1. 
Erik Larson, on being affected by his subject matter: "I pride myself on having a journalistic remove. For example, after my book The Devil in the White City,  people often ask if I had nightmares [and] wasn’t I horrified by the  nature of that serial killer? And my answer was always, ‘I always wear  two hats. The one that says: this is horrific. And the other part that  says: this is great stuff.’ In this case, something very different  happened. I found myself entering a low-grade depression. There’s  something so relentless and foul about Hitler and his people, and the  way things progressed from year to year. It just got to me in the  strangest way.” View in High-Res

    Erik Larson, on being affected by his subject matter"I pride myself on having a journalistic remove. For example, after my book The Devil in the White City, people often ask if I had nightmares [and] wasn’t I horrified by the nature of that serial killer? And my answer was always, ‘I always wear two hats. The one that says: this is horrific. And the other part that says: this is great stuff.’ In this case, something very different happened. I found myself entering a low-grade depression. There’s something so relentless and foul about Hitler and his people, and the way things progressed from year to year. It just got to me in the strangest way.”

  2. in the garden of beasts

    erik larson

    hitler

    world war ii

    germany

  1. I was interested in him because I wanted to find out what was that like, to have met these people when you didn’t know how all of this would turn out? We, of course, have the power of hindsight in our arsenal, but people living in Berlin in that era didn’t. What would that have been like as this darkness fell over Germany?

    — Writer Erik Larson, on why he chose to focus on William Dodd, the U.S. Ambassador to Berlin during Hitler’s rise to power, in his latest book. Larson is on Fresh Air today.

  2. erik larson

    hitler

    germany

    nazis

    in the garden of beasts

    william dodd