1. Edward Norton on Wes Anderson’s films:

"What I’ve loved about Wes from the get-go [is] — the whimsy, the incredible humor … but there’s always these moments of pathos that come in and sideswipe you. Every time I watch The Royal Tenenbaums, I’m laughing and laughing and then for whatever reason, as soon as there’s that scene where [Richie Tenenbaum] releases the falcon or the hawk over the city and they play that Velvet Underground song, I tear up every single time. … I can’t explain it.
I’ve come to think that a lot of Wes’ movies are about the same thing, which is maybe people struggling with the way that the family that you’re born into fails you or you don’t have the family that you want, so you go and create the family that you need. So many of the characters in Wes’ movies are essentially creating alternative communities that support them. I think there’s something really sweet in that idea.”

Full interview: Ed Norton On ‘Birdman,’ Wes Anderson And Why $40 Makes Him Proud View in High-Res

    Edward Norton on Wes Anderson’s films:

    "What I’ve loved about Wes from the get-go [is] — the whimsy, the incredible humor … but there’s always these moments of pathos that come in and sideswipe you. Every time I watch The Royal Tenenbaums, I’m laughing and laughing and then for whatever reason, as soon as there’s that scene where [Richie Tenenbaum] releases the falcon or the hawk over the city and they play that Velvet Underground song, I tear up every single time. … I can’t explain it.

    I’ve come to think that a lot of Wes’ movies are about the same thing, which is maybe people struggling with the way that the family that you’re born into fails you or you don’t have the family that you want, so you go and create the family that you need. So many of the characters in Wes’ movies are essentially creating alternative communities that support them. I think there’s something really sweet in that idea.”

    Full interview: Ed Norton On ‘Birdman,’ Wes Anderson And Why $40 Makes Him Proud

  2. edward norton

    wes anderson

    film

    interview

    fresh air

  1. Posted on 21 October, 2014

    6,928 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from virginalvalour

    

Carrie Brownstein by Parker Fitzgerald


Sleater-Kinney Reunites, Announces New Album
Also: Carrie and Fred Armisen on  Fresh Air  View in High-Res

    Carrie Brownstein by Parker Fitzgerald

    Sleater-Kinney Reunites, Announces New Album

    Also: Carrie and Fred Armisen on  Fresh Air 

  2. sleater-kinney

    carrie brownstein

    npr music

    fresh air

  1. Fresh Air Associate Producers Molly and Heidi at the Philadelphia Film Festival. 
(Go see Birdman!)  View in High-Res

    Fresh Air Associate Producers Molly and Heidi at the Philadelphia Film Festival. 

    (Go see Birdman!) 

  2. fresh air

    philadelphia film festival

    npr

  1. Justin Simien, director of Dear White People, joins Fresh Air to discuss his new film and what motivated him to make a satire about race relations and racial identity.  
Simien on how “white movies” are just “movies”

"[Recently] Hollywood has gotten more myopic and has to make very specific choices based on how they think the audience will respond when putting a movie through the production pipeline. It’s gotten real crazily bad, I think.


I think TV has gotten it right. Shonda Rhimes has figured it out, getting multiracial casts on television and appealing to everybody. It’s interesting because I haven’t seen that with “white movies,” which most people just call “movies.” They don’t just appeal to white people, it’s taken as given that a white cast represents everyone: A white male in a movie is an everyman type character, whereas a black man in a movie is a black character and it’s a black movie and it’s only for black people.”

'Dear White People': A Satire About Racial Identity Addressed To Everyone View in High-Res

    Justin Simien, director of Dear White People, joins Fresh Air to discuss his new film and what motivated him to make a satire about race relations and racial identity.  

    Simien on how “white movies” are just “movies”

    "[Recently] Hollywood has gotten more myopic and has to make very specific choices based on how they think the audience will respond when putting a movie through the production pipeline. It’s gotten real crazily bad, I think.

    I think TV has gotten it right. Shonda Rhimes has figured it out, getting multiracial casts on television and appealing to everybody. It’s interesting because I haven’t seen that with “white movies,” which most people just call “movies.” They don’t just appeal to white people, it’s taken as given that a white cast represents everyone: A white male in a movie is an everyman type character, whereas a black man in a movie is a black character and it’s a black movie and it’s only for black people.”

