1. Fresh Air film critic David Edelstein reviews The Fault in Our Stars: 

I know people who cried at the trailer of the romantic teen cancer movie The Fault in Our Stars—at the movie they’ll need a life preserver to keep from drowning in a flood of tears. Me, I didn’t cry, though at times my tear ducts tingled; I was on the verge. The film is a little slick for my taste, too engineered. But it’s gently directed by Josh Boone and beautifully acted. Whatever the faults, it’s not in the stars.



Full review
View in High-Res

    Fresh Air film critic David Edelstein reviews The Fault in Our Stars

    I know people who cried at the trailer of the romantic teen cancer movie The Fault in Our Stars—at the movie they’ll need a life preserver to keep from drowning in a flood of tears. Me, I didn’t cry, though at times my tear ducts tingled; I was on the verge. The film is a little slick for my taste, too engineered. But it’s gently directed by Josh Boone and beautifully acted. Whatever the faults, it’s not in the stars.

    Full review

  2. the fault in our stars

    movie review

    david edelstein

    shailene woodley

    cancer

  1. I will never call myself a ‘cancer survivor’ because I think it devalues those who do not survive. There’s this whole mythology that people bravely battle their cancer and then they become ‘survivors.’ Well, the ones who don’t survive may be just as brave, just as courageous, wonderful people and I don’t feel that I have any leg up on them.

    — Barbara Ehrenreich 

  2. cancer

    breast cancer

    barbara ehrenreich

    writing

    activism

  1. In 1951, an African-American woman named Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with terminal cervical cancer. She was treated at Johns Hopkins University, where a doctor named George Gey snipped cells from her cervix without telling her. Gey discovered that Lacks’ cells could not only be kept alive, but would also grow indefinitely.
For the past 60 years Lacks’ cells have been cultured and used in experiments ranging from determining the long-term effects of radiation to testing the live polio vaccine. Her cells were commercialized and have generated millions of dollars in profit for the medical researchers who patented her tissue.
Lacks’ family, however, didn’t know the cell cultures existed until more than 20 years after her death.
In 2010 we spoke to Medical writer Rebecca Skloot who examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and effect that has had on her family — in her bestselling book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,
Now, 62 years later the Lacks family has given consent to this controversial medical contribution. Researchers who wish to use “HeLa” cells now have to submit a request and proposal that will be reviewed by the Lacks family. This new agreement is in the interest of respecting the family’s privacy, though, they still will not profit financially from any medical study. 
This is a remarkable story, both medically and ethically, about the rights we have to our bodies, even beyond the grave. 
image via NPR

    In 1951, an African-American woman named Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with terminal cervical cancer. She was treated at Johns Hopkins University, where a doctor named George Gey snipped cells from her cervix without telling her. Gey discovered that Lacks’ cells could not only be kept alive, but would also grow indefinitely.

    For the past 60 years Lacks’ cells have been cultured and used in experiments ranging from determining the long-term effects of radiation to testing the live polio vaccine. Her cells were commercialized and have generated millions of dollars in profit for the medical researchers who patented her tissue.

    Lacks’ family, however, didn’t know the cell cultures existed until more than 20 years after her death.

    In 2010 we spoke to Medical writer Rebecca Skloot who examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and effect that has had on her family — in her bestselling book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,


    Now, 62 years later the Lacks family has given consent to this controversial medical contribution. Researchers who wish to use “HeLa” cells now have to submit a request and proposal that will be reviewed by the Lacks family. This new agreement is in the interest of respecting the family’s privacy, though, they still will not profit financially from any medical study.

    This is a remarkable story, both medically and ethically, about the rights we have to our bodies, even beyond the grave.

    image via NPR

  2. fresh air

    henrietta lacks

    HeLa

    Rebecca Skloot

    cancer

    NPR

    new york times

  1. The show came to me in a period of time … when I was having real existential moments of thinking about time and the time that we have and that it is limited. It just is. It’s human nature to — thank god — not have [death] be the first thing you think about every single second, but there is a reality to it and as I’ve been aging and parents are dying and I’ve unfortunately lost friends who were way too young to go, you realize, what a privilege it is to age and that’s not a message we hear a lot in the United States.

    — Laura Linney talks to Dave Davies about aging and where she was emotionally when she began work on the Showtime dark comedy series The Big C, in which she plays a terminally ill cancer patient.

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Laura Linney

    The Big C

    Showtime

    cancer

  1. Laura Linney tells Dave Davies about why it was crucial to have her character’s appearance change in this last — and final — season of The Big C:

It was important to me that you actually see what’s happening to her, that you see the cancer and you can see how it changes people. … [S]o I cut my hair … and then I lost a lot of weight and there is something about what happens to the soul of a person as they are battling with an illness: the days when they’re feeling weak, the days where they’re strong, how that shifts and changes, what happens to the voice, how the body moves, breathing and … more than seeing the disease, you see the life that’s there and how the life is coping with the challenges that are happening with the body.

