1. 91 percent of the seafood Americans eat comes from abroad, but one-third of the seafood Americans catch gets sold to other countries.  Paul Greenberg  is the author of the new book American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood.

Greenberg tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross about what's driving the changes in America's seafood economy. “What I think we're doing is we're low-grading our seafood supply,” he says.  “We're sending the really great, wild stuff that we harvest here on our shores abroad, and in exchange, we're importing farm stuff that, frankly, is of an increasingly dubious nature.”

The U.S. exports the best quality fish because Americans eat only about 15 pounds per capita of seafood a year. That’s about half the global average. There’s incentive to make the seafood cheap, easy and less about taste, which means moving away from local providers:


"We don’t want fish markets in our viewshed. We don’t want to smell them. We don’t want to look at them. So they really have been banished from the center of our cities and sequestered to a corner of our supermarkets.
This is a process that aids all of the facelessness and commodification of seafood. … Seafood has been taken out of the hands of the experts and put into the hands of the traders, so people really cannot identify the specificity of fish anymore. Because supermarkets rely on mass distribution systems, often frozen product, it means that the relationship between coastal producers of seafood is broken and so it’s much easier for them to deal with the Syscos of the world, or these large purveyors that use these massive shrimp operations in Thailand or China, than it is for them to deal with the kind of knotty nature of local fishermen.”


Paul Greenberg did a cooking demo with the Washington Post. Here are recipes for 'Beijing Style' Fish Fillets, Hannoi Style Fried Fish, Korean Spicy Fish Stew.

Photograph by Rich Frishman via National Geographic 
A Pike Place Market fishmonger handles the goods at Pure Food Fish Market in Seattle, Washington View in High-Res

    91 percent of the seafood Americans eat comes from abroad, but one-third of the seafood Americans catch gets sold to other countries.  Paul Greenberg  is the author of the new book American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood.

    Greenberg tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross about what's driving the changes in America's seafood economy. “What I think we're doing is we're low-grading our seafood supply,” he says.  “We're sending the really great, wild stuff that we harvest here on our shores abroad, and in exchange, we're importing farm stuff that, frankly, is of an increasingly dubious nature.”

    The U.S. exports the best quality fish because Americans eat only about 15 pounds per capita of seafood a year. That’s about half the global average. There’s incentive to make the seafood cheap, easy and less about taste, which means moving away from local providers:

    "We don’t want fish markets in our viewshed. We don’t want to smell them. We don’t want to look at them. So they really have been banished from the center of our cities and sequestered to a corner of our supermarkets.

    This is a process that aids all of the facelessness and commodification of seafood. … Seafood has been taken out of the hands of the experts and put into the hands of the traders, so people really cannot identify the specificity of fish anymore. Because supermarkets rely on mass distribution systems, often frozen product, it means that the relationship between coastal producers of seafood is broken and so it’s much easier for them to deal with the Syscos of the world, or these large purveyors that use these massive shrimp operations in Thailand or China, than it is for them to deal with the kind of knotty nature of local fishermen.”

    Paul Greenberg did a cooking demo with the Washington Post. Here are recipes for 'Beijing Style' Fish Fillets, Hannoi Style Fried Fish, Korean Spicy Fish Stew.

    Photograph by Rich Frishman via National Geographic 

    A Pike Place Market fishmonger handles the goods at Pure Food Fish Market in Seattle, Washington

  2. seafood

    environment

    paul greenberg

    interview

    fresh air

    fish

    american catch

  1. The Canadian government has approved the Northern Gateway oil pipeline from Alberta to the coast of British Columbia, despite protests from environmental groups. The Northern Gateway pipeline would carry 500,000 barrels of bitumen a day, compared to the Keystone XL pipeline at 700,000. Keystone XL’s approval is still under dispute in Washington. 
To learn more about Keystone XL and large-scale oil pipelines check out our interview with journalist Ryan Lizza. He explains the environmental consequences, the Canadian energy industry, and what Obama can do about this issue. 


Photo of cranes in a port in British Columbia by Julie Gordon/ Reuters via NYT View in High-Res

    The Canadian government has approved the Northern Gateway oil pipeline from Alberta to the coast of British Columbia, despite protests from environmental groups. The Northern Gateway pipeline would carry 500,000 barrels of bitumen a day, compared to the Keystone XL pipeline at 700,000. Keystone XL’s approval is still under dispute in Washington. 

    To learn more about Keystone XL and large-scale oil pipelines check out our interview with journalist Ryan Lizza. He explains the environmental consequences, the Canadian energy industry, and what Obama can do about this issue. 