    'Dear White People': A Satire About Racial Identity Addressed To Everyone

  2. race

    racism

    film

    dear white people

    justin simien

    interview

    fresh air

  1. New York Times journalist James Risen could face prison for refusing to reveal his source for a story about a botched CIA operation intended to sabotage Iran’s nuclear weapons program.
Today he joins Fresh Air to talk about journalism, getting subpoenaed, and his new book Pay Any Price.

“You cannot conduct aggressive investigative reporting without confidential sources. Whistleblowers have to reveal things that can threaten their career or their livelihood because everything is secret and classified [and] in order to talk about almost anything important in national security or the war on terror, people have to take risks in order to tell the truth about what’s going on.
We as reporters have to be willing to provide confidentiality in order to receive that information and report on that information and tell the American people what’s really happening. If we don’t have the ability to maintain confidential sources and protect our sources, then people won’t be willing to talk to us and we won’t be able to find out what the government is doing.” 



Photo Caption: A 4000-page petition with 100,000 signatories who support New York Times reporter James Risen sits on a step ladder before being delivered to the U.S. Justice Department August 14, 2014 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) View in High-Res

    New York Times journalist James Risen could face prison for refusing to reveal his source for a story about a botched CIA operation intended to sabotage Iran’s nuclear weapons program.

    Today he joins Fresh Air to talk about journalism, getting subpoenaed, and his new book Pay Any Price.

    You cannot conduct aggressive investigative reporting without confidential sources. Whistleblowers have to reveal things that can threaten their career or their livelihood because everything is secret and classified [and] in order to talk about almost anything important in national security or the war on terror, people have to take risks in order to tell the truth about what’s going on.

    We as reporters have to be willing to provide confidentiality in order to receive that information and report on that information and tell the American people what’s really happening. If we don’t have the ability to maintain confidential sources and protect our sources, then people won’t be willing to talk to us and we won’t be able to find out what the government is doing.” 

    Photo Caption: A 4000-page petition with 100,000 signatories who support New York Times reporter James Risen sits on a step ladder before being delivered to the U.S. Justice Department August 14, 2014 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

  2. james risen

    journalism

    CIA

    fresh air

    interview

  1. Posted on 13 October, 2014

    2,094 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from npr

    Death is going to happen to you — whether you want it to or not — and you’re never going to be completely comfortable with it. But it’s an important process, and please consider facing it.

    — Mortician Caitlin Doughty on what she wants readers and listeners to take away from her work. She spoke to Fresh Air's Terry Gross about how she’s trying to reform how we think about the deaths of loved ones. 

  2. death

    caitlin doughty

    interview

    fresh air

  1. Totally Biased: Hari Kondabolu’s Columbus Day Wish

    Have you heard our interviews with Hari Kondabolu or ‘Totally Biased’ host, W. Kamau Bell

    Related: John Oliver's recent “How Is That Still A Thing" about the holiday. 

  2. columbus day

    hari kondabolu

    w. kamau bell

    comedy

    race

    totally biased

    fresh air

  1. David Edelstein reviews Whiplash: 

"Whiplash charts the education—and torture—of ambitious young drummer Andrew Neiman, played by Miles Teller. The inflicter of pain is a teacher, Terence Fletcher, played by J.K. Simmons; Fletcher conducts the elite jazz band at the Manhattan conservatory where Andrew is a student. Film has a long dishonor role of sadistic authority figures, but few of them get as much of a charge as Fletcher out of messing with pupil’s heads, even driving them from the school in tears. Writer-director Damien Chazelle, has you wondering two things at once. Will Andrew succeed in wowing this most exacting of all judges? And, more important: What can be gained by doing so when the teacher is manifestly psychotic? 


There’s also a larger question: Does the director finally vindicate Fletcher’s methods, suggesting that only a harsh taskmaster can spur an artist like Andrew to the next level?


Before I try to answer, let me say I love this movie. The title is dead on. Whiplash twists you into knots. The fear of failure is omnipresent, but so—somehow—is the jazz vibe.”

In ‘Whiplash,’ A Young Drummer Plays Till He Bleeds View in High-Res

    David Edelstein reviews Whiplash

    "Whiplash charts the education—and torture—of ambitious young drummer Andrew Neiman, played by Miles Teller. The inflicter of pain is a teacher, Terence Fletcher, played by J.K. Simmons; Fletcher conducts the elite jazz band at the Manhattan conservatory where Andrew is a student. Film has a long dishonor role of sadistic authority figures, but few of them get as much of a charge as Fletcher out of messing with pupil’s heads, even driving them from the school in tears. Writer-director Damien Chazelle, has you wondering two things at once. Will Andrew succeed in wowing this most exacting of all judges? And, more important: What can be gained by doing so when the teacher is manifestly psychotic? 

