1. Fresh Air critic at large John Powers reviews Redeployment by Phil Klay, a short story collection that “addresses the gap between the American soldiers who’ve fought in Iraq and those of us back home:”

Klay makes you feel the physical and psychic cost demanded of our soldiers in Iraq. And he may be even better on what it means to return to an America that pays gaudy lip service to honoring the troops yet doesn’t try to understand their service. Because we have a volunteer army, our soldiers and vets remain weirdly invisible to their fellow countrymen.
View in High-Res

    Fresh Air critic at large John Powers reviews Redeployment by Phil Klay, a short story collection that “addresses the gap between the American soldiers who’ve fought in Iraq and those of us back home:”

    Klay makes you feel the physical and psychic cost demanded of our soldiers in Iraq. And he may be even better on what it means to return to an America that pays gaudy lip service to honoring the troops yet doesn’t try to understand their service. Because we have a volunteer army, our soldiers and vets remain weirdly invisible to their fellow countrymen.

  2. war

    soldiers

    veterans

    iraq

    book

    john powers

  1. I think there’s always a feeling among soldiers that what you bring home with you and what happened overseas may be something only you or your group will understand, and that any attempt to bring it to a larger audience or to tell the story of it is, in effect, a cheapening of it and a way of selling it rather than sharing it.

    — Jake Siegel who served in both Iraq and Afghanistan speaks to Fresh Air about the difficulty of writing about and sharing his experiences at war.

  2. fresh air

    iraq

    afgahnistan

    war

    veterans

  1. This is the Middle East, you think you know something and it just spins off into infinity, or it just dissolves into the shadows. So what you think you knew is suddenly something else a few seconds later.

    — 

    Dexter Filkins, reporter for The New Yorker is on the show today

    Filkins is an expert of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and he explains to Terry Gross that even he gets confused by the “always-turning” stories behind the wars and political operations.

    Today he talks about Iran's involvement in Syria, especially the Quds Force led by Qassem Suleimani.

  2. fresh air

    interview

    Dexter Filkins

    The New Yorker

    iran

    iraq

    Afghanistan

    syria

  1. The stakes were all too low suddenly. Whether I did the dishes or not didn’t seem to rise to the challenge of what I had done before. When nothing is important anymore, everything is important. Little things start to become too important and you start to become obsessive over the details. And that obsessive part of my brain that kept me alive in Iraq went into overdrive and it became the hindrance. It got in the way.

    — Brian Castner tells Terry Gross about transitioning to home life after three tours of duty in Iraq in which he disabled roadside IEDs.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Brian Castner

    Iraq

    The Long Walk

  1. Veteran and poet Brian Turner talks about a poem he wrote about being shot at:

It (the bullet) was coming toward me. That poem has a lot of bravado to it, and I think that’s just the fear masking itself.  About eighty percent of that poem is fear, and twenty percent is an ugly psychology of finally wanting to meet that moment, because so often, as an infantry soldier what I actually experienced wasn’t direct combat, it was indirect attacks against us, roadside bombs, snipers, mortar attacks, those types of things.

Image by Lorianne DiSabato via Flickr

    Veteran and poet Brian Turner talks about a poem he wrote about being shot at:

    It (the bullet) was coming toward me. That poem has a lot of bravado to it, and I think that’s just the fear masking itself.  About eighty percent of that poem is fear, and twenty percent is an ugly psychology of finally wanting to meet that moment, because so often, as an infantry soldier what I actually experienced wasn’t direct combat, it was indirect attacks against us, roadside bombs, snipers, mortar attacks, those types of things.

    Image by Lorianne DiSabato via Flickr

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Brian Turner

    Iraq

    Poetry

    Memorial Day

    Lorianne DiSabato

  1. Chris Hayes tells Terry Gross about how the last decade affected his politics:

My disposition as a human being is kind of a go-along-to-get-along person. I tend to trust authority. I tend to think people in charge broadly know what they’re doing, don’t lie to you, aren’t going start wars for no reason and, you know watching Iraq happen and then watching the financial crisis happen and then Katrina in the middle of that, you know, you turn around and, you think, ‘Wait a second: No one is on top of anything. Who the heck is in charge here? These people who say that they know what they’re doing don’t know what they’re doing. I’m not going to trust them the next time they tell me they know what they’re doing.’ It’s a radically unmooring feeling to recognize that people that you just figured kind of had it under control don’t have it under control and might be totally incompetent or completely corrupt or totally self-dealing.

Image of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina by greenmanowar

    Chris Hayes tells Terry Gross about how the last decade affected his politics:

    My disposition as a human being is kind of a go-along-to-get-along person. I tend to trust authority. I tend to think people in charge broadly know what they’re doing, don’t lie to you, aren’t going start wars for no reason and, you know watching Iraq happen and then watching the financial crisis happen and then Katrina in the middle of that, you know, you turn around and, you think, ‘Wait a second: No one is on top of anything. Who the heck is in charge here? These people who say that they know what they’re doing don’t know what they’re doing. I’m not going to trust them the next time they tell me they know what they’re doing.’ It’s a radically unmooring feeling to recognize that people that you just figured kind of had it under control don’t have it under control and might be totally incompetent or completely corrupt or totally self-dealing.

    Image of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina by greenmanowar

  2. chris+hayes

    Interviews

    Fresh Air

    Hurricane Katrina

    New Orleans

    Iraq

    politics

    MSNBC

  1. Posted on 19 March, 2013

    354 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from timelightbox

    It’s the 10th anniversary of the Iraq War. These photographs from Time —  with accompanying stories and context from the photojournalists who took them — create a larger picture of that decade.
To mark the occasion on the show today, Terry talks with journalist Aaron Glantz who has a series of articles out with the Center for Investigative Reporting about how the government is failing veterans.
timelightbox:

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev—NOOR for TIME
A decade has passed since the United States invaded Iraq. To mark the anniversary, we asked 55 photographers to share their images made in Iraq that moved them the most.
View in High-Res

    It’s the 10th anniversary of the Iraq War. These photographs from Time with accompanying stories and context from the photojournalists who took them — create a larger picture of that decade.

