1. This is awesome

    Folklorist Alan Lomax spent his career documenting folk music traditions from around the world. Now thousands of the songs and interviews he recorded are available for free online, many for the first time. It’s part of what Lomax envisioned for the collection — long before the age of the Internet.

    Related: Alan Lomax on Fresh Air

  2. alan lomax

    documentary

    history

    interviews

    folklore

    folk music

  1. There’s a website called Folklore.org with many stories/pictures/oral histories from the original Mac team. I found it while doing research for our Steve Jobs piece today. If you’re into computing history, it’s worth a visit. 

    There’s a website called Folklore.org with many stories/pictures/oral histories from the original Mac team. I found it while doing research for our Steve Jobs piece today. If you’re into computing history, it’s worth a visit. 

  2. folklore

    steve jobs

    mac

  1. I was running the folk archive there when the archive was shut down by a rabid born-again Southerner who attacked it because we had recorded that cantankerous, rambling ballad-maker Woody Guthrie. He just then, by the way, recorded “This Land Is Your Land” and I recorded it for the Library of Congress. But they were so severe about it that they cut the whole Library of Congress appropriation out. Later it was put back but the archive didn’t recover for many years.

    — Folklorist Alan Lomax, on the Library of Congress folk archive being censored for recording Woody Guthrie, in an interview that originally aired on Fresh Air in 1990.

  2. alan lomax

    folklore

    library of congress

    woody guthrie

    this land is your land

  1. Folklorist Alan Lomax, explaining how he fell into his craft: I saw that the job of a folklorist was to make a bridge between people  who had no voice and the big world of communication. That’s  what I did for the first half of my life, was simply run with a  recording machine and record. In the West Indies, in Spain, in Great  Britain — and to publish the results because this was the way people  could learn that other folks were out there, just as interesting as they  were.”

    Folklorist Alan Lomax, explaining how he fell into his craft: I saw that the job of a folklorist was to make a bridge between people who had no voice and the big world of communication. That’s what I did for the first half of my life, was simply run with a recording machine and record. In the West Indies, in Spain, in Great Britain — and to publish the results because this was the way people could learn that other folks were out there, just as interesting as they were.”

  2. alan lomax

    folklore

    library of congress

    terry gross

    fresh air

  1. Alan Lomax, Musicians playing in the street, Caffiano, Campania, Italy, 1955

    Alan Lomax, Musicians playing in the street, Caffiano, Campania, Italy, 1955

  2. alan lomax

    italy

    library of congress

    folklore

  1. Alan Lomax, Basque Province 1952, from the Alan Lomax Library of Congress collection.

    Alan Lomax, Basque Province 1952, from the Alan Lomax Library of Congress collection.

  2. spain

    alan lomax

    folklore

    library of congress

  1. Also on today’s show: we play an archival 1990 interview with folklorist Alan Lomax. This is a picture he took in 1959 during one of his many trips to the American South.

    Also on today’s show: we play an archival 1990 interview with folklorist Alan Lomax. This is a picture he took in 1959 during one of his many trips to the American South.

  2. alan lomax

    folklore

    library of congress