1. What makes a computer seem human isn’t how we perceive its intellect but its affect. Can it display frustration, surprise or delight just as we would? A computer scientist friend of mine makes that point by proposing his own version of the Turing Test. He says, “Say I’m writing a program and type in a couple of clever lines of code — I want the machine to say, ‘Ooh, neat!’ “

    That’s the goal of the new field called affective computing, which is aimed at getting machines to detect and express emotions. Wouldn’t it be nice if the airline’s automated agent could rejoice with you when you got an upgrade? Or if it could at least sound that way? Researchers are on the case, synthesizing sadness and pleasure in humanoid that fall just this side of creepy.

    — 

    Geoff Nunberg

    Computers can win chess games and Jeopardy, but can they express emotions?

  2. turing test

    computers

    Geoff Nunberg

  1. Fresh Air tech contributor Alexis Madrigal says soon we could be swallowing mini computers with our pills: 

What if you could swallow a computer the size of a poppy seed, and it could report back exactly if and when you took a medicine while recording how your body responded to the drug?
It sounds crazy, but the tiny computers exist. It sounds dangerous, but they were approved by the Food and Drug Administration. And the company that makes them, Proteus, has tens of millions of dollars and relationships with some of the biggest drug companies in the world, including Novartis.
David O’Reilly, the chief product officer at Proteus, says he believes that someday soon every single pill a doctor prescribes will come with an electronic component embedded right in it that tracks the pill’s absorption in your body.


Here’s how it works

image via techie feed View in High-Res

    Fresh Air tech contributor Alexis Madrigal says soon we could be swallowing mini computers with our pills: 

    What if you could swallow a computer the size of a poppy seed, and it could report back exactly if and when you took a medicine while recording how your body responded to the drug?

    It sounds crazy, but the tiny computers exist. It sounds dangerous, but they were approved by the Food and Drug Administration. And the company that makes them, Proteus, has tens of millions of dollars and relationships with some of the biggest drug companies in the world, including Novartis.

    David O’Reilly, the chief product officer at Proteus, says he believes that someday soon every single pill a doctor prescribes will come with an electronic component embedded right in it that tracks the pill’s absorption in your body.

    Here’s how it works

    image via techie feed

  2. technology

    medicine

    computers

    alexis madrigal

    fresh air

  1. With a botnet of 25,000 computers, you could break the security codes for Amazon.com, you could raid people’s accounts, you could get social security numbers and data — there’s almost no commercial security system in place that couldn’t be breached by a supercomputer of tens of thousands.

    — As many as 12 million computers worldwide have been infected with a highly-encrypted computer worm called Conficker. Writer Mark Bowden details how Conficker was discovered, how it works, and the ongoing programming battle to bring down Conficker on today’s Fresh Air.

  2. conficker

    mark bowden

    worm

    computers

    virus