1. Today journalist  McKenzie Funk  tells Fresh Air about the entrepreneurs looking to cash in on climate change. In the interview he talks about the massive gates designed to protect cities in the event of a large storm surge:

[In the Netherlands] It’s called the Maeslant Storm Surge Barrier (above) and it’s these two Eiffel Tower-sized gates. They swing closed and close the Port of Rotterdam, which is the most important port in all of Europe, it’s where most of the oil and gas come in and it’s where most of everything leaves. They have a huge computer warning system that says, ‘OK, the tides are surging. We need to close the barrier.’ And that actually happened for the second time in history late in 2013, just a few months ago.
… It basically swings closed from both sides and they meet in the middle, these two massive gates and then this piece comes up from below and it closes off the entire harbor — water can’t get in, water can’t get out.
… [The proposed gates to protect Manhattan] would go across the narrows, the area below the Verrazano Bridge. … The storm comes, warning system warns, and the gates swing closed and Manhattan is protected. … We’re talking Statue of Liberty [height] . … Prices are pretty variant at the moment, but [it’s] in the order of $10 billion.




image via MIT View in High-Res

    Today journalist  McKenzie Funk  tells Fresh Air about the entrepreneurs looking to cash in on climate change. In the interview he talks about the massive gates designed to protect cities in the event of a large storm surge:

    [In the Netherlands] It’s called the Maeslant Storm Surge Barrier (above) and it’s these two Eiffel Tower-sized gates. They swing closed and close the Port of Rotterdam, which is the most important port in all of Europe, it’s where most of the oil and gas come in and it’s where most of everything leaves. They have a huge computer warning system that says, ‘OK, the tides are surging. We need to close the barrier.’ And that actually happened for the second time in history late in 2013, just a few months ago.

    … It basically swings closed from both sides and they meet in the middle, these two massive gates and then this piece comes up from below and it closes off the entire harbor — water can’t get in, water can’t get out.

    … [The proposed gates to protect Manhattan] would go across the narrows, the area below the Verrazano Bridge. … The storm comes, warning system warns, and the gates swing closed and Manhattan is protected. … We’re talking Statue of Liberty [height] . … Prices are pretty variant at the moment, but [it’s] in the order of $10 billion.

    image via MIT

  2. fresh air

    climate change

    storm surge

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    holland

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    architecture

  1. Tomorrow we talk to journalist McKenzie Funk about “‘The Booming Business of Global Warming,” the topic of his new book Windfall.  We’ll talk about how climate change is affecting the economy—in shipping passages, surge gates, and buckling infrastructure. 

image of Canadian coastguard icebreaker via Businessweek  View in High-Res

    Tomorrow we talk to journalist McKenzie Funk about “‘The Booming Business of Global Warming,” the topic of his new book Windfall.  We’ll talk about how climate change is affecting the economy—in shipping passages, surge gates, and buckling infrastructure. 

    image of Canadian coastguard icebreaker via Businessweek 

  2. fresh air

    interview

    climate change

    enonomy

    business

    mckenzie funk

    arctic

    ice

  1. Ryan Lizza joins Fresh Air to talk about Keystone Pipeline XL and how Obama is at a possible turning point for climate change mitigation:

Barack Obama gave a very important speech on his second term climate change priorities and at the very last moment he inserted some language into that speech about how he would settle this issue of the Keystone Pipeline and he said for him, he doesn’t want to see that pipeline approved if it would significantly contribute to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. So how the State Department settles that question is what everyone has their eye on. 




… I think there’s an important moment here, for Barack Obama if he chooses to take it — even if he thinks that denying the permit to build Keystone won’t have a huge impact on greenhouse gas emissions — he could use it as a symbolic turning point in the kind of energy future he wants America to have. That is, he might say, ‘At some point we have to move away from fossil fuels and I’m using this moment to lead a crusade in America to move away from fossil fuels.’



Hear the full interview, read more interview highlights, or read his article in the New Yorker here.

photo via globalpost View in High-Res

    Ryan Lizza joins Fresh Air to talk about Keystone Pipeline XL and how Obama is at a possible turning point for climate change mitigation:

    Barack Obama gave a very important speech on his second term climate change priorities and at the very last moment he inserted some language into that speech about how he would settle this issue of the Keystone Pipeline and he said for him, he doesn’t want to see that pipeline approved if it would significantly contribute to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. So how the State Department settles that question is what everyone has their eye on. 

