shimbun, the city’s daily newspaper, printed news of the disaster the only way they could: by pen and paper.

    Newseum Acquires Hand-Written Newspapers Chronicling Japan Earthquake : NPR

  2. media

    news

    newspaper

    handwriting

    japan

    earthquake

  1. New York Times energy reporter Matt Wald talks about the history — and future — of nuclear energy in the U.S. He says regulators in the U.S. are closely watching the situation in Japan: "If we’re lucky, we’re heading for a situation like Three Mile Island, in which you have a very long cleanup period in which you can remove the damaged fuel from the spent fuel pools and then, essentially, you got a reactor that can be decommissioned in the normal way. If we’re not lucky, you end up in a Chernobyl-type situation where you can’t get the damaged material out and you build some type of sarcophagus and then you sit there and you watch it for the next few centuries." View in High-Res

    New York Times energy reporter Matt Wald talks about the history — and future — of nuclear energy in the U.S. He says regulators in the U.S. are closely watching the situation in Japan: "If we’re lucky, we’re heading for a situation like Three Mile Island, in which you have a very long cleanup period in which you can remove the damaged fuel from the spent fuel pools and then, essentially, you got a reactor that can be decommissioned in the normal way. If we’re not lucky, you end up in a Chernobyl-type situation where you can’t get the damaged material out and you build some type of sarcophagus and then you sit there and you watch it for the next few centuries."

  2. japan

    nuclear

    matt wald

    new york times

    energy

    science

  1. Posted on 30 March, 2011

    1,209 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from latimes

    lookhigh:


latimes:

“Some question why scarce resources should be devoted to saving animals when gas shortages are endemic and human beings have so many needs,” Mark Magnier reports from Miyako, Japan. ”Their response: The welfare of animals and people are often integrally linked.”
Photo: A volunteer rescue worker rescued this small brown dog in the debris fields of Natori, Japan. A loose network of groups is working to assist animals stressed by the ordeal and, in some cases, separated from their owners. Credit: Brian van der Brug, Los Angeles Times

View in High-Res

    lookhigh:

    latimes:

    “Some question why scarce resources should be devoted to saving animals when gas shortages are endemic and human beings have so many needs,” Mark Magnier reports from Miyako, Japan. ”Their response: The welfare of animals and people are often integrally linked.”

    Photo: A volunteer rescue worker rescued this small brown dog in the debris fields of Natori, Japan. A loose network of groups is working to assist animals stressed by the ordeal and, in some cases, separated from their owners. Credit: Brian van der Brug, Los Angeles Times

    (Source: Los Angeles Times)

  2. dogs

    pets

    japan

    latimes

  1. Posted on 21 March, 2011

    1,119 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from newyorker

    newyorker:

In this week’s issue: Evan Osnos on the earthquake in Japan. James Surowiecki on disaster economics. Ben McGrath on Barry Bonds. Alexandra Jacobs on Spanx. Malcolm Gladwell on Helena Rubinstein. Peter Schjeldahl on “Bye Bye Kitty!!!”

Cover by Christoph Niemann View in High-Res

    newyorker:

    In this week’s issue: Evan Osnos on the earthquake in Japan. James Surowiecki on disaster economics. Ben McGrath on Barry Bonds. Alexandra Jacobs on Spanx. Malcolm Gladwell on Helena Rubinstein. Peter Schjeldahl on “Bye Bye Kitty!!!”

    Cover by Christoph Niemann

  2. christoph niemann

    the new yorker

    japan

  1. Posted on 17 March, 2011

    122 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from lookhigh

    lookhigh:

NationalJournal.com - Japan Earthquake: The Struggle to Recover

A woman walks away from a message wall after writing a message to the victims of last week’s earthquake and tsunami in Japan in central Seoul, South Korea, on March 16, 2011. (REUTERS/Truth Leem)

More riveting pictures from Alan Taylor’s photo blog at The Atlantic
View in High-Res

    lookhigh:

    NationalJournal.com - Japan Earthquake: The Struggle to Recover

    A woman walks away from a message wall after writing a message to the victims of last week’s earthquake and tsunami in Japan in central Seoul, South Korea, on March 16, 2011. (REUTERS/Truth Leem)

    More riveting pictures from Alan Taylor’s photo blog at The Atlantic

  2. photography

    japan

  1. Efforts to get cooling water onto volatile nuclear material by air and ground at Japan’s Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant were unsuccessful Thursday. A second priority is trying to restore power at the plant, where reactor cooling systems were disrupted by Friday’s earthquake and tsunami. View in High-Res

    Efforts to get cooling water onto volatile nuclear material by air and ground at Japan’s Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant were unsuccessful Thursday. A second priority is trying to restore power at the plant, where reactor cooling systems were disrupted by Friday’s earthquake and tsunami.

  2. japan

    nuclear

  1. Posted on 15 March, 2011

    627 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from lookhigh

    lookhigh:

Interactive: A Visual Guide Inside Japan’s Reactors : NPR
View in High-Res

    lookhigh:

    Interactive: A Visual Guide Inside Japan’s Reactors : NPR

  2. japan

    nuclear

    reactors

  1. Posted on 15 March, 2011

    551 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from lookhigh

    lookhigh:

Live Blog: News On The Disaster In Japan : NPR

The latest on what’s going on in Japan. View in High-Res

    lookhigh:

    Live Blog: News On The Disaster In Japan : NPR

    The latest on what’s going on in Japan.

  2. japan

  1. pureaesthetic:

photog: shibuya crossing goes dark to maintain power reserves. taken by tokyo resident brian scott peterson.
View in High-Res

    pureaesthetic:

    photog: shibuya crossing goes dark to maintain power reserves. taken by tokyo resident brian scott peterson.

  2. japan

    tokyo

    shibuya crossing

  1. The latest on the nuclear blast in Japan View in High-Res

    The latest on the nuclear blast in Japan

  2. japan

    tsunami

    earthquake

    fukushima

    nuclear crisis