1. We think they should be called trackers because we’re no longer using them as phones. There was a study done by a British cell phone carrier quite recently, which asked smart phone users, ‘What are you actually using these devices for?’ And making phone calls was actually the fifth most popular thing that smart phones are being used for. More popular was checking your email, checking your social media, listening to music, playing games, things of that sort. So phoning people on your smart phone is really not what most of us are using these devices for, so it’s not accurate, in a way, to refer to them as phones, when what we’re using them for are things other than making phone calls.

    But, more important than that, in some ways, is our understanding of what these things are when we call them phones, we think of them as phones. This is the whole idea of framing. In politics, if you call something a death panel, that influences what people think about it. If you call something ‘Obamacare,’ that influences what people think about it, positively or negatively. So with these smart phones, given that they do so much tracking, in the sense of, ‘We’re keeping track of our lives, we’re keeping track of the news, we’re keeping track of our friends, and corporate and government entities are keeping track of us,’ if we call them trackers, then we’re doing a much better job of informing ourselves what these devices are actually doing, and what we’re really using them for.

    — ProPublica investigative reporter Peter Maass on why we should call our phones “trackers”

  2. cell phones

    trackers

    Peter Maass

  1. Our cellphones are collecting a heck of a lot more information than we expect them to be collecting about us. They are collecting where we are, not just at one particular moment in the day but at virtually every moment of the day - where we move to, how long we stay there. This is location information that they collect and that the cellphone carriers collect and most importantly retain for sometimes quite long periods of time. They are also taking note of what we are buying, how we’re purchasing it, how often we’re purchasing it - that’s just the starting point for very important sensitive things phones take note of, including our text messages.

    — ProPublica investigative reporter Peter Maass on what information cell phone companies collect about us

  2. cell phones

    privacy

    information

  1. Posted on 9 July, 2012

    250 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from nprmusic

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