1. Fresh Air’s critic at large John Powers discusses the documentary The Square by Egyptian filmmaker Jehane Noujaim. The Square takes audiences into the Egyptian revolution and its aftermath by following three protestors’ stories. The film will be streaming on Netflix starting Friday:

    The Square is not a 360-degree portrait of recent Egyptian history. We don’t get to know the hardliners in the Muslim Brotherhood — and there are many of them — who would die, and are dying, to create an Islamic state.

    Nor do we hear from the millions of ordinary people who are now sick of all the demos in Tahrir Square and want life to get back to normal. Noujaim is consciously partial — and clearly on the secularists’ side.

    Yet the movie is no less gripping or revealing for that. As we’re plunged into scenes of both ecstasy and violence, it’s impossible not to be moved by the heroism of those who turned up in Tahrir Square realizing this just might get them killed. I’ve never done anything remotely so brave in pursuit of my own freedom.

  2. fresh air

    john powers

    the square

    jehane noujaim

    egypt

    egyptian revolution

    tahrir square

  1. Posted on 12 November, 2013

    5,148 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from natgeofound

    natgeofound:

In the light of early morning, the Vimy circles the pyramids at Giza on a dawn tour, May 1995.Photograph by James L. Stanfield, National Geographic
View in High-Res

    natgeofound:

    In the light of early morning, the Vimy circles the pyramids at Giza on a dawn tour, May 1995.Photograph by James L. Stanfield, National Geographic

  2. fresh air

    nat geo

    egypt

    pyramids

  1. Posted on 5 November, 2013

    211 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from picturemasr

    Photo break: The golden hues of Cairo brighten up this cold November day View in High-Res

    Photo break: The golden hues of Cairo brighten up this cold November day

  2. fresh air

    photo break

    cairo

    egypt

    staircase

  1. New York Times Cairo Bureau Chief, David Kirkpatrick, tells Terry Gross about Morsi's competence as President

What is the Morsi government? There’s Morsi and a small group of people around him and, for sure, they were not terrific. They made a lot of mistakes. They weren’t particularly well-qualified. … The Muslim Brotherhood — the movement that he came from — was sort of surprised to get power all of a sudden and sort of cobbled together a team as best they could. So those people, I’m not saying they were terrific — I’m not even saying they were competent — but they also weren’t in control.
You know, a lot of the people who were making decisions on a day-to-day basis below him throughout the bureaucracy hated him and I think they sort of passively or actively resisted him throughout, and so, you know, after a year perched uneasily … on top of this government it basically swallowed him up.

Image via ABC News View in High-Res

    New York Times Cairo Bureau Chief, David Kirkpatrick, tells Terry Gross about Morsi's competence as President

    What is the Morsi government? There’s Morsi and a small group of people around him and, for sure, they were not terrific. They made a lot of mistakes. They weren’t particularly well-qualified. … The Muslim Brotherhood — the movement that he came from — was sort of surprised to get power all of a sudden and sort of cobbled together a team as best they could. So those people, I’m not saying they were terrific — I’m not even saying they were competent — but they also weren’t in control.

    You know, a lot of the people who were making decisions on a day-to-day basis below him throughout the bureaucracy hated him and I think they sort of passively or actively resisted him throughout, and so, you know, after a year perched uneasily … on top of this government it basically swallowed him up.

    Image via ABC News

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    David Kirkpatrick

    New York Times

    Egypt

    Mohammed Morsi

    Muslim Brotherhood

  1. New York Times reporter David Kirkpatrick tells Terry Gross about the hyper-nationalist euphoria that has swept up even Egyptian liberals and leftists who spent years struggling against the country’s previous military-backed governments:

    I’ll put it bluntly: It’s how I imagine Europe in the first part of the 20th century might have felt during the rise of fascism. … It may not last. It may be just a momentary national hysteria, but at the moment there is a surreal-seeming enthusiasm for the military … even by people who just a few months ago were calling for the end of military rule.

    Top image via EuroNews; still from The Triumph of the Will

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    David Kirkpatrick

    The New York Times

    Egypt

    Morsi

    Arab Spring

    Triumph of the Will

    Hitler

  1. We used all the available tools in order to communicate with each other, collaborate and agree on a date, a time and a location for the start of the revolution. Yet, starting Jan. 28, the revolution was on the streets. It was not on Facebook, it was not on Twitter. Those were tools to relay information, to tell people the truth about what’s happening on the ground.

