1. WEDNESDAY: Country music singer Marty Stuart brings his guitar to the studio to play songs of sin and redemption  from his new album Saturday Night/Sunday Morning. And he’s got some stories about playing in the bands of Lester Flat and Johnny Cash.
Stuart also has the largest private collection of country music artifacts, including boots owned by Patsy Cline, Johnny Cash, and Hank Williams. 

Photo via American Songwriter View in High-Res

    WEDNESDAY: Country music singer Marty Stuart brings his guitar to the studio to play songs of sin and redemption  from his new album Saturday Night/Sunday Morning. And he’s got some stories about playing in the bands of Lester Flat and Johnny Cash.

    Stuart also has the largest private collection of country music artifacts, including boots owned by Patsy Cline, Johnny Cash, and Hank Williams. 

    Photo via American Songwriter

  2. country music

    marty stuart

    johnny cash

    interview

    fresh air

  1. Speaking of The Grand Budapest … Listen:  Wes Anderson: ‘We Made A Pastiche’ Of Eastern Europe’s Greatest Hits
Minimalist posters of Wes Anderson houses via Buzzfeed View in High-Res

    Speaking of The Grand Budapest … Listen:  Wes Anderson: ‘We Made A Pastiche’ Of Eastern Europe’s Greatest Hits

    Minimalist posters of Wes Anderson houses via Buzzfeed

  2. wes anderson

    grand budapest hotel

    minimalist poster

    fresh air

    interview

  1. Tuesday afternoon slump calls for some Mike Birbiglia

    Much better. 

  2. mike birbiglia

    sleepwalk with me

    ira glass

    fresh air

    interview

    comedy

    gif

  1. Today we talk to Matt Bai, author of All the Truth Is Out: The Week Politics Went Tabloid.  The book centers on Gary Hart’s 1987 sex scandal that destroyed his political ambitions, and how it was a turning point in how the media cover politics, emphasizing quote character issues, over political experience.  
'All The Truth Is Out' Examines How Political Journalism Went Tabloid

Dave Davies: Historically, before 1987 [and the Gary Hart sex scandal], what were the standards employed by journalists in covering politician’s private lives? 

Matt Bai: It’s too facile to say that private lives were never in issue in politics or presidential politics. You certainly can’t say that character wasn’t an issue, we always cared about these things. But by and large, if you’re looking at 20th century politics, let’s say, and even going back before then, the personal lives or private or marital transgressions of national candidates became germane to the debate only when they burst out into the open and affected your political standing. So if you look at someone like Nelson Rockefeller, who in the 1960s divorced his wife, married a much younger staffer, it was quite scandalous, particularly in the Republican Party—that affected his standing with republican voters, it was a political story and it was covered. Chappaquiddick, of course, we all know. Ted Kennedy’s marital troubles, his wife’s issues, all of those things were covered in the context of political standing and how it affected your campaign. 



What we didn’t have were journalists going out and playing detective or playing private investigator and trying to bring into the public arena what were considered private behaviors that were generally off-limits.  So that in the case of say a Franklin Roosevelt, a John Kennedy, a Lyndon Johnson, all of whom we now know were not angels in their private lives, by the standards most of us have for our marriages, but none of that was considered news. Even later when it was understood that John Kennedy had not only extramarital affairs but associations in terms of the mafia and a mafia mistress, that were really, I would consider quite reckless and I think most people would—most of that was treated as something separate from his presidency. He still gets very high marks as a president. 


Photo: Marilyn Monroe and JFK, via JKFlibrary.org  View in High-Res

    Today we talk to Matt Bai, author of All the Truth Is Out: The Week Politics Went Tabloid.  The book centers on Gary Hart’s 1987 sex scandal that destroyed his political ambitions, and how it was a turning point in how the media cover politics, emphasizing quote character issues, over political experience.  

    'All The Truth Is Out' Examines How Political Journalism Went Tabloid

    Dave Davies: Historically, before 1987 [and the Gary Hart sex scandal], what were the standards employed by journalists in covering politician’s private lives? 

    Matt Bai: It’s too facile to say that private lives were never in issue in politics or presidential politics. You certainly can’t say that character wasn’t an issue, we always cared about these things. But by and large, if you’re looking at 20th century politics, let’s say, and even going back before then, the personal lives or private or marital transgressions of national candidates became germane to the debate only when they burst out into the open and affected your political standing. So if you look at someone like Nelson Rockefeller, who in the 1960s divorced his wife, married a much younger staffer, it was quite scandalous, particularly in the Republican Party—that affected his standing with republican voters, it was a political story and it was covered. Chappaquiddick, of course, we all know. Ted Kennedy’s marital troubles, his wife’s issues, all of those things were covered in the context of political standing and how it affected your campaign. 

