1. Writer Joshua Ferris' new novel To Rise Again at a Decent Hour is about a morbid dentist who grapples with death and atheism. In the interview Ferris explains his own religious beliefs: 

"I’m not sure that I’m entirely comfortable with being described as a non-believer only because there’s this little shadow of a doubt that I keep open. I have a character in the book describe herself as a "non-practicing atheist," and I think that’s how I would describe myself. When push comes to shove, and I’m forced to think reasonably, I affirm again and again that there is no God.
But as a rule, as I go through life, I find that can lead to a dogma that is no more welcoming to my way of thinking than the dogma of believers. So I tend to want to keep the door open an inch, which I think sounds to many people like cheating, but to me it’s simply a matter of keeping — not my options open — but my mind wide, as wide as possible, and my heart open to new possibilities.”


photo via travel ukon View in High-Res

    Writer Joshua Ferris' new novel To Rise Again at a Decent Hour is about a morbid dentist who grapples with death and atheism. In the interview Ferris explains his own religious beliefs: 

    "I’m not sure that I’m entirely comfortable with being described as a non-believer only because there’s this little shadow of a doubt that I keep open. I have a character in the book describe herself as a "non-practicing atheist," and I think that’s how I would describe myself. When push comes to shove, and I’m forced to think reasonably, I affirm again and again that there is no God.

    But as a rule, as I go through life, I find that can lead to a dogma that is no more welcoming to my way of thinking than the dogma of believers. So I tend to want to keep the door open an inch, which I think sounds to many people like cheating, but to me it’s simply a matter of keeping — not my options open — but my mind wide, as wide as possible, and my heart open to new possibilities.”

    photo via travel ukon

  2. god

    relgion

    atheism

    faith

    joshua ferris

    interview

    fresh air

  1. After years of keeping it secret, writer Barbara Ehrenreich opens up about a mystic experience she had as a teenager. It was a moment that caused her to question faith, knowledge, and God: 

"The only words I can put to it after all these years is that the world flamed into life. Everything was alive. There was a feeling of an encounter with something living, not something God-like, not something loving, not something benevolent, but something beyond any of those kinds of categories, beyond any human categories. I don’t know how many minutes this lasted in its full intensity."

Her memoir is called Living With a Wild God 
image by Kris Mukai via NYT View in High-Res

    After years of keeping it secret, writer Barbara Ehrenreich opens up about a mystic experience she had as a teenager. It was a moment that caused her to question faith, knowledge, and God: 

    "The only words I can put to it after all these years is that the world flamed into life. Everything was alive. There was a feeling of an encounter with something living, not something God-like, not something loving, not something benevolent, but something beyond any of those kinds of categories, beyond any human categories. I don’t know how many minutes this lasted in its full intensity."

    Her memoir is called Living With a Wild God 

    image by Kris Mukai via NYT

  2. barbara ehrenreich

    faith

    god

    mystical experience

  1. Posted on 13 April, 2012

    119 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nprfunfacts

    nprfunfacts:

    That according to a survey conducted by anthropologist T.M. Luhrmann.

  2. t.m. lurhmann

    god

    religion

  1. There’s this amazing prayer by a Jesuit father that says ‘Fall in love with God, stay in love with God and it will change everything.’ I don’t have this ontological commitment to this God that’s kind of out there, but I do have the sense that I’m a little more able to allow myself to experience the good and the aliveness of the world, if that makes any sense.

    — T.M. Luhrmann is an anthropology professor at Stanford University. On today’s Fresh Air, she talks about how her experiences working with the people at The Vineyard changed her own ways of looking at God.

  2. god

    religion

    t.m. luhrmann

  1. What I was fascinated by, was that when people would enter the church, they’d say, ‘I don’t know what people are talking about. God doesn’t talk to me.’ And then they would try praying in this interactive, free-form imagination-rich kind of way, and after six months, they would start to say that they recognize God’s voice the way they recognize their mom’s voice on the phone.

    — Anthropologist T.M. Luhrmann observed people who attend a Vineyard church in California. There congregants were taught to discern thoughts coming from their imagination with thoughts that were coming directly from God.

  2. t.m. luhrmann

    god

    religion

    praying

  1. These folks were invited to put out a second cup of coffee for God, they prayed to go for a walk with God, to go on a date with God, to snuggle with God, to imagine that they are sitting on a bench in the park with God’s arms are around their shoulders and they’re talking about their respective days.

    — In When God Talks Back, which is based on an anthropological study she did at The Vineyard, T.M. Luhrmann examines the personal relationships that people developed with God and explores how those relationships were cemented through the practice of prayer.

  2. t.m. luhrmann

    god

    religion

    prayer

  1. From the archives: Richard Dawkins on Fresh Air

    Part two: Francis Collins on ‘The Language of God’

  2. religion

    francis collins

    richard dawkins

    god