    Photo of cranes in a port in British Columbia by Julie Gordon/ Reuters via NYT

  2. environment

    oil

    keystone XL

    northern gateway

    interview

  1. Elizabeth Kolbert's book The Sixth Extinction tells the story of the Panamanian Golden Frog, a species that was nearly wiped out by an unfamiliar fungus. Kolbert shares a theory of how this fungus was carried to the frog’s population:

One theory — it has been very difficult to pin down — but it’s that this fungus was moved around the world. Another really interesting story on frogs [is that they] were used in the ’50s and’60s for pregnancy tests. Something called the African Clawed Frog, if you inject it with the urine of a woman who is pregnant, it will lay eggs very quickly. And obstetricians used to keep whole tanks of these frogs in their offices. And the African Clawed Frog turns out to be a frog that carries this fungus but doesn’t seem to be killed by it. So one theory is that as these frogs were [exported] around the world, they carried this fungus with them … so we brought the frogs and the frogs brought the fungus.



illustration by David Hughes, The New Yorker View in High-Res

    Elizabeth Kolbert's book The Sixth Extinction tells the story of the Panamanian Golden Frog, a species that was nearly wiped out by an unfamiliar fungus. Kolbert shares a theory of how this fungus was carried to the frog’s population:

    One theory — it has been very difficult to pin down — but it’s that this fungus was moved around the world. Another really interesting story on frogs [is that they] were used in the ’50s and’60s for pregnancy tests. Something called the African Clawed Frog, if you inject it with the urine of a woman who is pregnant, it will lay eggs very quickly. And obstetricians used to keep whole tanks of these frogs in their offices. And the African Clawed Frog turns out to be a frog that carries this fungus but doesn’t seem to be killed by it. So one theory is that as these frogs were [exported] around the world, they carried this fungus with them … so we brought the frogs and the frogs brought the fungus.

    illustration by David Hughes, The New Yorker

  2. elizabeth kolbert

    the sixth extinction

    frogs

    environment

  1. We are effectively undoing the beauty and the variety and the richness of the world which has taken tens of millions of years to reach this point. We’re sort of unraveling that… We’re doing, it’s often said, a massive experiment on the planet and we really don’t know what the end point is going to be.

    — 

    Elizabeth Kolbert

    Wednesday: We discuss how human activity is responsible for a mass extinction. Kolbert’s new book is called The Sixth Extinction.

  2. fresh air

    interview

    elizabeteh kolbert

    extinction

    environment

    the sixth extinction

  1. In the environmental groups, [they] talk about [circular economies] a lot. … If you think of buying a pair of Nike shoes in Los Angeles, it will come in a cardboard box. You’ll toss that cardboard box into a recycling bin; that [box] will eventually make its way to China where [it] will be turned into a new cardboard box for Nike and shipped back to the United States, and the circle continues.

    — Adam Minter explains the often-hidden global recycling industry

  2. fresh air

    recycling

    adam minter

    junkyard planet

    circular economy

    nike

    china

    los angeles

    environment

  1. New Yorker reporter Ryan Lizza joins Fresh Air to discuss “unconventional” oil resources and the Keystone Pipeline project in Northern Alberta Canada and its environmental and political ramifications:

As we sit here in October of 2013, immigration reform seems dead, gun control legislation is dead, and the government is shut down with no grand bargain in sight. So a lot of environmentalists say, “Why not concentrate on the things you can do unilaterally?” And one of those things you can do unilaterally is address climate change…


photo of oil spill via the New York Times View in High-Res

    New Yorker reporter Ryan Lizza joins Fresh Air to discuss “unconventional” oil resources and the Keystone Pipeline project in Northern Alberta Canada and its environmental and political ramifications:

    As we sit here in October of 2013, immigration reform seems dead, gun control legislation is dead, and the government is shut down with no grand bargain in sight. So a lot of environmentalists say, “Why not concentrate on the things you can do unilaterally?” And one of those things you can do unilaterally is address climate change

    photo of oil spill via the New York Times

  2. fresh air

    interview

    ryan lizza

    the new yorker

    keystone pipeline

    oil drilling

    environment

    climate change

    government shutdown

  1. The aptly-named Camille Seaman’s photographs of icebergs. View in High-Res

    The aptly-named Camille Seaman’s photographs of icebergs.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Justin Gillis

    Camille Seaman

    climate change

    photography

    environment

  1. New York Times environmental reporter Justin Gillis on how often he feels it’s necessary to quote climate change skeptics in his articles:

I quote the climate skeptics or deniers — whatever term you prefer — when they’re relevant. So when I’m doing a piece about the science itself and what the latest scientific findings are, especially if that’s a short piece, I don’t necessarily feel obliged to quote the climate skeptics the same way that if you were doing a story about evolution, a New York Times reporter wouldn’t feel obliged to call up a creationist and ask them what they think. On the other hand, the climate skeptics are politically relevant at this point in American history [in a way] the creationists are not, for example, so we have a fair chunk of the Congress … that sees political traction right now in questioning climate science or purporting not to believe it and so, in a political story or in a longer story, I usually do give some amount of space to the climate skeptics.

Image by Jonathan Stead/Flickr

    New York Times environmental reporter Justin Gillis on how often he feels it’s necessary to quote climate change skeptics in his articles:

    I quote the climate skeptics or deniers — whatever term you prefer — when they’re relevant. So when I’m doing a piece about the science itself and what the latest scientific findings are, especially if that’s a short piece, I don’t necessarily feel obliged to quote the climate skeptics the same way that if you were doing a story about evolution, a New York Times reporter wouldn’t feel obliged to call up a creationist and ask them what they think. On the other hand, the climate skeptics are politically relevant at this point in American history [in a way] the creationists are not, for example, so we have a fair chunk of the Congress … that sees political traction right now in questioning climate science or purporting not to believe it and so, in a political story or in a longer story, I usually do give some amount of space to the climate skeptics.