    What we didn’t have were journalists going out and playing detective or playing private investigator and trying to bring into the public arena what were considered private behaviors that were generally off-limits.  So that in the case of say a Franklin Roosevelt, a John Kennedy, a Lyndon Johnson, all of whom we now know were not angels in their private lives, by the standards most of us have for our marriages, but none of that was considered news. Even later when it was understood that John Kennedy had not only extramarital affairs but associations in terms of the mafia and a mafia mistress, that were really, I would consider quite reckless and I think most people would—most of that was treated as something separate from his presidency. He still gets very high marks as a president. 

    Photo: Marilyn Monroe and JFK, via JKFlibrary.org 

  2. history

    politics

    tabloid

    fresh air

    matt bai

    journalism

  1. TUESDAY - How American politics went tabloid.   The new book All The Truth Is Out, is about how the Gary Hart sex scandal in 1987, ended his presidential candidacy, and was a turning point in how the media cover politics, emphasizing quote character issues, over political experience.  We’ll hear form the book’s author, Matt Bai, former chief political correspondent for the New York Times Magazine. View in High-Res

    TUESDAY - How American politics went tabloid.   The new book All The Truth Is Out, is about how the Gary Hart sex scandal in 1987, ended his presidential candidacy, and was a turning point in how the media cover politics, emphasizing quote character issues, over political experience.  We’ll hear form the book’s author, Matt Bai, former chief political correspondent for the New York Times Magazine.

  2. fresh air

    interview

    tabloid

    politics

    news

  1. Lena Dunham, the creator and star of the HBO series Girls, has a new collection of personal essays called Not That Kind of Girl. She joined Fresh Air to talk about oversharing, feminism, OCD, and why she thinks most depictions of sex in movies are destructive.  

  2. lena dunham

    GIRLS

    not that kind of girl

    women

    feminism

    fresh air

    interview

  1. This true story has obviously been sweetened a bit, and while Pride has plenty of harsh notes—disappointments, rejections, rabidly homophobic antagonists, even brutality—the vibe is upbeat. It works on you, this movie. Nearly every line makes you cackle or puts a lump in your throat or both—and it’s not easy to cackle with a lump in your throat. You make a lot of weird tubercular sounds.

    — 

    David Edelstein, film critic 

    The new film Pride gathers a group of actors, among them Bill Nighy and The Wire’s Dominic West, to tell the story of a 1980’s British coal miner’s strike unexpectedly joined by a coalition of gay men and women. 

  2. pride

    movie review

    fresh air

    lgbt

  1. Anthro-zoologist John Bradshaw is the author of the books Cat Sense and Dog Sense and is an expert in animal behavior.  Fresh Air spoke to him for both books and today we’re playing bits of each interview back-to-back. Whether you’re a cat person or a dog person, Bradshaw’s got you covered.
From the Cat Sense interview:

"I think cats are much less demonstrative animals than dogs are. It’s kind of not their fault; they evolved from a solitary animal that has never had the need for a sophisticated social repertoire in the way that the dog — having evolved from the wolf — had that ready-made. So their faces are just not terribly expressive, and some people read into that, that they’re kind of cynical and aloof and those sorts of things. But I don’t believe that for a moment. I think cats show, by their behavior, even if it’s a bit more subtle than a dog’s, that they really are fond of their owners."

From the Dog Sense interview: 

"I think dogs have a right to sniff things whenever it doesn’t cause a problem to us. When I meet a dog, I hold my hand out. I don’t stick my fingers right out, just in case, but I just make a loose fist and put my hand out to the dog. If it’s a small dog, I’ll squat down. And that dog will want to come and sniff my hand and lick it if necessary. That’s a greeting, and I think if we don’t do that, I think it’s as upsetting to the dog as if we were talking to somebody that we never met before and covered our faces at that point in time, as if we were trying to disguise who we were."


Photo: Andrew Tallon via Flickr View in High-Res

    Anthro-zoologist John Bradshaw is the author of the books Cat Sense and Dog Sense and is an expert in animal behavior.  Fresh Air spoke to him for both books and today we’re playing bits of each interview back-to-back. Whether you’re a cat person or a dog person, Bradshaw’s got you covered.

