1. Writers You Want to Punch in the Face(book)

    Check out Rebecca Makkai’s great post on the fine balance between promoting work on social media and being obnoxious. 

    "This is the story of Todd Manly-Krauss, the world’s most irritating writer. He’s a good enough guy in real life (holds his liquor, fun at parties, writes a hell of a short story)—but give the guy a social media account, and the most mild-mannered of his writer friends will turn to blood lust."

    Fresh Air even gets a shout out: 

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  2. writers

    facebook

    terry gross

    ploughshares literary magazine

  1. Facebook has a lot of influence over kids who are mean. They know from their own data that when they tell kids that they’ve posted something inappropriate [and] they ask them to take it down, those kids don’t re-offend. Facebook’s line on this to me was that they have a very low recidivism rate, and so to me, that suggests that Facebook can really use its influence to the good with kids in a way it has been reluctant to do so far, because it doesn’t want to be seen as uncool.

    — Emily Bazelon, the author of Sticks and Stones, tells Terry Gross what Facebook could be doing to help stem cyberbullying.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Emily Bazelon

    Sticks and Stones

    Facebook

  1. Tanja Hollander decided to take portraits of all 626 of her Facebook friends. View in High-Res

    Tanja Hollander decided to take portraits of all 626 of her Facebook friends.

  2. photography

    facebook

    social media

    tanja hollander

  1. We know that Facebook has the ability and does target you on their website in an enormous number of ways. They don’t give your name to any of the advertisers — it’s all done anonymously. I’m not a fan of the distinction between anonymity and non-anonymity. … If you’re Joe Schmoe online or they know your real name or they give you an identification number — and so much of our lives is done online — in the end it doesn’t matter. You’re treated like a person who they know with all of the possible discriminatory activities we’ve talked about.

    — Joseph Turow on online privacy.

  2. privacy

    facebook

    joseph turow

  1. We used all the available tools in order to communicate with each other, collaborate and agree on a date, a time and a location for the start of the revolution. Yet, starting Jan. 28, the revolution was on the streets. It was not on Facebook, it was not on Twitter. Those were tools to relay information, to tell people the truth about what’s happening on the ground.

    — Internet activist Wael Ghonim says sites like Facebook are tools that can help connect people and disseminate information to the masses, but cannot create social changes on their own.

  2. wael ghonim

    jan25

    facebook

    twitter

    egypt

  1. I was writing with my heart, not my keyboard. I was writing what I felt should be written.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, Internet activist Wael Ghonim talks about how his Facebook page helped start Egypt’s revolution.

  2. wael ghonim

    egypt

    tahrir square

    twitter

    facebook

    jan25

  1. Everyone around the Web has seen the ‘like’ buttons from Facebook. And Facebook is collecting all of that information. They’re also collecting information about the way you interact with your friends — stuff you share with them, stuff they click on, who comments on what. It has all of this data and because it has all that data, it becomes a very valuable advertising company, but it can also move into other areas of the tech business. They’ve added an app for iPhone and Android phones that allows customers to text message with each other and bypass the cell phone text messaging system. And they’ll create a lot more of those kinds of apps in the future.

    — Farhad Manjoo on Facebook’s business model.

  2. facebook

    data

    farhad manjoo

  1. On Thursday’s Fresh Air, Farhad Manjoo explains how Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google are heading in new directions — and encroaching on each other’s  territory — as they each try to expand their customer base.

    On Thursday’s Fresh Air, Farhad Manjoo explains how Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google are heading in new directions — and encroaching on each other’s territory — as they each try to expand their customer base.

  2. google

    amazon

    apple

    facebook

    farhad manjoo

  1. social media strategy?

    Do the people on here who use Tumblr for work have a strategy?

    The reason I ask is because I don’t think I have a strategy — and I think that’s why Tumblr works so well. And a person just called and asked what my strategy was and I had to admit that there isn’t one and I Tumblr when I need to take a 30-second mental break.

    The way I think of Tumblr is that it’s kind of a free-for-all, post-what-have-you kind of site. Some stuff works and some stuff doesn’t. I usually post when I need to take a mental breather from writing stuff for freshair.npr.org. Sometimes I post 3 times a day. Sometimes 10. Sometimes I take a break from writing (the bulk of my day) and go through the Dashboard. 

    I’d love to get your thoughts on this.  

  2. social media strategy

    social media

    tumblr

    twitter

    facebook

  1. NPR’s Robert Krulwich ponders the recent infographic that shows peak break-up times on Facebook based on status-message-data-crunching. (Apparently we’re now entering the ‘danger season.’ Be afraid, ye in relationships.)
He wants to know what you see when you look at the graph. What do you believe? What do you doubt? What did you learn? Let him know. View in High-Res

    NPR’s Robert Krulwich ponders the recent infographic that shows peak break-up times on Facebook based on status-message-data-crunching. (Apparently we’re now entering the ‘danger season.’ Be afraid, ye in relationships.)

    He wants to know what you see when you look at the graph. What do you believe? What do you doubt? What did you learn? Let him know.

  2. in a relationship

    is single

    npr

    robert krulwich

    facebook

  1. Film critic David Edelstein on the acting in The Social Network: “Only singer Justin Timberlake comes through with a nuanced performance  as the sleazy former Napster co-creator whose hustle is just what  Facebook needs.” (Picture: Merrick Morton/Columbia Pictures) View in High-Res

    Film critic David Edelstein on the acting in The Social Network: “Only singer Justin Timberlake comes through with a nuanced performance as the sleazy former Napster co-creator whose hustle is just what Facebook needs.” (Picture: Merrick Morton/Columbia Pictures)

  2. social network

    david edelstein

    fresh air

    npr

    justin timberlake

    facebook

    napster