    … I think there’s an important moment here, for Barack Obama if he chooses to take it — even if he thinks that denying the permit to build Keystone won’t have a huge impact on greenhouse gas emissions — he could use it as a symbolic turning point in the kind of energy future he wants America to have. That is, he might say, ‘At some point we have to move away from fossil fuels and I’m using this moment to lead a crusade in America to move away from fossil fuels.’

    Hear the full interview, read more interview highlights, or read his article in the New Yorker here.

    photo via globalpost

  2. fresh air

    interview

    ryan lizza

    keystone pipeline

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  1. New Yorker reporter Ryan Lizza joins Fresh Air to discuss “unconventional” oil resources and the Keystone Pipeline project in Northern Alberta Canada and its environmental and political ramifications:

As we sit here in October of 2013, immigration reform seems dead, gun control legislation is dead, and the government is shut down with no grand bargain in sight. So a lot of environmentalists say, “Why not concentrate on the things you can do unilaterally?” And one of those things you can do unilaterally is address climate change…


photo of oil spill via the New York Times View in High-Res

    New Yorker reporter Ryan Lizza joins Fresh Air to discuss “unconventional” oil resources and the Keystone Pipeline project in Northern Alberta Canada and its environmental and political ramifications:

    As we sit here in October of 2013, immigration reform seems dead, gun control legislation is dead, and the government is shut down with no grand bargain in sight. So a lot of environmentalists say, “Why not concentrate on the things you can do unilaterally?” And one of those things you can do unilaterally is address climate change

    photo of oil spill via the New York Times

  2. fresh air

    interview

    ryan lizza

    the new yorker

    keystone pipeline

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  1. This week secretary of state John Kerry will be addressing climate change at the US-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue. The United States and China alone account for 40% of greenhouse gas emissions. New technology, alternative energy, and mitigation of pollution are at the forefront of this summit.
Jeff Goodell, author of the book As the World Burns,talked to Terry about the struggle for change regarding these very problems:

We are moving out of the era of fossil fuels. We are moving towards the era of renewable energy. Everyone in the coal industry I’ve, you know, reported on the coal industry for 10 years now - and they all know that this era is coming to an end. It’s all about delay, delay, delay, another quarter, another year. Let me get another, you know, a certain number of tons out of this mountain. Let me have my profits for this next quarter. It’s about short-term thinking versus long-term thinking.


Similarly, in the wake of Hurricane Sandy we spoke to New York Times reporter Justin Gills to discuss large-scale weather events.
image via nature.org

    This week secretary of state John Kerry will be addressing climate change at the US-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue. The United States and China alone account for 40% of greenhouse gas emissions. New technology, alternative energy, and mitigation of pollution are at the forefront of this summit.

    Jeff Goodell, author of the book As the World Burns,talked to Terry about the struggle for change regarding these very problems:

    We are moving out of the era of fossil fuels. We are moving towards the era of renewable energy. Everyone in the coal industry I’ve, you know, reported on the coal industry for 10 years now - and they all know that this era is coming to an end. It’s all about delay, delay, delay, another quarter, another year. Let me get another, you know, a certain number of tons out of this mountain. Let me have my profits for this next quarter. It’s about short-term thinking versus long-term thinking.

    Similarly, in the wake of Hurricane Sandy we spoke to New York Times reporter Justin Gills to discuss large-scale weather events.

    image via nature.org

  2. US-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue

    John Kerry

    Jeff Goodell

    Justin Gills

    Fresh Air

    Interview

    Climate Change

  1. The aptly-named Camille Seaman’s photographs of icebergs. View in High-Res

    The aptly-named Camille Seaman’s photographs of icebergs.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Justin Gillis

    Camille Seaman

    climate change

    photography

    environment

  1. New York Times environmental reporter Justin Gillis on how often he feels it’s necessary to quote climate change skeptics in his articles:

I quote the climate skeptics or deniers — whatever term you prefer — when they’re relevant. So when I’m doing a piece about the science itself and what the latest scientific findings are, especially if that’s a short piece, I don’t necessarily feel obliged to quote the climate skeptics the same way that if you were doing a story about evolution, a New York Times reporter wouldn’t feel obliged to call up a creationist and ask them what they think. On the other hand, the climate skeptics are politically relevant at this point in American history [in a way] the creationists are not, for example, so we have a fair chunk of the Congress … that sees political traction right now in questioning climate science or purporting not to believe it and so, in a political story or in a longer story, I usually do give some amount of space to the climate skeptics.