    From the Cat Sense interview:

    "I think cats are much less demonstrative animals than dogs are. It’s kind of not their fault; they evolved from a solitary animal that has never had the need for a sophisticated social repertoire in the way that the dog — having evolved from the wolf — had that ready-made. So their faces are just not terribly expressive, and some people read into that, that they’re kind of cynical and aloof and those sorts of things. But I don’t believe that for a moment. I think cats show, by their behavior, even if it’s a bit more subtle than a dog’s, that they really are fond of their owners."

    From the Dog Sense interview: 

    "I think dogs have a right to sniff things whenever it doesn’t cause a problem to us. When I meet a dog, I hold my hand out. I don’t stick my fingers right out, just in case, but I just make a loose fist and put my hand out to the dog. If it’s a small dog, I’ll squat down. And that dog will want to come and sniff my hand and lick it if necessary. That’s a greeting, and I think if we don’t do that, I think it’s as upsetting to the dog as if we were talking to somebody that we never met before and covered our faces at that point in time, as if we were trying to disguise who we were."

    Photo: Andrew Tallon via Flickr

  2. cats

    dogs

    pets

    interview

    fresh air

    animal behavior

    john bradshaw

    kitten

    puppy

  1. David Bianculli reviews a new series on Amazon, Transparent, starring Jeffrey Tambor (Arrested Development).  Tambor plays Mort Pfefferman, the patriarch of a fractured family, who, at 70, decides to transition to be a woman—Maura.  

"Tambor plays this character completely straight — so to speak — without any hint of cheap humor. And it’s Tambor’s commitment to the role that makes Transparent work so well, and so quickly. When Maura, dressed in a wig and a loose-fitting blouse, explains to her support group where she is in her journey to a new sexual identity, there’s no condescension whatsoever. Not from the group — and certainly not from the way Tambor plays her.”
View in High-Res

    David Bianculli reviews a new series on Amazon, Transparent, starring Jeffrey Tambor (Arrested Development).  Tambor plays Mort Pfefferman, the patriarch of a fractured family, who, at 70, decides to transition to be a woman—Maura.  

    "Tambor plays this character completely straight — so to speak — without any hint of cheap humor. And it’s Tambor’s commitment to the role that makes Transparent work so well, and so quickly. When Maura, dressed in a wig and a loose-fitting blouse, explains to her support group where she is in her journey to a new sexual identity, there’s no condescension whatsoever. Not from the group — and certainly not from the way Tambor plays her.”

  2. fresh air

    review

    david bianculli

    trans

    transgender

    transparent

  1. Tomorrow’s show is all about the science of dog and cat behavior, so stay tuned.  View in High-Res

    Tomorrow’s show is all about the science of dog and cat behavior, so stay tuned. 

  2. cats

    dogs

    puppies

    kittens

    fresh air

  1. When we want to understand what’s happening in Iraq, Fresh Air frequently turns to Dexter Filkins. His stories are like movies that grab you and make clear all the complexities and horrors over there.  He returned to Iraq this summer to report on the Kurds. The U.S. is arming and training the Kurdish military forces, the Peshmerga (pictured), who stood up to ISIS in northern Iraq after the Iraqi soldiers retreated as ISIS approached.  But the Kurds want independence, and fortifying their military doesn’t sit well with the government in Baghdad. Filkins’ new article, The Fight Of Their Lives, is in the current issue of The New Yorker. 


Terry Gross: Why did you want to go to Kurdistan for this piece?
Dexter Filkins: [When you say] ‘Iraq,’ what do you think of? You think of chaos and car bombs and bloodshed and political strife and stalemate and everything else and when you go to Kurdistan, this small corner of Iraq, it’s nothing like that. …  Baghdad is a wreck. It looks pretty much the way it did during the war.  Then I got on a plane and I flew to Erbil, which is the capitol of Kurdistan and you feel like Dorothy. It’s amazing. There’s a Jaguar dealership in Erbil and there’s sushi restaurants and there’s dance clubs and I remember one night I had been out of town and I drove back … and I found a liquor store open and bought a six-pack of beer at 3 o’clock in the morning in the Middle East, I mean, that’s impossible anywhere for a thousand miles! It’s such a shock when you see it. You think, ‘God! I can’t believe I’m still in Iraq,’ and …  that’s really what the story is about. In a way, it’s really not part of Iraq.  Not anymore. 
Gross: They don’t want to be part of Iraq anymore. 
Filkins: Technically they’re part of Iraq but they don’t want to be and in a de-facto way, in very real way, they’re not part of Iraq, they’re pulling away. They want to make it official and I think probably … it will be independent I think sooner rather than later—though it’s hard to tell exactly when. 
Gross: So how close is ISIS now to Kurdistan? 
Filkins: It’s right on the border. It’s really weird, actually. The Erbil that I just described, you know, sushi restaurants and Jaguar dealerships and high-rises being built everywhere—30 miles away is ISIS and the 8th century. It’s weird because you can just drive, you can leave your fancy hotel, get in a car and drive to the front line in an hour and there it is. I was on a canal south of the city of Kirkuk and … and right across the canal was ISIS and you could see, they were flying their flags, they were driving around, you could see them over there manning their checkpoints, and I have to say it felt really eerie, like I was on the border of two countries. 


