1. Lynne Olson tells Terry Gross why many students opposed U.S. intervention in World War II:

[T]hese kids were basically saying, ‘Hell no, we don’t want to go to war. This is something we absolutely do not want to do.’ And this major isolationist organization, … America First, was founded by a bunch of Yale students — Yale law students and Yale undergraduates — and among them were young men who went on to have incredibly illustrious careers. … Gerald Ford was a Yale law student and he was one of the founders of America First. Potter Stewart, who later went on the Supreme Court, was also a founder. Sargent Shriver, the first head of the Peace Corps, was a founder, as was Kingman Brewster, who later became president of Yale and, quite ironically, U.S. ambassador to Great Britain. Among the students who supported America First were John F. Kennedy, who was a Harvard senior, and Kurt Vonnegut and a young prep school student named  Gore Vidal.

Image via S-USIH

    Lynne Olson tells Terry Gross why many students opposed U.S. intervention in World War II:

    [T]hese kids were basically saying, ‘Hell no, we don’t want to go to war. This is something we absolutely do not want to do.’ And this major isolationist organization, … America First, was founded by a bunch of Yale students — Yale law students and Yale undergraduates — and among them were young men who went on to have incredibly illustrious careers. … Gerald Ford was a Yale law student and he was one of the founders of America First. Potter Stewart, who later went on the Supreme Court, was also a founder. Sargent Shriver, the first head of the Peace Corps, was a founder, as was Kingman Brewster, who later became president of Yale and, quite ironically, U.S. ambassador to Great Britain. Among the students who supported America First were John F. Kennedy, who was a Harvard senior, and Kurt Vonnegut and a young prep school student named Gore Vidal.

    Image via S-USIH

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Lynne Olson

    Those Angry Days

    America First Committee

    Charles Lindbergh

    Franklin Roosevelt

    History

    World War II

  1. Maureen Corrigan reviews Hazel Rowley’s book about Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt’s unconventional marriage: "Nothing against the French, but there’s no contest here.  While Sartre  and de Beauvoir were hashing over gender roles in sequestered cafes,  Franklin and Eleanor had already forged their own cutting edge version  of a marriage, despite living for nearly four terms in the fishbowl of  the White House." View in High-Res

    Maureen Corrigan reviews Hazel Rowley’s book about Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt’s unconventional marriage: "Nothing against the French, but there’s no contest here.  While Sartre and de Beauvoir were hashing over gender roles in sequestered cafes, Franklin and Eleanor had already forged their own cutting edge version of a marriage, despite living for nearly four terms in the fishbowl of the White House."

  2. franklin roosevelt

    fdr

    eleanor roosevelt

    hazel rowley

    maureen corrigan

    npr

    fresh air

  1. I wanted to give the impression of being a quiet, orderly woman who didn’t buzz-buzz all the time. … I knew that a lady interposing an idea into men’s conversation is very unwelcome. I just proceeded on the theory that this was a gentleman’s conversation on the porch of a golf club perhaps. You didn’t butt in with bright ideas.

    — Frances Perkins, President Roosevelt’s Secretary of Labor, on her first Cabinet meeting. Happy Labor Day! Catch you on Tuesday, Tumblr!

  2. fresh air

    maureen corrigan

    frances perkins

    franklin roosevelt