    There’s also a larger question: Does the director finally vindicate Fletcher’s methods, suggesting that only a harsh taskmaster can spur an artist like Andrew to the next level?

    Before I try to answer, let me say I love this movie. The title is dead on. Whiplash twists you into knots. The fear of failure is omnipresent, but so—somehow—is the jazz vibe.”

    In ‘Whiplash,’ A Young Drummer Plays Till He Bleeds

  2. whiplash

    drums

    movie

    review

    david edelstein

    fresh air

  1. Novelist Gary Shteyngart was a wheezing, asthmatic and fearful 7-year-old when he and his parents emigrated from the Soviet Union to Queens, New York, in 1979. (This was soon after America negotiated a trade deal with the Soviets that included allowing Jews to immigrate to Israel, Canada or the U.S.) 
The relocation meant little Shteyngart was suddenly living in the country he had been taught was the enemy. His parents, who had been prevented from practicing Judaism in the Soviet Union, sent Shteyngart to a Hebrew school in Queens, where he felt lost and despised. 

"My problem was that I didn’t know any English. So on top of not knowing any English, there was another language, Hebrew, which was even harder, that they were trying to teach me. It was too much. …
And at home we had no television so I couldn’t learn English from TV, so for the first years in Hebrew school I would sit apart from everyone at the cafeteria … and I would just have long conversations in Russian with myself … in this gigantic fur hat and fur coat, speaking in a language that nobody understood. And all the kids would run up to me and do the crazy sign and laugh and laugh and laugh, but I wouldn’t stop because that was the only language that would make me comfortable. … In speaking it, I could pretend that the people I loved were around me.”

'You Can't Be This Furry' And Other Life Lessons From Gary Shteyngart View in High-Res

    Novelist Gary Shteyngart was a wheezing, asthmatic and fearful 7-year-old when he and his parents emigrated from the Soviet Union to Queens, New York, in 1979. (This was soon after America negotiated a trade deal with the Soviets that included allowing Jews to immigrate to Israel, Canada or the U.S.) 

    The relocation meant little Shteyngart was suddenly living in the country he had been taught was the enemy. His parents, who had been prevented from practicing Judaism in the Soviet Union, sent Shteyngart to a Hebrew school in Queens, where he felt lost and despised. 

    "My problem was that I didn’t know any English. So on top of not knowing any English, there was another language, Hebrew, which was even harder, that they were trying to teach me. It was too much. …

    And at home we had no television so I couldn’t learn English from TV, so for the first years in Hebrew school I would sit apart from everyone at the cafeteria … and I would just have long conversations in Russian with myself … in this gigantic fur hat and fur coat, speaking in a language that nobody understood. And all the kids would run up to me and do the crazy sign and laugh and laugh and laugh, but I wouldn’t stop because that was the only language that would make me comfortable. … In speaking it, I could pretend that the people I loved were around me.”

    'You Can't Be This Furry' And Other Life Lessons From Gary Shteyngart

  2. memoir

    gary shteyngart

    interview

    soviet union

    hebrew

    fresh air

  1. Jake Halpern grew up in Buffalo, which happens to be a national center of debt collection agencies. He writes that more than 5,000 people in the Buffalo area work in debt collection. In his new book, Halpern takes a dive into the underworld of the debt collection industry, where having a criminal background is no barrier to entry, and may sometimes be useful. He writes of a world in which batches of old, uncollected debts may be sold again and again to collection agencies, and may end up being worked by two companies simultaneously. Jake Halpern is a contributor to The New Yorker and the New York Times Magazine, and is the author of Fame Junkies and Braving Home. His new book is called Bad Paper: Chasing Debt from Wall Street to the Underworld.  
Dave Davies asked Halpern why phone calls to people’s homes to collect debts often come from agencies other than the company they originally owed.
Hear what he says.  View in High-Res

    Jake Halpern grew up in Buffalo, which happens to be a national center of debt collection agencies. He writes that more than 5,000 people in the Buffalo area work in debt collection. In his new book, Halpern takes a dive into the underworld of the debt collection industry, where having a criminal background is no barrier to entry, and may sometimes be useful. He writes of a world in which batches of old, uncollected debts may be sold again and again to collection agencies, and may end up being worked by two companies simultaneously. Jake Halpern is a contributor to The New Yorker and the New York Times Magazine, and is the author of Fame Junkies and Braving Home. His new book is called Bad Paper: Chasing Debt from Wall Street to the Underworld.  

