1. Journalist  Benjamin Wallace-Wells  explains how 4 leaders of rival prison gangs launched a hunger strike against long-term solitary confinement.  One of the 4 leaders,Todd Ashker, has been in solitary for over 20 years. On the first day of the strike, 30,000 inmates across the state of CA participated.  The men were all in small pods in the SHU and communicated by shouting through walls and drains:


I think it took a long time. These four men who led the hunger strike — Todd Ashker, [allegedly] of the Aryan Brotherhood, had the initial idea; Sitawa Jamaa, who is allegedly from the Black Guerilla Family; and Arturo Castellanos, allegedly a senior leader of the Mexican Mafia; and Antonio Guillen, allegedly one of the three “generals” of Nuestra Familia — they were put together in basically the same space years ago, in 2006, and it took five years for them come together.

That was a long process. They were very wary around one another at first, but they are each in their own way political and both Ashker and Sitawa Jamaa in particular had been reading revolutionary texts for years. In their own way, each of them had come to see their fight as fundamentally with the system itself rather than fundamentally with each other.

They also are all about the same age. They’re now in their late 40s and early 50s and they had a ton of time in the pod and they had nothing to do but talk. So what they will say is that they first came together, they first developed some intimacy, not by talking about the abuses that they believed they were suffering and not by talking about gang politics, but by talking about their families. The kind of catalyst, after all, of that was Ashker and the other white inmate on the pod … had become a kind of revolutionary book club and they would talk about these books by shouting through the pod. The impact for Ashker was to kind of highlight that they were members of a prisoner class, that the racial divisions among them were artificial and had been coached along by the guards.


Also on the show, Professor Craig Haney shares his research on the psychological impact of long-term solitary confinement.

photo of the Pelican Bay Short Corridor (SHU) via flyingoverwalls View in High-Res

    Journalist  Benjamin Wallace-Wells  explains how 4 leaders of rival prison gangs launched a hunger strike against long-term solitary confinement.  One of the 4 leaders,Todd Ashker, has been in solitary for over 20 years. On the first day of the strike, 30,000 inmates across the state of CA participated.  The men were all in small pods in the SHU and communicated by shouting through walls and drains:

    I think it took a long time. These four men who led the hunger strike — Todd Ashker, [allegedly] of the Aryan Brotherhood, had the initial idea; Sitawa Jamaa, who is allegedly from the Black Guerilla Family; and Arturo Castellanos, allegedly a senior leader of the Mexican Mafia; and Antonio Guillen, allegedly one of the three “generals” of Nuestra Familia — they were put together in basically the same space years ago, in 2006, and it took five years for them come together.

    That was a long process. They were very wary around one another at first, but they are each in their own way political and both Ashker and Sitawa Jamaa in particular had been reading revolutionary texts for years. In their own way, each of them had come to see their fight as fundamentally with the system itself rather than fundamentally with each other.

    They also are all about the same age. They’re now in their late 40s and early 50s and they had a ton of time in the pod and they had nothing to do but talk. So what they will say is that they first came together, they first developed some intimacy, not by talking about the abuses that they believed they were suffering and not by talking about gang politics, but by talking about their families. The kind of catalyst, after all, of that was Ashker and the other white inmate on the pod … had become a kind of revolutionary book club and they would talk about these books by shouting through the pod. The impact for Ashker was to kind of highlight that they were members of a prisoner class, that the racial divisions among them were artificial and had been coached along by the guards.

    Also on the show, Professor Craig Haney shares his research on the psychological impact of long-term solitary confinement.

    photo of the Pelican Bay Short Corridor (SHU) via flyingoverwalls

  2. prison

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  1. Posted on 4 October, 2012

    449 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from yaeloss

    If You Bothered to Play “Human Rights Presidential Debate Bingo” Last Night, You Lost. Big Time.

    election:

    yaeloss:

    If they do, they will both agree on them all.

    Amnesty International released a human rights bingo card in advance of last night’s presidential debate. There were no winners. (Sorry.)

    -Mike Riggs

    For those of you who don’t play debate drinking games, something to keep in mind for next time.

    (Source: yaeloss)

  2. presidential debate

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  1. Paul Farmer, “This I Believe.”

    (Source: youtube.com)

  2. paul farmer

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