1. "The anonymous urban explorer/photographer behind Detroiturbex.com is building a photographic record of Detroit’s abandoned buildings as way to spread awareness about the plight of the once thriving metropolis. As part of the project, the photographer has created a series of then and now composites that show the astonishingly rapid disintegration of Detroit’s abandoned buildings.”
Yesterday’s interview with Bruce Katz, co-author of The Metropolitan Revolution  talks explicitly about Detroit and why he thinks the city has “good bones.”

via  Laughing Squid View in High-Res

    "The anonymous urban explorer/photographer behind Detroiturbex.com is building a photographic record of Detroit’s abandoned buildings as way to spread awareness about the plight of the once thriving metropolis. As part of the project, the photographer has created a series of then and now composites that show the astonishingly rapid disintegration of Detroit’s abandoned buildings.”


    Yesterday’s interview with Bruce Katz, co-author of The Metropolitan Revolution  talks explicitly about Detroit and why he thinks the city has “good bones.”

    via  Laughing Squid

  2. fresh air

    interview

    bruce katz

    metropolitan revolution

    detroit

    abandoned buildings

  1. As you may have heard, Detroit has filed for bankruptcy. If you’re looking for some context and how and why this could have happened, you might want to give Detroit native and journalist Charlie LeDuff's book Detroit: An American Autopsy a read. We had him on the show a few months ago, and one of the things he reflected on was Detroit’s future:

I don’t mean that as an anthem to a dead city, but it’s almost there. Everybody asks me, ‘What’s the future here?’ and I say, ‘We have auto companies. We have the biggest trade corridor on the continent with Canada. We have all the freshwater in the world. We have great hospitals and the tech center. We are well-positioned, but none of that is going to flower until we weed the garden today of people like [former city councilwoman] Monica Conyers and these sludge contracts, and all the cheating and robbing and killing. Forget the future. Focus on the present. And if we don’t, then, yes, we will completely be dead.

Image via Wired View in High-Res

    As you may have heard, Detroit has filed for bankruptcy. If you’re looking for some context and how and why this could have happened, you might want to give Detroit native and journalist Charlie LeDuff's book Detroit: An American Autopsy a read. We had him on the show a few months ago, and one of the things he reflected on was Detroit’s future:

    I don’t mean that as an anthem to a dead city, but it’s almost there. Everybody asks me, ‘What’s the future here?’ and I say, ‘We have auto companies. We have the biggest trade corridor on the continent with Canada. We have all the freshwater in the world. We have great hospitals and the tech center. We are well-positioned, but none of that is going to flower until we weed the garden today of people like [former city councilwoman] Monica Conyers and these sludge contracts, and all the cheating and robbing and killing. Forget the future. Focus on the present. And if we don’t, then, yes, we will completely be dead.

    Image via Wired

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Charlie LeDuff

    Detroit

    Detroit An American Autopsy

  1. Detroit Grease Shop Poem

    Four bright steel crosses,
    universal joints, plucked
    out of the burlap sack —
    "the heart of the drive train,"
    the book says. Stars
    on Lemon’s wooden palm,
    stars that must be capped,
    rolled, and anointed,
    that have their orders
    and their commands as he
    has his.

    Under the blue
    hesitant light another day
    at Automotive
    in the city of dreams.
    We’re all here to count
    and be counted, Lemon,
    Rosie, Eugene, Luis,
    and me, too young to know
    this is for keeps, pinning
    on my apron, rolling up
    my sleeves.

    The roof leaks
    from yesterday’s rain,
    the waters gather above us
    waiting for one mistake.
    When a drop falls on Lemon’s
    corded arm, he looks at it
    as though it were something
    rare or mysterious
    like a drop of water or
    a single lucid meteor
    fallen slowly from
    nowhere and burning on
    his skin like a tear.

    - Philip Levine

    *a classic poem about Detroit by Detroit poet and former poet laureate Philip Levine (interview here). On the show today, Charlie LeDuff talks about his book Detroit: An American Autopsy.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Philip Levine

    Detroit

    Charlie LeDuff

  1. Today on the show we’re talking to Charlie LeDuff about Detroit and the term ‘ruin porn’ comes up in the conversation. So for some background, here’s an excellent essay, “Detroitism: What does ruin porn tell us about the Motor City, ourselves, other American cities” by John Patrick Leary.
Guernica:

That some of the recent focus on Detroit ruins is exploitative in its depiction of Detroit’s impoverishment bears repeating, but more compelling are the reasons for our contemporary fascination with images of first-world urban decline, and not just in the Motor City. Ruin websites, photography collections, and urban exploration blogs chronicle industrial ruins across North America and Europe, from Youngstown, Ohio to Bucharest, Romania. Yet Detroit remains the Mecca of urban ruins.

Image of the Detroit Marine Harbor Terminal by JRE313 via Flickr

    Today on the show we’re talking to Charlie LeDuff about Detroit and the term ‘ruin porn’ comes up in the conversation. So for some background, here’s an excellent essay, “Detroitism: What does ruin porn tell us about the Motor City, ourselves, other American cities” by John Patrick Leary.

    Guernica:

    That some of the recent focus on Detroit ruins is exploitative in its depiction of Detroit’s impoverishment bears repeating, but more compelling are the reasons for our contemporary fascination with images of first-world urban decline, and not just in the Motor City. Ruin websites, photography collections, and urban exploration blogs chronicle industrial ruins across North America and Europe, from Youngstown, Ohio to Bucharest, Romania. Yet Detroit remains the Mecca of urban ruins.

    Image of the Detroit Marine Harbor Terminal by JRE313 via Flickr

  2. Fresh Air

    Coming up

    Detroit

    Charlie LeDuff

    John Patrick Leary

  1. detroitnewsarchivist:

June 1 1935

An amazing photo archive of Detroit. Enjoy. View in High-Res

    detroitnewsarchivist:

    June 1 1935

    An amazing photo archive of Detroit. Enjoy.

  2. detroit

    photography

    black and white

    cities

  1. “Some 1,200 feet beneath the streets of Detroit,” writes Atlas Obscura, “runs 100 miles of subterranean roads over an area of more than 1,500 acres. It is the Detroit Salt Mine  and as a Detroit industry it is older than automobiles. As a geological  entity, this salt deposit is older even than the dinosaurs.” (via Pruned) View in High-Res

    “Some 1,200 feet beneath the streets of Detroit,” writes Atlas Obscura, “runs 100 miles of subterranean roads over an area of more than 1,500 acres. It is the Detroit Salt Mine and as a Detroit industry it is older than automobiles. As a geological entity, this salt deposit is older even than the dinosaurs.” (via Pruned)

  2. landscape architecture

    detroit

    detroit salt mines