1. Anthro-zoologist John Bradshaw is the author of the books Cat Sense and Dog Sense and is an expert in animal behavior.  Fresh Air spoke to him for both books and today we’re playing bits of each interview back-to-back. Whether you’re a cat person or a dog person, Bradshaw’s got you covered.
From the Cat Sense interview:

"I think cats are much less demonstrative animals than dogs are. It’s kind of not their fault; they evolved from a solitary animal that has never had the need for a sophisticated social repertoire in the way that the dog — having evolved from the wolf — had that ready-made. So their faces are just not terribly expressive, and some people read into that, that they’re kind of cynical and aloof and those sorts of things. But I don’t believe that for a moment. I think cats show, by their behavior, even if it’s a bit more subtle than a dog’s, that they really are fond of their owners."

From the Dog Sense interview: 

"I think dogs have a right to sniff things whenever it doesn’t cause a problem to us. When I meet a dog, I hold my hand out. I don’t stick my fingers right out, just in case, but I just make a loose fist and put my hand out to the dog. If it’s a small dog, I’ll squat down. And that dog will want to come and sniff my hand and lick it if necessary. That’s a greeting, and I think if we don’t do that, I think it’s as upsetting to the dog as if we were talking to somebody that we never met before and covered our faces at that point in time, as if we were trying to disguise who we were."


Photo: Andrew Tallon via Flickr View in High-Res

    Anthro-zoologist John Bradshaw is the author of the books Cat Sense and Dog Sense and is an expert in animal behavior.  Fresh Air spoke to him for both books and today we’re playing bits of each interview back-to-back. Whether you’re a cat person or a dog person, Bradshaw’s got you covered.

    From the Cat Sense interview:

    "I think cats are much less demonstrative animals than dogs are. It’s kind of not their fault; they evolved from a solitary animal that has never had the need for a sophisticated social repertoire in the way that the dog — having evolved from the wolf — had that ready-made. So their faces are just not terribly expressive, and some people read into that, that they’re kind of cynical and aloof and those sorts of things. But I don’t believe that for a moment. I think cats show, by their behavior, even if it’s a bit more subtle than a dog’s, that they really are fond of their owners."

    From the Dog Sense interview: 

    "I think dogs have a right to sniff things whenever it doesn’t cause a problem to us. When I meet a dog, I hold my hand out. I don’t stick my fingers right out, just in case, but I just make a loose fist and put my hand out to the dog. If it’s a small dog, I’ll squat down. And that dog will want to come and sniff my hand and lick it if necessary. That’s a greeting, and I think if we don’t do that, I think it’s as upsetting to the dog as if we were talking to somebody that we never met before and covered our faces at that point in time, as if we were trying to disguise who we were."

    Photo: Andrew Tallon via Flickr

  2. cats

    dogs

    pets

    interview

    fresh air

    animal behavior

    john bradshaw

    kitten

    puppy

  1. Tomorrow’s show is all about the science of dog and cat behavior, so stay tuned.  View in High-Res

    Tomorrow’s show is all about the science of dog and cat behavior, so stay tuned. 

  2. cats

    dogs

    puppies

    kittens

    fresh air

  1. Your afternoon photo break: the Westminster post we’ve been waiting for.
landonnordeman:

Slide Show: Portraits from Westminster Dog Show : The New Yorker
View in High-Res

    Your afternoon photo break: the Westminster post we’ve been waiting for.

    landonnordeman:

    Slide Show: Portraits from Westminster Dog Show : The New Yorker

  2. afternoon photo break

    wait and you shall recieve

    Landon Nordeman

    New Yorker

    hey good lookin

    dogs

  1. hiconsumption:

Dogs are curious creatures, and the fact that they are constantly attempting to dig themselves out of the back yard should be a clear indication of this.
The Pet Peek looks allows your dog to explore his/her curiosity, seeing exactly what’s on the other side of that fence without having to dig out.

For dogs and nosy humans. Imagine the conversation with neighbors during installation. View in High-Res

    hiconsumption:

    Dogs are curious creatures, and the fact that they are constantly attempting to dig themselves out of the back yard should be a clear indication of this.

    The Pet Peek looks allows your dog to explore his/her curiosity, seeing exactly what’s on the other side of that fence without having to dig out.

    For dogs and nosy humans. Imagine the conversation with neighbors during installation.

  2. dogs

    design

  1. Posted on 22 June, 2012

    943 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from notesondesign

    heidisaman:

It’s Friday.  You made it! Let’s celebrate.

Every Animal Story on Fresh Air from 2009-2012

    heidisaman:

    It’s Friday.  You made it! Let’s celebrate.

    Every Animal Story on Fresh Air from 2009-2012

    (Source: notesondesign)

  2. friday happiness photo

    dogs

    animals

  1. Posted on 8 November, 2011

    298 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from mysticbird

    How Dogs Evolved Into Our Best Friends: “There’s  something about them that makes us friends with them. There are people  who dislike dogs for sure. But dogs also have an uncanny ability … to  walk in a room and pick out the one or two who seem to dislike dogs the  most and make friends with them. It’s happened to me with some of my  dogs on numerous occasions. I think there’s a deep — some people call it  love, I call it a ‘deep empathy’ between these two species — that  resonates with each other in a way that makes them comprehensible to  each other even though they don’t speak the same language.” View in High-Res

    How Dogs Evolved Into Our Best Friends: “There’s something about them that makes us friends with them. There are people who dislike dogs for sure. But dogs also have an uncanny ability … to walk in a room and pick out the one or two who seem to dislike dogs the most and make friends with them. It’s happened to me with some of my dogs on numerous occasions. I think there’s a deep — some people call it love, I call it a ‘deep empathy’ between these two species — that resonates with each other in a way that makes them comprehensible to each other even though they don’t speak the same language.”

