1. Siskel & Ebert — Taxi Driver. Split vote. Roger thought it was a great character study, Gene thought it was too lurid and violent.

    Roger Ebert wrote the first film review that Martin Scorsese ever received—for 1967’s I Call First, later renamed Who’s That Knocking at My Door.

    I had been a film critic for seven months when I saw his first film, in 1967. It was titled I Call First, later changed to Who’s That Knocking at My Door. I saw it in “the submarine”—the long, low, narrow, dark screening room knocked together out of pasteboard by the Chicago International Film Festival. I was twenty-five. The festival’s founder, Michael Kutza, was under thirty. Everything was still at the beginning. This film had a quality that sent tingles up my arms. It felt made out of my dreams and guilts. I consider him the most gifted director of his generation, and have joked that I will never stop writing film reviews until he stops making films. —Roger Ebert, an excerpt from Scorsese by Ebert

    Martin Scorsese on the passing of Roger Ebert:

    “The death of Roger Ebert is an incalculable loss for movie culture and for film criticism. And it’s a loss for me personally. Roger was always supportive, he was always right there for me when I needed it most, when it really counted – at the very beginning, when every word of encouragement was precious; and then again, when I was at the lowest ebb of my career, there he was, just as encouraging, just as warmly supportive. There was a professional distance between us, but then I could talk to him much more freely than I could to other critics. Really, Roger was my friend. It’s that simple. Few people I’ve known in my life loved or cared as much about movies. I know that’s what kept him going in those last years – his life-or-death passion for movies, and his wonderful wife, Chaz. We all knew that this moment was coming, but that doesn’t make the loss any less wrenching. I’ll miss him — my dear friend, Roger Ebert.” —Martin Scorsese, April 4, 2013

    via cinephilearchive

  2. Roger Ebert

    Gene Siskel

    Martin Scorsese

    Taxi Driver

  1. Friday’s Fresh Air features an interview conducted by Terry Gross with  Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert in front of a live audience in Chicago in  February 1996. The two critics shared scenes from some of their favorite  movies and talked about how films changed their lives.

    Friday’s Fresh Air features an interview conducted by Terry Gross with Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert in front of a live audience in Chicago in February 1996. The two critics shared scenes from some of their favorite movies and talked about how films changed their lives.

  2. gene siskel

    roger ebert

    npr

    fresh air