    Image by Jonathan Stead/Flickr

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Justin Gillis

    environment

    climate change

    journalism

  1. Kristen Iversen spent years in Europe looking for things to write about before realizing that biggest story she’d ever cover was in the backyard where she grew up. Iversen spent her childhood in Colorado close to the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons factory, playing in fields and swimming in lakes and streams that it now appears were contaminated with plutonium. 

Rocky Flats Nuclear Processing Plant (by joiseyboyy) View in High-Res

    Kristen Iversen spent years in Europe looking for things to write about before realizing that biggest story she’d ever cover was in the backyard where she grew up. Iversen spent her childhood in Colorado close to the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons factory, playing in fields and swimming in lakes and streams that it now appears were contaminated with plutonium.

    Rocky Flats Nuclear Processing Plant (by joiseyboyy)

  2. kristen iversen

    rocky flats

    environment

  1. We pay for this stuff and it goes right into the waste bin, and we’re not capturing it the way our recycling programs are intending us to capture it. We’re just sticking it in the ground and building mountains out of it.

    — About 69 % of our trash goes immediately into landfills. And most landfill trash is made up of containers and packaging – almost all of which should be recycled, says Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Edward Humes,

  2. garbology

    edward humes

    garbage

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    environment

  1. Plastic that has floated on the islands of Midway Atoll. On tomorrow’s Fresh Air, we’ll talk to journalist Edward Humes about the Pacific Garbage Patch — and the other gyres of trash floating around our oceans.


Great Pacific Garbage Patch (by J Gilbert)

    Plastic that has floated on the islands of Midway Atoll. On tomorrow’s Fresh Air, we’ll talk to journalist Edward Humes about the Pacific Garbage Patch — and the other gyres of trash floating around our oceans.

    Great Pacific Garbage Patch (by J Gilbert)

  2. trash

    garbage

    environment

    edward humes

  1. Posted on 7 September, 2011

    1,080 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from latimes

    latimes:

In 1953, smog gets so bad in the shadow of City Hall that pedestrians carry rags to wipe away tears. Scientists began collecting smog particles in the 1950s to analyze what was causing the haze. The primary culprit turns out to be automobiles, not factories.
Photo: City Hall, merely across the street, is dim as Marion E. Lent gropes her way to work. Credit: R.L. Oliver / Los Angeles Times
Our Vintage Times series is presented on Tumblr with photography from the Los Angeles Times archives.
View in High-Res

    latimes:

    In 1953, smog gets so bad in the shadow of City Hall that pedestrians carry rags to wipe away tears. Scientists began collecting smog particles in the 1950s to analyze what was causing the haze. The primary culprit turns out to be automobiles, not factories.

    Photo: City Hall, merely across the street, is dim as Marion E. Lent gropes her way to work. Credit: R.L. Oliver / Los Angeles Times

    Our Vintage Times series is presented on Tumblr with photography from the Los Angeles Times archives.

  2. vintage

    los angeles

    black and white

    environment

  1. Today’s Fresh Air, Susan Freinkel on chemicals in plastics: “These chemicals act in a more convoluted and complicated way.  ”They interfere with our hormones and they interfere with the endocrine system, which is the network of glands that orchestrate growth and development. And there’s some research showing that DEHP, this chemical that’s in vinyl [used in IV bags] has this property. It interferes with testosterone.” [complete interview here] View in High-Res

    Today’s Fresh Air, Susan Freinkel on chemicals in plastics: “These chemicals act in a more convoluted and complicated way.  ”They interfere with our hormones and they interfere with the endocrine system, which is the network of glands that orchestrate growth and development. And there’s some research showing that DEHP, this chemical that’s in vinyl [used in IV bags] has this property. It interferes with testosterone.” [complete interview here]

  2. environment

    science

    plastic

    susan freinkel

    plastic: a toxic love story

    hormones

  1. Investigative reporter Charles Fishman on the future of clean, safe and cheap water: "In the U.S., we spend $21 billion a year buying bottled water and we spend $29 billion a year maintaining the entire water system — pipes, treatment plants, pumps. We spend almost as much on crushable plastic bottles of water as we do maintaining the water system." View in High-Res

    Investigative reporter Charles Fishman on the future of clean, safe and cheap water"In the U.S., we spend $21 billion a year buying bottled water and we spend $29 billion a year maintaining the entire water system — pipes, treatment plants, pumps. We spend almost as much on crushable plastic bottles of water as we do maintaining the water system."

  2. charles fishman

    water

    the big thirst

    bottled water

    environment

    science

  1. Surreal Environmental Images View in High-Res

    Surreal Environmental Images

  2. photography

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    sepia

    surreal

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