    Dave Davies asked Halpern why phone calls to people’s homes to collect debts often come from agencies other than the company they originally owed.

    Hear what he says. 

  2. debt

    money

    fresh air

    interview

    jake halpern

  1. If you’ve been wondering where Prince has gone, he’s re-signed with Warner Brothers Records after spending the last few years of sporadic independent releases. Now Prince has released two new albums simultaneously: Art Official Age appears under his own name, and PlectrumElectrum is the debut record of a Prince back-up band called 3rdEyeGirl, but it includes Prince’s vocals, guitar, and production style throughout. Rock critic Ken Tucker has a review of both albums.


Photo of Prince via The Guardian View in High-Res

    If you’ve been wondering where Prince has gone, he’s re-signed with Warner Brothers Records after spending the last few years of sporadic independent releases. Now Prince has released two new albums simultaneously: Art Official Age appears under his own name, and PlectrumElectrum is the debut record of a Prince back-up band called 3rdEyeGirl, but it includes Prince’s vocals, guitar, and production style throughout. Rock critic Ken Tucker has a review of both albums.

    Photo of Prince via The Guardian

  2. prince

    music

    review

    fresh air

    art official age

    plectrumelectrum

    3rdeyegirl

  1. The Language That Divides America: From Red And Blue To Percents

"[The] red-blue distinction came about as pure serendipity. During the marathon battles over the recount in the 2000 election, those just happened to be the colors the media were using for the broad swaths of states that went for Bush or Gore. But the colors instantly became a proxy for all the differences in values and lifestyle that seemed to be cleaving the country into warring tribes.
That picture really had its roots in the ’70s, when we all took to using marketing jargon like “upscale,” “yuppie” and “lifestyle” itself to map out our cultural geography, and we suddenly discovered a nation called Middle America sitting in our midst. For the right, it was an occasion to brand liberals with the consumer choices that revealed them for the poseurs they were. Liberals drove a safe but ugly car built by the socialist Swedes. They consumed Chardonnay and Brie, and they followed sports that didn’t require helmets or gasoline.” 
- Geoff Nunberg, linguist


Chart via NYT View in High-Res

    The Language That Divides America: From Red And Blue To Percents

    "[The] red-blue distinction came about as pure serendipity. During the marathon battles over the recount in the 2000 election, those just happened to be the colors the media were using for the broad swaths of states that went for Bush or Gore. But the colors instantly became a proxy for all the differences in values and lifestyle that seemed to be cleaving the country into warring tribes.

    That picture really had its roots in the ’70s, when we all took to using marketing jargon like “upscale,” “yuppie” and “lifestyle” itself to map out our cultural geography, and we suddenly discovered a nation called Middle America sitting in our midst. For the right, it was an occasion to brand liberals with the consumer choices that revealed them for the poseurs they were. Liberals drove a safe but ugly car built by the socialist Swedes. They consumed Chardonnay and Brie, and they followed sports that didn’t require helmets or gasoline.” 

    - Geoff Nunberg, linguist

    Chart via NYT

  2. politics

    language

    geoff nunberg

    fresh air

    democrats

    republicans

    election

  1. Talking about death isn’t easy, but mortician Caitlin Doughty is trying to reform how we think about the deaths of loved ones — and prepare for our own.
Her new book is Smoke Gets In Your Eyes & Other Lessons from the Crematory.
Here’s what she would like to see changed in cremation: 

"If I could see anything change it would be the level of involvement of the family in the death rituals. Because when I was working at the crematory, the most shocking thing to me wasn’t so much the decomposing bodies or the strange bodies that I saw, it really was that I was alone there. And I was sending all of these people off to their final disposition in the crematorium machine and there was no one there and it didn’t feel right because I didn’t know these people. And it was an honor and I took it very seriously.
But the time when families did come — and that’s called a “witness cremation,” which is something you can ask for at your local crematory or funeral home — when … the family was there and they sat with the body and they took the time and they pushed the button to send the body into the flames, it was an incredibly powerful experience because they took responsibility for that body. And they took responsibility for that death and for that loss to the community and that to me is the thing that we’ve lost and it’s most crucial that we get back.”

