1.  Rick Perlstein, author of The invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan spoke to Fresh Air contributor Dave Davies about how Reagan’s stories did not withstand scrutiny: 

"I say that Ronald Reagan could not have survived the age of Google. … He’s telling a story about out-of-control federal bureaucrats and how they even want a tourist paddle wheeler that plies the Mississippi River to get the same kind of fire insurance that commercial ships have, even though this paddle wheeler is this ancient — not a real ship, right? He says, "It has not even had a fire in its entire existence." All I have to do is Google the name of it … and find out that it had a fire two years before he spoke.
He found moral truths in the stories that he told. As people discovered when he was president, they often didn’t withstand scrutiny, but as they also discovered when he was president, it was always hard to make this criticism of Reagan stick. They called him “The Teflon President.” And his ability to make people feel good — to kind of preach this liturgy of absolution in which Americans were noble and pure and could absolve themselves of the responsibility of reckoning with alleged sins in America’s past — that was to me the soul of his appeal.”


Photo:
Ronald Reagan waves to the crowd on the final night of the Republican National Convention on Aug. 19, 1976 in Kansas City, Missouri. By David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images
View in High-Res

    Rick Perlstein, author of The invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan spoke to Fresh Air contributor Dave Davies about how Reagan’s stories did not withstand scrutiny: 

    "I say that Ronald Reagan could not have survived the age of Google. … He’s telling a story about out-of-control federal bureaucrats and how they even want a tourist paddle wheeler that plies the Mississippi River to get the same kind of fire insurance that commercial ships have, even though this paddle wheeler is this ancient — not a real ship, right? He says, "It has not even had a fire in its entire existence." All I have to do is Google the name of it … and find out that it had a fire two years before he spoke.

    He found moral truths in the stories that he told. As people discovered when he was president, they often didn’t withstand scrutiny, but as they also discovered when he was president, it was always hard to make this criticism of Reagan stick. They called him “The Teflon President.” And his ability to make people feel good — to kind of preach this liturgy of absolution in which Americans were noble and pure and could absolve themselves of the responsibility of reckoning with alleged sins in America’s past — that was to me the soul of his appeal.”

    Photo:

    Ronald Reagan waves to the crowd on the final night of the Republican National Convention on Aug. 19, 1976 in Kansas City, Missouri. By David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images

  2. ronald reagan

    rick perlstein

    american history

    politics

    interview

    fresh air

    dave davies

  1. New York Times National Security Correspondent David Sanger sees cyber-espionage as a whole new “field of conflict” on the global stage — and that the U.S. isn’t having an open discussion about it:

"The Obama administration has pressed more leak investigations, conducted more leak investigations, launched formal inquiries, or in some cases, criminal cases, than all previous [administrations] combined. And these investigations all have a chilling effect on later stories that you do even if the later stories are on completely different subjects.
I think there’s a lot more concern inside the U.S. government right now about being found to be talking to reporters, even if you’re talking about something that is unclassified. … It’s understandably difficult to get American officials to talk about their plans for potential cyberattacks of cyberdefenses. I understand that, but it’s also very difficult to get officials to talk about our policy about using these cyberweapons as a tool of American power. And that’s what worries me, because in a healthy democracy, I think the American citizens have to be at least informed of — and maybe participate in the debate about — how we want to use these weapons since we are vulnerable to them ourselves.”
View in High-Res

    New York Times National Security Correspondent David Sanger sees cyber-espionage as a whole new “field of conflict” on the global stage — and that the U.S. isn’t having an open discussion about it:

    "The Obama administration has pressed more leak investigations, conducted more leak investigations, launched formal inquiries, or in some cases, criminal cases, than all previous [administrations] combined. And these investigations all have a chilling effect on later stories that you do even if the later stories are on completely different subjects.

    I think there’s a lot more concern inside the U.S. government right now about being found to be talking to reporters, even if you’re talking about something that is unclassified. … It’s understandably difficult to get American officials to talk about their plans for potential cyberattacks of cyberdefenses. I understand that, but it’s also very difficult to get officials to talk about our policy about using these cyberweapons as a tool of American power. And that’s what worries me, because in a healthy democracy, I think the American citizens have to be at least informed of — and maybe participate in the debate about — how we want to use these weapons since we are vulnerable to them ourselves.”

  2. cyberwar

    cybersecurity

    espionage

    david sanger

    NSA

    obama

    new york times

    interview

    fresh air

    dave davies

  1. Happy Birthday Terry Gross, Dave Davies, and Marty Moss-Coane of WHYY’s RadioTimes! Hope your birthday is Fresh Fresh Fresh. 

(Yes, they all have the same birthday, and yes, it’s Valentines day!) 

    Happy Birthday Terry Gross, Dave Davies, and Marty Moss-Coane of WHYY’s RadioTimes! Hope your birthday is Fresh Fresh Fresh. 

    (Yes, they all have the same birthday, and yes, it’s Valentines day!) 

  2. happy birthday

    terry gross

    dave davies

    birthday

    party cat in a party hat

    marty moss-coane

  1. In light of our interview today with baseball player Jamie Moyer, we thought we’d share a fun vintage find.
Guess who?



That’s Fresh Air guest host Dave Davies playing on the Philadelphia Daily News' softball team (and reppin' TX with his Houston Astros hat)

View in High-Res

    In light of our interview today with baseball player Jamie Moyer, we thought we’d share a fun vintage find.


    Guess who?