Photo Credit: Spencer Platt / Getty Staff
Caption: KIRKUK, IRAQ - JULY 03: Soldiers with the Kurdish peshmerga walk at an outpost on the edges of the contested city of Kirkuk on July 3, 2014 in Kirkuk, Iraq. View in High-Res

    When we want to understand what’s happening in Iraq, Fresh Air frequently turns to Dexter Filkins. His stories are like movies that grab you and make clear all the complexities and horrors over there.  He returned to Iraq this summer to report on the Kurds. The U.S. is arming and training the Kurdish military forces, the Peshmerga (pictured), who stood up to ISIS in northern Iraq after the Iraqi soldiers retreated as ISIS approached.  But the Kurds want independence, and fortifying their military doesn’t sit well with the government in Baghdad. Filkins’ new article, The Fight Of Their Lives, is in the current issue of The New Yorker

    Terry Gross: Why did you want to go to Kurdistan for this piece?

    Dexter Filkins: [When you say] ‘Iraq,’ what do you think of? You think of chaos and car bombs and bloodshed and political strife and stalemate and everything else and when you go to Kurdistan, this small corner of Iraq, it’s nothing like that. …  Baghdad is a wreck. It looks pretty much the way it did during the war.  Then I got on a plane and I flew to Erbil, which is the capitol of Kurdistan and you feel like Dorothy. It’s amazing. There’s a Jaguar dealership in Erbil and there’s sushi restaurants and there’s dance clubs and I remember one night I had been out of town and I drove back … and I found a liquor store open and bought a six-pack of beer at 3 o’clock in the morning in the Middle East, I mean, that’s impossible anywhere for a thousand miles! It’s such a shock when you see it. You think, ‘God! I can’t believe I’m still in Iraq,’ and …  that’s really what the story is about. In a way, it’s really not part of Iraq.  Not anymore. 

    Gross: They don’t want to be part of Iraq anymore. 

    Filkins: Technically they’re part of Iraq but they don’t want to be and in a de-facto way, in very real way, they’re not part of Iraq, they’re pulling away. They want to make it official and I think probably … it will be independent I think sooner rather than later—though it’s hard to tell exactly when. 

    Gross: So how close is ISIS now to Kurdistan? 

    Filkins: It’s right on the border. It’s really weird, actually. The Erbil that I just described, you know, sushi restaurants and Jaguar dealerships and high-rises being built everywhere—30 miles away is ISIS and the 8th century. It’s weird because you can just drive, you can leave your fancy hotel, get in a car and drive to the front line in an hour and there it is. I was on a canal south of the city of Kirkuk and … and right across the canal was ISIS and you could see, they were flying their flags, they were driving around, you could see them over there manning their checkpoints, and I have to say it felt really eerie, like I was on the border of two countries. 

    Photo Credit: Spencer Platt / Getty Staff

    Caption: KIRKUK, IRAQ - JULY 03: Soldiers with the Kurdish peshmerga walk at an outpost on the edges of the contested city of Kirkuk on July 3, 2014 in Kirkuk, Iraq.

  2. fresh air

    dexter filkins

    iraq

    kurdistan

    war

    new yorker

  1. Did you catch the Colbert Report last night? There was a steamy appearance by our lady, Terry Gross. (It starts around 3 min into the episode) 
Stephen and Terry have talked many times, but here’s the latest one.  View in High-Res

    Did you catch the Colbert Report last night? There was a steamy appearance by our lady, Terry Gross. (It starts around 3 min into the episode) 

    Stephen and Terry have talked many times, but here’s the latest one

  2. colbert report

    stephen colbert

    terry gross

    fresh air

    npr

    gif

  1. When New York Times columnist Charles Blow was 7 years old, he was sexually abused by his cousin.  The traumatic experience sent him on a path of self-questioning in hopes of understanding how it happened, why it happened, and what it meant. His new memoir, Fire Shut Up in My Bones, is a unwavering account of his abuse and how he healed. 