    — Internet activist Wael Ghonim says sites like Facebook are tools that can help connect people and disseminate information to the masses, but cannot create social changes on their own.

  2. wael ghonim

    jan25

    facebook

    twitter

    egypt

  1. I was writing with my heart, not my keyboard. I was writing what I felt should be written.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, Internet activist Wael Ghonim talks about how his Facebook page helped start Egypt’s revolution.

  2. wael ghonim

    egypt

    tahrir square

    twitter

    facebook

    jan25

  1. The protests that led to the Egyptian revolution, were organized in part by an anonymous Facebook user. When the police found out who he was, they arrested and interrogated him. Now, Wael Ghonim is internationally famous. On tomorrow’s Fresh Air, we talk to Wael Ghonim about revolutions, Egypt, and social media.
(Tweet from Ghonim last Jan. Complete Storify to acclimate yourself.) View in High-Res

    The protests that led to the Egyptian revolution, were organized in part by an anonymous Facebook user. When the police found out who he was, they arrested and interrogated him. Now, Wael Ghonim is internationally famous. On tomorrow’s Fresh Air, we talk to Wael Ghonim about revolutions, Egypt, and social media.

    (Tweet from Ghonim last Jan. Complete Storify to acclimate yourself.)

  2. ghonim

    egypt

    social media

    twitter

  1. Tomorrow’s Fresh Air: Democracy movements are sweeping across the Middle East. But the dramatic changes in Egypt, Tunisia, Libya and Syria have not yet come to the West Bank. If and when that does occur, it could be a game-changer for Israel and the United States according to Robert Malley. He’s the program director for the Middle East and North Africa at the International Crisis Group. View in High-Res

    Tomorrow’s Fresh Air: Democracy movements are sweeping across the Middle East. But the dramatic changes in Egypt, Tunisia, Libya and Syria have not yet come to the West Bank. If and when that does occur, it could be a game-changer for Israel and the United States according to Robert Malley. He’s the program director for the Middle East and North Africa at the International Crisis Group.

  2. middle east

    arab spring

    robert malley

    international crisis group

    syria

    libya

    egypt

    israel

    west bank

  1. Journalist Charles Sennott, on the impact of the Egyptian revolution: "This was one of the really exciting and  beautiful aspects of this revolution, to see young people within  Egyptian society coming together from a lot of different walks of life. The 30-year truth of the regime of Mubarak was that he made  sure that never happened. He kept people divided. There was a concerted  attempt not to allow people to pull together like that. And I think  [those in Tahrir Square] were thrilled and energized by that and you  could feel it." View in High-Res

    Journalist Charles Sennott, on the impact of the Egyptian revolution: "This was one of the really exciting and beautiful aspects of this revolution, to see young people within Egyptian society coming together from a lot of different walks of life. The 30-year truth of the regime of Mubarak was that he made sure that never happened. He kept people divided. There was a concerted attempt not to allow people to pull together like that. And I think [those in Tahrir Square] were thrilled and energized by that and you could feel it."

  2. egypt

    charles sennott

    frontline

    pbs

    muslim brotherhood

  1. Dispatch from today’s guest, Charles Sennott, last Friday in Cairo.

    To be there on the ground to see history unfold was the most exciting and thrilling story I have ever covered in 25 years of reporting.

  2. charles sennott

    frontline

    cairo

    fresh air

    egypt

  1. Posted on 11 February, 2011

    78 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from lookhigh

    lookhigh:

30 years seems like yesterday
Timeline: Presidency Of Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak : NPR
View in High-Res

    lookhigh:

    30 years seems like yesterday

    Timeline: Presidency Of Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak : NPR

  2. egypt

    hosni mubarak

  1. maybesomethingbeautiful:


Tens of thousands of anti-government protesters marched in Alexandria, Egypt’s second-largest city, on Friday.

    maybesomethingbeautiful:

    Tens of thousands of anti-government protesters marched in Alexandria, Egypt’s second-largest city, on Friday.

  2. egypt

  1. Posted on 11 February, 2011

    765 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from msnbc

    The people have brought down the regime!

    — what the protesters in Tahrir Square are chanting as they celebrate (via msnbc)

  2. egypt

  1. Mubarak Steps Down From Power View in High-Res

    Mubarak Steps Down From Power

  2. egypt

    mubarak