Mortician Talks Openly About Death, And Wants You To, Too
Photo: Getty/Darren McCollester  View in High-Res

    Talking about death isn’t easy, but mortician Caitlin Doughty is trying to reform how we think about the deaths of loved ones — and prepare for our own.

    Her new book is Smoke Gets In Your Eyes & Other Lessons from the Crematory.

    Here’s what she would like to see changed in cremation: 

    "If I could see anything change it would be the level of involvement of the family in the death rituals. Because when I was working at the crematory, the most shocking thing to me wasn’t so much the decomposing bodies or the strange bodies that I saw, it really was that I was alone there. And I was sending all of these people off to their final disposition in the crematorium machine and there was no one there and it didn’t feel right because I didn’t know these people. And it was an honor and I took it very seriously.

    But the time when families did come — and that’s called a “witness cremation,” which is something you can ask for at your local crematory or funeral home — when … the family was there and they sat with the body and they took the time and they pushed the button to send the body into the flames, it was an incredibly powerful experience because they took responsibility for that body. And they took responsibility for that death and for that loss to the community and that to me is the thing that we’ve lost and it’s most crucial that we get back.”

    Mortician Talks Openly About Death, And Wants You To, Too

    Photo: Getty/Darren McCollester 

  2. death

    mortality

    caitlin doughty

    fresh air

    interview

    dead

  1. Tomorrow we’re talking to Caitlin Doughty, mortician and author of Smoke Gets In Your Eyes & Other Lessons from the Crematory. She’s also got a youTube series called “Ask A Mortician.” 

  2. death

    burial

    cremation

    mortician

    caitlin doughty

    halloween

    fresh air

  1. In November, 1966, eight months before he died of cancer, John Coltrane played a concert at Temple University in Philadelphia. It was not a financial success—only 700 people showed up—and the band’s high-energy music proved too much for some listeners. That concert recording is now officially out for the first time. It got our jazz critic Kevin Whitehead thinking about what Coltrane was up to: 

"John Coltrane’s 1966 Philadelphia concert wasn’t quite as legendary as folks now claim, judging by the scant attention his biographers give it. But the double-CD “Offering: Live at Temple University” spotlights an aspect of Coltrane’s late period more heard about than heard—how his generosity of spirit led him to share his stage with lesser-known players. Drop-ins here include a gaggle of local percussionists he’d been jamming with.
Coltrane’s vocal outbursts in Philly lend credence to the idea his saxophone was an extension of his voice, just as soprano sax extended the range of his tenor. But Coltrane was fascinated by the saxophone itself, and ways to animate the mechanism. His breath liberated the saxophone’s life force. He was concerned with getting the instrument to sound, to feel as well as hear the dance of a vibrating air column inside the metal tube. Some fans had given up on Coltrane by 1966, but in a way his priorities hadn’t changed. Playing standards in the ’50s, he had that same love of setting the horn vibrating with a busy line.”

Listen: One Final Offering From John Coltrane View in High-Res

    In November, 1966, eight months before he died of cancer, John Coltrane played a concert at Temple University in Philadelphia. It was not a financial success—only 700 people showed up—and the band’s high-energy music proved too much for some listeners. That concert recording is now officially out for the first time. It got our jazz critic Kevin Whitehead thinking about what Coltrane was up to: 

    "John Coltrane’s 1966 Philadelphia concert wasn’t quite as legendary as folks now claim, judging by the scant attention his biographers give it. But the double-CD “Offering: Live at Temple University” spotlights an aspect of Coltrane’s late period more heard about than heard—how his generosity of spirit led him to share his stage with lesser-known players. Drop-ins here include a gaggle of local percussionists he’d been jamming with.

    Coltrane’s vocal outbursts in Philly lend credence to the idea his saxophone was an extension of his voice, just as soprano sax extended the range of his tenor. But Coltrane was fascinated by the saxophone itself, and ways to animate the mechanism. His breath liberated the saxophone’s life force. He was concerned with getting the instrument to sound, to feel as well as hear the dance of a vibrating air column inside the metal tube. Some fans had given up on Coltrane by 1966, but in a way his priorities hadn’t changed. Playing standards in the ’50s, he had that same love of setting the horn vibrating with a busy line.”

    Listen: One Final Offering From John Coltrane

  2. john coltrane

    jazz

    temple university

    philadelphia

    philly

    fresh air

    kevin whitehead