    To mark the occasion on the show today, Terry talks with journalist Aaron Glantz who has a series of articles out with the Center for Investigative Reporting about how the government is failing veterans.

    timelightbox:

    Photo by Yuri Kozyrev—NOOR for TIME

    A decade has passed since the United States invaded Iraq. To mark the anniversary, we asked 55 photographers to share their images made in Iraq that moved them the most.

  2. Time LightBox

    Iraq

    Anniversaries

    Aaron Glantz

    Center for Investigative Reporting

  1. Posted on 9 July, 2012

    540 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from combatkarma

    combatkarma:

US Marine Lance Cpls. Matthew Scofield (left), and Jarrett Hatley, a squad automatic weapon gunner and an improvised explosive device detection dog handler, rest next to Hatley’s dog Blue after clearing compounds with Afghan National Army soldiers, Jan. 4.

Today: a member of an IED-removal squad talks about what he remembers from his time in Iraq View in High-Res

    combatkarma:

    US Marine Lance Cpls. Matthew Scofield (left), and Jarrett Hatley, a squad automatic weapon gunner and an improvised explosive device detection dog handler, rest next to Hatley’s dog Blue after clearing compounds with Afghan National Army soldiers, Jan. 4.

    Today: a member of an IED-removal squad talks about what he remembers from his time in Iraq

  2. iraq

    ied

    dog

  1. buckaroo-monroe:

An IED detection dog handler with Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment holds security with his dog Coot during a partnered patrol with the Afghan Border Police, which has established governance in the southern Garmsir district of Afghanistan through the mentorship of 3rd Bn/3rd MarReg Marines.

Today: Brian Castner, who led a team in Iraq that disabled IEDs.

    buckaroo-monroe:

    An IED detection dog handler with Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment holds security with his dog Coot during a partnered patrol with the Afghan Border Police, which has established governance in the southern Garmsir district of Afghanistan through the mentorship of 3rd Bn/3rd MarReg Marines.

    Today: Brian Castner, who led a team in Iraq that disabled IEDs.

  2. brian castner

    ied

    iraq

  1. Monday: We’re talking to Brian Castner, who commanded an explosive ordinance disposal unit in Iraq. (It was one of the most dangerous jobs in Iraq.)

    Above: a scene from The Hurt Locker. [Related: Kathryn Bigelow on Fresh Air]

  2. iraq

    brian caster

  1. thepoliticalnotebook:

This is Samar Hassan, now 12 years old. She was the screaming 5-year old girl in the striking photo taken by the late Chris Hondros, a photo that has become emblematic of the Iraq war.  She had never seen the famous photo of her, blood-spattered, the  night her parents were killed by American soldiers in Tal Afar in 2005.  She now lives in Mosul, with her older sister and her sister’s husband.  

The photograph of Samar is frozen in history, but her life moved on, across a trajectory that is emblematic of what so many Iraqis have endured. In a country whose health care system has almost no ability to treat the psychological aspects of trauma, thousands of Iraqis are left alone with their torment.

Read more at the New York Times. 
(Photo Credit: Ayman Oghanna for The New York Times)

On today’s Fresh Air, reporter Tim Arango talks about tracking down Samar Hassan View in High-Res

    thepoliticalnotebook:

    This is Samar Hassan, now 12 years old. She was the screaming 5-year old girl in the striking photo taken by the late Chris Hondros, a photo that has become emblematic of the Iraq war.  She had never seen the famous photo of her, blood-spattered, the  night her parents were killed by American soldiers in Tal Afar in 2005.  She now lives in Mosul, with her older sister and her sister’s husband.  

    The photograph of Samar is frozen in history, but her life moved on, across a trajectory that is emblematic of what so many Iraqis have endured. In a country whose health care system has almost no ability to treat the psychological aspects of trauma, thousands of Iraqis are left alone with their torment.

    Read more at the New York Times

    (Photo Credit: Ayman Oghanna for The New York Times)

    On today’s Fresh Air, reporter Tim Arango talks about tracking down Samar Hassan

  2. tim arango

    iraq

    samar hassan

  1. We have [the troops] leaving at a time when just about everybody involved in the discussion — from the American military leaders to the Iraqi military leaders — did not think it was a good idea that all the troops leave — that Iraq is not ready for that.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, we talk to New York Times Baghdad Bureau Chief Tim Arango about what happens to the country after U.S. troops leave at the end of next month. 

  2. tim arango

    iraq

    middle east

    military

  1. Tomorrow: The future of Iraq and what will happen after the troops are gone.

(by U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM))

    Tomorrow: The future of Iraq and what will happen after the troops are gone.

    (by U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM))

  2. iraq

  1. Tomorrow: We talk with Tim Arango, the Baghdad Bureau Chief for The New York Times, about the future of Iraq and what will happen when the troops are gone. View in High-Res

    Tomorrow: We talk with Tim Arango, the Baghdad Bureau Chief for The New York Times, about the future of Iraq and what will happen when the troops are gone.

  2. tim arango

    new york times

    iraq

  1. One of the things that we as a country are learning is that people who are wounded in war are wounded forever.

    — On Thursday’s Fresh Air, veteran combat reporter David Wood talks about some of the challenges that severely wounded soldiers face when they return home from Afghanistan and Iraq.

  2. david wood

    veterans

    wounded warriors

    military

    afghanistan

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    news