  2. dog

    dogs

    dogs!

    animals

    mark derr

  1. Gives one reason to paws. (Happy weekend!)

  2. npr

    trivia

    facts

    animals

    dogs

    theft

    news

    weekend edition

  1. On today’s Fresh Air, animal behaviorist John Bradshaw details why positive reinforcement works better than punishment and offers tips for making your dog less anxious when you leave the house: "You train your dog to toilet outside. You train your dog to sit on  command. You should also train your dog to cope with being  left alone." View in High-Res

    On today’s Fresh Air, animal behaviorist John Bradshaw details why positive reinforcement works better than punishment and offers tips for making your dog less anxious when you leave the house: "You train your dog to toilet outside. You train your dog to sit on command. You should also train your dog to cope with being left alone."

  2. dogs

    john bradshaw

    dog sense

    animals

  1. Posted on 25 May, 2011

    162 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from animalsyes

    animalsyes:

(via War Dog - An FP Photo Essay By Rebecca Frankel | Foreign Policy)

Tomorrow: military dogs, olfactory senses, playing tug-of-war with pets, reprimanding dogs, dog anxiety, breeding. Guest: animal behaviorist John Bradshaw View in High-Res

    animalsyes:

    (via War Dog - An FP Photo Essay By Rebecca Frankel | Foreign Policy)

    Tomorrow: military dogs, olfactory senses, playing tug-of-war with pets, reprimanding dogs, dog anxiety, breeding. Guest: animal behaviorist John Bradshaw

  2. john bradshaw

    dogs

  1. Posted on 25 May, 2011

    272 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from frostskader

    Tomorrow: animal behaviorist John Bradshaw tells us what pet owners should expect from their dogs — and what their dogs should expect in return SQUIRREL from their owners. 

    Tomorrow: animal behaviorist John Bradshaw tells us what pet owners should expect from their dogs — and what their dogs should expect in return SQUIRREL from their owners. 

  2. john bradshaw

    dogs

    animals

    animal behavior

    pets

  1. Posted on 30 March, 2011

    1,209 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from latimes

    lookhigh:


latimes:

“Some question why scarce resources should be devoted to saving animals when gas shortages are endemic and human beings have so many needs,” Mark Magnier reports from Miyako, Japan. ”Their response: The welfare of animals and people are often integrally linked.”
Photo: A volunteer rescue worker rescued this small brown dog in the debris fields of Natori, Japan. A loose network of groups is working to assist animals stressed by the ordeal and, in some cases, separated from their owners. Credit: Brian van der Brug, Los Angeles Times

View in High-Res

    lookhigh:

    latimes:

    “Some question why scarce resources should be devoted to saving animals when gas shortages are endemic and human beings have so many needs,” Mark Magnier reports from Miyako, Japan. ”Their response: The welfare of animals and people are often integrally linked.”

    Photo: A volunteer rescue worker rescued this small brown dog in the debris fields of Natori, Japan. A loose network of groups is working to assist animals stressed by the ordeal and, in some cases, separated from their owners. Credit: Brian van der Brug, Los Angeles Times

    (Source: Los Angeles Times)

  2. dogs

    pets

    japan

    latimes

  1. Vet Nicholas Dodman, on making end-of-life care decisions for your dog: "We listen carefully about what people  are telling us about a dog’s life and we look carefully at the dog. If they have reached a point where they have given up — they’re  basically lackluster, not enjoying life, not playing, not interacting,  haven’t responded to any therapies, losing interest in food and social  interactions — and nothing you can do can bring them back, you have to  think very seriously about what is the quality of life." View in High-Res

    Vet Nicholas Dodman, on making end-of-life care decisions for your dog: "We listen carefully about what people are telling us about a dog’s life and we look carefully at the dog. If they have reached a point where they have given up — they’re basically lackluster, not enjoying life, not playing, not interacting, haven’t responded to any therapies, losing interest in food and social interactions — and nothing you can do can bring them back, you have to think very seriously about what is the quality of life."

  2. nicholas dodman

    dogs

    old dogs

    good old dog

  1. dogaday:

lola
View in High-Res

    dogaday:

    lola

  2. dogs

  1. Do you have an older dog? Have any questions?

    We’re talking to veterinary behaviorist Nick Dodman tomorrow about the best ways to care for an aging dog. If you have any questions, let us know (and PLU-LEEZE post a picture of your dog….)

  2. dogs

    nick dodman

    aging dogs

  1. "As odd as it may seem, Michael Vick may be the best thing that ever  happened to the pit bull. He gave the forum to discuss this and make it  possible to get the message out there that these dogs are not what  they’ve been made out to be in the headlines, that they really are just  sort of dogs. And a lot varies from each one to another and then how  they’re raised and socialized and all of these issues that go around  them. You can find the sweetest, most loving pitbulls in the world and  you can find other dogs that are as mean as you want." Jim Gorant, in The Road to Recovery for Michael Vick’s Dogs (Photo: Andrew Yorri) View in High-Res

    "As odd as it may seem, Michael Vick may be the best thing that ever happened to the pit bull. He gave the forum to discuss this and make it possible to get the message out there that these dogs are not what they’ve been made out to be in the headlines, that they really are just sort of dogs. And a lot varies from each one to another and then how they’re raised and socialized and all of these issues that go around them. You can find the sweetest, most loving pitbulls in the world and you can find other dogs that are as mean as you want." Jim Gorant, in The Road to Recovery for Michael Vick’s Dogs (Photo: Andrew Yorri)

  2. andrew yorri

    jim gorant

    the lost dogs

    dave davies

    fresh air

    npr

    michael vick

    pitbull

    dogs