    In the interview Blow discusses the correlation between victims of child sexual abuse and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender identity:

    "What the data shows us indisputably is that people who will later identify as LGBT have disproportionate rates of having been victims of child sexual abuse. So there are two ways to think of that — one of which I completely disagree with and one I agree more with.

    On the one end, the abuse is making these young people LGBT. The science for that is completely flimsy. I completely disagree with that idea. On the other side … children who will eventually identify as LGBT are more likely to be targets of sexual predators. If you think of it that way, it changes our concept of how we need to nurture and care for children who are different. …

    If you look at it that way you realize that in some cases, not all of course, in some cases the predator is targeting children who they already see as kind of having some kind of characteristics that will later be different. And that difference means they’re isolated. That difference means that they are already outside of the social mores, that the predator behavior is now somehow justified because this person is already outside the norm.”

    Photo: By Chad Batka, NYT 

  2. LGBT

    Interview

    fresh air

    charles blow

    abuse

    fire shut up in my bones

  1. Today André Benjamin, aka André 3000, joins us to talk about portraying legendary guitarist Jimi Hendrix in the new biopic, Jimi: All Is By My Side. 

    What was it like learning how to play like Hendrix?

    "I had to learn everything from playing behind my back to playing with my teeth to rolling around on the ground playing. I watched all the footage and I mimicked everything to a T, just to have it in the arsenal, just in case we needed it.

    One of the hardest parts [was] I’m a right-hand guitar player. I’m a horrible right-hand guitar player. I wouldn’t even call myself a guitar player; I just pick it up and fiddle with it every now and then. And I think any guitar player would agree with me, Jimi is the most comfortable-looking guitar player in the world. I’ve seen a lot of great guitarists that are probably much better skilled than Jimi Hendrix, but some players look like they’re doing a task or … putting in a lot of work, giving a lot of effort. One thing about Jimi, he never looked like it was uncomfortable to him. …

    When it came time to do the left-hand thing, I almost had to [do] finger choreography, learning where the chords are, learning the actual chords of the song with my left hand, learning where the notes are, learning how my fingers should lay. But it was really, really difficult, because it’s almost like walking backwards and making walking backwards look normal.”

  2. jimi hendrix

    andre benjamin

    andre 3000

    all is by my side

    fresh air

    interview

  1. Posted on 23 September, 2014

    609 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from back-then

    Maureen Corrigan reviews The Paying Guests by Sarah Waters. The novel opens in 1922 in the ‘suburban backwater’ of London, where Frances Wray and her mother have fallen from the middle class and must take ‘paying guests’ into their home to stay afloat. 

"The Paying Guests is no simple period piece. As alert as Waters is to historical detail, she’s also a superb storyteller with a gift for capturing the layered nuances of character and mood. Any reader familiar with Waters’ earlier novels like Tipping the Velvet will know that she’s especially drawn to the subject of lesbian relationships. What’s so immediately compelling about our protagonist, Frances Wray, is that, in a way that doesn’t seem at all anachronistic, she’s comfortable in her own queer skin. It’s most of the rest of the world — and, tragically, some of the people in her own house — who have serious problems with Frances and her so-called “unnatural” sexuality.”

Girls playing ukuleles, 1926
  View in High-Res

    Maureen Corrigan reviews The Paying Guests by Sarah Waters. The novel opens in 1922 in the ‘suburban backwater’ of London, where Frances Wray and her mother have fallen from the middle class and must take ‘paying guests’ into their home to stay afloat. 

    "The Paying Guests is no simple period piece. As alert as Waters is to historical detail, she’s also a superb storyteller with a gift for capturing the layered nuances of character and mood. Any reader familiar with Waters’ earlier novels like Tipping the Velvet will know that she’s especially drawn to the subject of lesbian relationships. What’s so immediately compelling about our protagonist, Frances Wray, is that, in a way that doesn’t seem at all anachronistic, she’s comfortable in her own queer skin. It’s most of the rest of the world — and, tragically, some of the people in her own house — who have serious problems with Frances and her so-called “unnatural” sexuality.”

    Girls playing ukuleles, 1926

     

  2. maureen corrigan

    review

    1920s

    london

    fresh air

    the paying guests