Image by Jonathan Stead/Flickr

    New York Times environmental reporter Justin Gillis on how often he feels it’s necessary to quote climate change skeptics in his articles:

    I quote the climate skeptics or deniers — whatever term you prefer — when they’re relevant. So when I’m doing a piece about the science itself and what the latest scientific findings are, especially if that’s a short piece, I don’t necessarily feel obliged to quote the climate skeptics the same way that if you were doing a story about evolution, a New York Times reporter wouldn’t feel obliged to call up a creationist and ask them what they think. On the other hand, the climate skeptics are politically relevant at this point in American history [in a way] the creationists are not, for example, so we have a fair chunk of the Congress … that sees political traction right now in questioning climate science or purporting not to believe it and so, in a political story or in a longer story, I usually do give some amount of space to the climate skeptics.

    Image by Jonathan Stead/Flickr

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Justin Gillis

    environment

    climate change

    journalism

  1. We’ve got approximately half as much sea ice in the Arctic in the fall now as we did say, 30 years or so ago — there’s been this dramatic decrease. There is emerging research — my colleagues and I published a paper last February on this — suggesting that as that sea ice melts it’s changing the jet stream, a current that steers weather in the mid-latitudes, places like New York. As sea ice melts, our research suggests that the jet stream is going to tend to get weaker. As the jet stream gets weaker, it’s easier for storms to stagnate or in some cases, maybe even move to the west, which is what this storm did.

    Most hurricanes, as they get as far north as a place like New York, especially late in the season — September, October — [the] standard pattern is for that strong jet stream to push those storms to the east. What we saw with this storm was that it moved to the west. It’s a very unusual track and I would say it’s a big research question whether we might see in general more stormy weather and storms taking a track like that as sea ice melts.

    — Dr. Radley Horton on melting sea ice and how it can steer hurricanes like Sandy in unusual directions

  2. Hurricane Sandy

    Fresh Air

    climate change

  1. Climate scientist Dr. Radley Horton on storms in the future:

Given the higher sea levels in the future, even if storms remain exactly the same, we’re going to get more frequent flooding events, maybe three times as many coastal flood events by the end of the century, just by virtue of having average sea levels be higher.

(Image: Reuters) View in High-Res

    Climate scientist Dr. Radley Horton on storms in the future:

    Given the higher sea levels in the future, even if storms remain exactly the same, we’re going to get more frequent flooding events, maybe three times as many coastal flood events by the end of the century, just by virtue of having average sea levels be higher.

    (Image: Reuters)

  2. climate change

    Hurricane Sandy

    Dr. Radley Horton

  1. Posted on 31 October, 2012

    3,424 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from buzzfeedandrew

    Also up for today: we talk about Hurricane Sandy with Dr. Radley Horton, the climate science lead for the science policy team of the NYC Panel on Climate Change.
buzzfeedandrew:

A parking lot full of yellow cabs is flooded as a result of Hurricane Sandy in Hoboken. (AP)
View in High-Res

    Also up for today: we talk about Hurricane Sandy with Dr. Radley Horton, the climate science lead for the science policy team of the NYC Panel on Climate Change.

    buzzfeedandrew:

    A parking lot full of yellow cabs is flooded as a result of Hurricane Sandy in Hoboken. (AP)

  2. Hurricane Sandy

    Fresh Air

    climate change

  1. This not only borrowed from some of the tactics that the tobacco industry had used to delay public understanding of the dangers of smoking, in some cases there were even overlaps of individuals and groups that were engaged in this communications campaign. A lot of corporate America opposed the Kyoto Accords. But only a small set of companies did what Exxon did which was to really go after the science as aggressively as they did.

    — On today’s Fresh Air, investigative journalist Steve Coll explains how ExxonMobil has used its money and power to wield significant influence in Washington, D.C. concerning issues like climate change.

  2. climate change

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    steve coll

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