    That’s Fresh Air guest host Dave Davies playing on the Philadelphia Daily News' softball team (and reppin' TX with his Houston Astros hat)

  2. fresh air

    jamie moyer

    baseball

    dave davies

    houston astros

    philadelphia daily news

  1. February 14 has a very special place in our hearts at WHYY because it is the birthday of three of our favorite people around here. Let’s all wish a very happy birthday to Terry, Dave and Marty!

    (For those of you who may not know Marty Moss-Coane, she’s the wonderful host of our local news show, Radio Times.)

  2. Birthday MANIA!

    February 14 is a good day in Radioland

    Terry Gross

    Dave Davies

    Marty Moss-Coane

  1. A few weeks ago, our guest host and veteran local reporter, Dave Davies, interviewed Pennsylvanian Republican State Rep. Daryl Metcalfe, prime sponsor of the state’s voter ID law, which is now under court challenge.

    Here’s an update from Dave:

    When I asked Metcalfe if he believed that in-person voter fraud was really occurring in the state, he said it was, and cited the case of another legislator who’d said in floor debate that his vote had been stolen by someone who went to his polling location and voted in his place.

    After the interview I called the lawmaker Metcalfe mentioned, State Rep. Bernie O’Neill. It eventually emerged that his vote hadn’t been stolen, and he’d felt pressured into exaggerating his story by Republicans anxious to get the voter ID law passed.

    You can read more on Dave’s blog here and then here. And you can listen to the Fresh Air interview with Metcalfe and read the clarification posted on NPR.

  2. Daryl Metcalfe

    PA voter ID law

    Dave Davies

    Fresh Air

    clarification

  1. Here’s a gem from behind-the-scenes at Fresh Air. I’ve been reading The Cop Who Would Be King: The Honorable Frank Rizzo, on loan from Fresh Air contributor and veteran local reporter Dave Davies, and learning a lot about the way politics worked in Philadelphia decades ago. When he showed me this Philadelphia Inquirer photo of the former police commissioner and mayor this morning, I couldn’t resist sharing.

    Can you spot Dave in this photo from 1987?

  2. Fresh Air

    Dave Davies

    Philadelphia Daily News

  1. Just a little shout out to Dave Davies who is doing an excellent job guest hosting this week while Terry is on vacation. Above: the other Dave Davies.

    Just a little shout out to Dave Davies who is doing an excellent job guest hosting this week while Terry is on vacation. Above: the other Dave Davies.

    (Source: dedicatedfollowerofrock)

  2. dave davies

    dave davies

    twins

  1. Happy Birthday Terry Gross, Dave Davies, and Marty Moss-Coane!!!!

Groomsmen Cake (by RainieAnne)

    Happy Birthday Terry Gross, Dave Davies, and Marty Moss-Coane!!!!

    Groomsmen Cake (by RainieAnne)

  2. birthday

    valentine's day

    terry gross

    dave davies

    marty moss-coane

  1. It’s like a paradox. I’m a fighter but yet, I’m so fearful. I don’t fight back and I don’t tell anyone. I don’t confront it. So I lived with those periods for 30-some years but I remember too, that when I drank heavily, when my emotions were not as stable, I would cry, sob and the pain — it felt good. I felt embarrassed but it felt good because I released some of those memories or that poison that was in my stomach.

    — In a new autobiography, The Big Fight, Sugar Ray Leonard details his own struggles with rage, addiction, sexual abuse and depression. Leonard talks with Fresh Air's Dave Davies about how he battled these obstacles and went from a shy kid growing up around Washington, D.C., to a hugely successful boxer.

  2. sugar ray leonard

    boxing

    dave davies

  1. Audio is now up for Dave Davies’ interview with Marc Kaufman about astrobiology and the search for life in the universe. Enjoy!

  2. dave davies

    Marc Kaufman

    astrobiology

    Astronomy

    space

  1. 2/14: Happy Birthday Terry Gross! Happy Birthday Dave Davies! (photo of Carl Kasell taken at Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me a few years ago)

    2/14: Happy Birthday Terry Gross! Happy Birthday Dave Davies! (photo of Carl Kasell taken at Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me a few years ago)

  2. terry gross

    dave davies

    birthday!

    carl kasell

  1. Six people — five men and a woman — approached a whitewashed house in the postcard-pretty village of Jenins in eastern Switzerland. Glancing cautiously up and down the narrow, darkened street, two members of the team walked to the door while the others hung back. They knew that no one was home. The owner was a few miles away, just across the border in Liechtenstein. One of the men pulled out a leather pouch and extracted a slender piece of metal. He slipped the metal into the lock and gently wiggled it deeper into the mechanism.

    — When Real Life Imitates Dan Brown: Douglas Frantz, describing a CIA break-in to a home filled with nuclear moles, in Fallout:The True Story of the CIA’s Secret War on Nuclear Trafficking. He’s on the show today, explaining why he thinks that the United States should have acted to breakup an international nuke network much sooner — and when they did, it was too little, too late.

  2. fallout

    douglas frantz

    nuclear

    dave davies

    npr

    aq khan

  1. 
Ryan Gosling On Blue Valentine’s initial NC-17 rating: "I  was very confused. It seems like I don’t really understand this rating  system. I was told it’s because my character performs oral sex on his  wife, and I thought, ‘There’s plenty of movies with men receiving oral  sex from women with R ratings.’ It seemed like a double standard." View in High-Res

    Ryan Gosling On Blue Valentine’s initial NC-17 rating: "I was very confused. It seems like I don’t really understand this rating system. I was told it’s because my character performs oral sex on his wife, and I thought, ‘There’s plenty of movies with men receiving oral sex from women with R ratings.’ It seemed like a double standard."

  2. ryan gosling

    fresh air

    npr

    dave davies