Image of Laura Linney in The Big C courtesy of Showtime View in High-Res

    Laura Linney tells Dave Davies about why it was crucial to have her character’s appearance change in this last — and final — season of The Big C:

    It was important to me that you actually see what’s happening to her, that you see the cancer and you can see how it changes people. … [S]o I cut my hair … and then I lost a lot of weight and there is something about what happens to the soul of a person as they are battling with an illness: the days when they’re feeling weak, the days where they’re strong, how that shifts and changes, what happens to the voice, how the body moves, breathing and … more than seeing the disease, you see the life that’s there and how the life is coping with the challenges that are happening with the body.

    Image of Laura Linney in The Big C courtesy of Showtime

  2. Fresh Air

    Interviews

    Laura Linney

    The Big C

    Showtime

    cancer

  1. nprfunfacts:

    two thumbs up.

  2. npr

    trivia

    facts

    movies

    all things considered

    ebert

    criticism

    pulitzer

    writing

    cinema

    cancer

  1.  
As the genetic understanding of cancer evolves, Siddhartha Mukherjee says, oncologists will be able to integrate that knowledge to develop more targeted treatment options — particularly as they find commonalities between different types of cancer.
"A breast cancer might turn out to have a close resemblance to a gastric cancer," he says. "And this kind of reorganization of cancer in terms of its internal genetic anatomy has really changed the way we treat and approach cancer in general." View in High-Res

    As the genetic understanding of cancer evolves, Siddhartha Mukherjee says, oncologists will be able to integrate that knowledge to develop more targeted treatment options — particularly as they find commonalities between different types of cancer.

    "A breast cancer might turn out to have a close resemblance to a gastric cancer," he says. "And this kind of reorganization of cancer in terms of its internal genetic anatomy has really changed the way we treat and approach cancer in general."

  2. Siddhartha Mukherjee

    the emperor of all maladies

    cancer

    oncology

  1. The word ‘cancer’ is credited to Hippocrates, the father of medicine, who noticed the crab-like (carcinos) spread of the disease throughout the human body.
crab (by origamiPete)

    The word ‘cancer’ is credited to Hippocrates, the father of medicine, who noticed the crab-like (carcinos) spread of the disease throughout the human body.

    crab (by origamiPete)

  2. crab

    cancer

    medicine

    hippocrates

    origami

  1. catsnotcancer:

Gettin’ it on like donkey kong….

Tomorrow: Oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee won a Pulitzer Prize this week for his biography of cancer, The Emperor of All Maladies. On tomorrow’s Fresh Air, he talks about cancer’s past and future — and new drugs that can kill cancer cells while sparing normal ones. 

    catsnotcancer:

    Gettin’ it on like donkey kong….

    Tomorrow: Oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee won a Pulitzer Prize this week for his biography of cancer, The Emperor of All Maladies. On tomorrow’s Fresh Air, he talks about cancer’s past and future — and new drugs that can kill cancer cells while sparing normal ones. 

  2. chemo

    siddhartha mukherjee

    the emperor of all maladies

    oncology

    cancer

  1. Oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee, on recent advances in cancer therapy: “If there’s a seminal discovery in  oncology in the last 20 years, it’s that idea that cancer genes are  often mutated versions of normal genes. And the arrival of  that moment really sent a chill down the spine of cancer biologists.  Because here we were hoping that cancer would turn out to be some kind  of exogenous event — a virus or something that could then be removed  from our environment and our bodies and we could be rid of it — but [it  turns out] that cancer genes are sitting inside of each and every one of  our chromosomes waiting to be corrupted or activated.” View in High-Res

    Oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee, on recent advances in cancer therapy: “If there’s a seminal discovery in oncology in the last 20 years, it’s that idea that cancer genes are often mutated versions of normal genes. And the arrival of that moment really sent a chill down the spine of cancer biologists. Because here we were hoping that cancer would turn out to be some kind of exogenous event — a virus or something that could then be removed from our environment and our bodies and we could be rid of it — but [it turns out] that cancer genes are sitting inside of each and every one of our chromosomes waiting to be corrupted or activated.”

  2. Siddhartha Mukherjee

    gene mutation

    cancer

    the emperor of all maladies

    terry gross

    npr

    fresh air

  1. I was looking around for background information on genetic mutations and cancer treatments to prep for today’s show and stumbled upon this podcast from Science. It’s an interview with Science's Jocelyn Kaiser on personalized treatment for cancer.

  2. science magazine

    cancer

  1. The Stages of Cancer Development (via the National Cancer Institute)

    The Stages of Cancer Development (via the National Cancer Institute)

  2. cancer

    biology

    cells

  1. Tomorrow: Oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee, author of the book The Emperor of Maladies: A Biography of Cancer, will talk about how cancer therapies are evolving as scientists learn more about the nature of individual cancer cells.

  2. oncology

    cancer

    Siddhartha Mukherjee

    the emperor of maladies

    npr