1. Fresh Air’s classical music reviewer Lloyd Schwartz writes about conductor James Levine's “triumphant comeback,” when he took the stage at Carnegie Hall with the MET Opera Orchestra:

An extended ovation greeted conductor James Levine last May when he returned to performing after a two-year absence. In 2011, he resigned as music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and cancelled his performances at the Metropolitan Opera. He’d been plagued by health problems, injuries and operations, and it was painful for him to move. Many of his admirers, even he himself, feared he might never conduct again.
But last year, the Met announced that he’d be returning this year to lead three opera productions and several concerts with the Met Orchestra at Carnegie Hall. A special wheelchair had been rigged for him, and although he wasn’t walking, he was evidently pain free and his upper body was strong and flexible. We can hear his exciting return on Live at Carnegie Hall, a new two-CD set of that first Carnegie Hall concert, leading orchestral staples by Wagner, Beethoven and Schubert.




image via New Criterion, by Steve Sherman View in High-Res

    Fresh Air’s classical music reviewer Lloyd Schwartz writes about conductor James Levine's “triumphant comeback,” when he took the stage at Carnegie Hall with the MET Opera Orchestra:

    An extended ovation greeted conductor James Levine last May when he returned to performing after a two-year absence. In 2011, he resigned as music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and cancelled his performances at the Metropolitan Opera. He’d been plagued by health problems, injuries and operations, and it was painful for him to move. Many of his admirers, even he himself, feared he might never conduct again.

    But last year, the Met announced that he’d be returning this year to lead three opera productions and several concerts with the Met Orchestra at Carnegie Hall. A special wheelchair had been rigged for him, and although he wasn’t walking, he was evidently pain free and his upper body was strong and flexible. We can hear his exciting return on Live at Carnegie Hall, a new two-CD set of that first Carnegie Hall concert, leading orchestral staples by Wagner, Beethoven and Schubert.

    image via New Criterion, by Steve Sherman

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  1. Audio is now available for Terry’s interview with James Levine. Enjoy!

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  1. When the performance comes, the orchestra has to be empowered to function within this conception without having to check with the middle man. It’s not possible to feel and play and respond to what you feel inside and keep looking to have a constant alignment with the gesture of the conductor.

    — James Levine on his methods of conducting

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  1. Conductor James Levine on wildly gesticulating conductors: "If your orientation is to watch the conductor, you get your aural sense interfered with in a way that is not completely controllable and conscious — because you see the conductor gesturing in a way that shows something about his feeling about the passage. And this, unconsciously, you measure against what you hear. And I think the most satisfying pieces that I hear live are usually conducted by conductors who have a very clear-cut idea of what their function is at a rehearsal and what their function is at a concert." View in High-Res

    Conductor James Levine on wildly gesticulating conductors"If your orientation is to watch the conductor, you get your aural sense interfered with in a way that is not completely controllable and conscious — because you see the conductor gesturing in a way that shows something about his feeling about the passage. And this, unconsciously, you measure against what you hear. And I think the most satisfying pieces that I hear live are usually conducted by conductors who have a very clear-cut idea of what their function is at a rehearsal and what their function is at a concert."

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  1. Dies Irae - Verdi

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  1. Posted on 3 May, 2011

    23 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from boston

    boston:

Levine  stepping down as BSO music director
- Boston Symphony Orchestra music director James Levine, whose tenure was marked by artistic highs but long absences due to his health problems, will step down from his post at the end of orchestra’s summer season in Tanglewood, the BSO has announced.

Tomorrow: James Levine View in High-Res

    boston:

    Levine stepping down as BSO music director

    - Boston Symphony Orchestra music director James Levine, whose tenure was marked by artistic highs but long absences due to his health problems, will step down from his post at the end of orchestra’s summer season in Tanglewood, the BSO has announced.

    Tomorrow: James Levine

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  1. fyeahoperasingers:

    Soprano Kathleen Battle sings ‘Je veux vivre dans’ from Gounod’s ‘Romeo et Juliette.’  1988, and that’s James Levine conducting.

    Say what you want about her attitude (or what she’s wearing), but you can’t deny that she can sing.

    Tomorrow: conductor James Levine

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  1. Celebrating James Levine’s 40 Years at The Met View in High-Res

    Celebrating James Levine’s 40 Years at The Met

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